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  1. #11
    Senior Member human101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by the state i am in View Post
    mindfulness to me is about the saccade of your thoughts and its rhythmic ripple. it helps you feel deep in your bones the ballet of the mind. it helps you explore the mind's perspective of the body, and the body's perspective of the mind.
    Loved the way you described this friend.

  2. #12
    Senior Member zago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hard View Post
    I have practiced mindfulness a little in the past, as I actually needed it (recommendation from therapist). Over time I sort of adopted the habits it taught me enough that I stabalized a bit more than normal which was ultimately the goal.

    This is interesting because what you are describing is sort of the opposite of what is supposed to happen, at least from my understanding of it. I was taught that mindful breathing and being is supposed to help you be aware that you are having thoughts, but allow them to pass through you uneffected. In essence, it's a quiet mind without overpowering brain chatter. So it's like the former you is what mindfulness is supposed to. Being on autopilot. Ultimately that is what I was trying to achieve since what I needed was a quiet mind. But this is just one aspect of it. It seems like the latter parts is what you acheived and ultimately is mindfulness. I never considered it being something people wouldn't want, but it's all about everyone having different operating system requirements at the end of the day.
    Some pros and cons of mindfulness described in the NYT:

    I am almost tempted to start meditating 15-20 minutes a day again. Almost, but not quite. The cons in that article, I don't like. And I don't like meditation itself.

    The thing about the mind is that it never quiets down for very long, ever, even if you have meditated for decades. Well known zen masters support this.

    One thing I have a particular problem with is that letting thoughts pass is itself a thought, and once you engage in it, now you unavoidably begin to evaluate just how well you're doing it, which is also a thought, and so-on. That's extra stuff. That's what I didn't like experiencing in the shower, being more aware of my thoughts and how I was handling them. I find that my experience is actually more raw and unfiltered if I don't bother to tend to my thoughts, even if I do zone out from time to time. Thinking about thinking is a kind of irritation that you realize you can do without after so long.

  3. #13
    I could do things Hard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zago View Post
    Some pros and cons of mindfulness described in the NYT:

    I am almost tempted to start meditating 15-20 minutes a day again. Almost, but not quite. The cons in that article, I don't like. And I don't like meditation itself.

    The thing about the mind is that it never quiets down for very long, ever, even if you have meditated for decades. Well known zen masters support this.

    One thing I have a particular problem with is that letting thoughts pass is itself a thought, and once you engage in it, now you unavoidably begin to evaluate just how well you're doing it, which is also a thought, and so-on. That's extra stuff. That's what I didn't like experiencing in the shower, being more aware of my thoughts and how I was handling them. I find that my experience is actually more raw and unfiltered if I don't bother to tend to my thoughts, even if I do zone out from time to time. Thinking about thinking is a kind of irritation that you realize you can do without after so long.
    Nice article. I haven't seen much offered in the way of critizism towards mindfullness. It's becoming a "fad" thing for people to do (unfortunately). I am pretty weary of that sort of stuff because a lot of misinformation can start getting passed around. Ultimately though, I don't think the side effects are all that bad. I think it might be a matter of personal prefrence, and it might be a good idea to take breaks and times off from doing it depending on the needs.

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