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  1. #1
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Default do you think depression and anxiety are overdiagnosed

    or that many people have depression and anxiety? I had more to say but I forgot

  2. #2
    WhoCares
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    I think its more prevalent that even diagnosis indicate, although I will also say that the medical profession seems to love any diagnosis that results in a prescription. But overall I think modern life and the transgression of ones authenticity out of fear, most likely puts a large proportion of the population genuinely into those conditions. Few people are living the life they really desire (not measuring in terms of money but in terms of what they would rather be doing with their lives). It's almost a given that once you reach adulthood you should put your personal interests into the occassional hobby category and get in with torturing yourself in an office job for the sake if money. The human equivalent of being a battery hen. That cant be good.

  3. #3
    Knobgoblin mooseantlers's Avatar
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    Definitely levels are rising at a scary rate, if any thing there are many people un-diagnosed; when it comes to mental illness people are less likely to seek help.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhoCares View Post
    I think its more prevalent that even diagnosis indicate, although I will also say that the medical profession seems to love any diagnosis that results in a prescription. But overall I think modern life and the transgression of ones authenticity out of fear, most likely puts a large proportion of the population genuinely into those conditions. Few people are living the life they really desire (not measuring in terms of money but in terms of what they would rather be doing with their lives). It's almost a given that once you reach adulthood you should put your personal interests into the occassional hobby category and get in with torturing yourself in an office job for the sake if money. The human equivalent of being a battery hen. That cant be good.
    So much this.

    I had nasty depression that mostly went away when we stopped being impoverished. Crazy how that works!
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    I think its actually to do with the amount of people that actually do have anxiety or depression disorders. I attribute it to the fast-paced civilization we live in today, to where if anybody falls behind, they are utterly lost and displaced. In today's society, there are all of these little events that are said to be "life-changing" and that if one were to miss those opportunities or mess up, then they would not be successful. Who wouldn't be anxious in a system like this? But it intensifies if the person in question already had above average anxiety levels. Depression follows the same route, if these crucial decisions or small events are performed poorly, then society has ingrained that those people are average citizens with nothing left to look forward to except the successes of others.

  6. #6
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    so basicallly, what we need to do is destroy society and build it from the ground up and make it more decent for people to do what they want to do.problem solved

  7. #7
    Member empertet's Avatar
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    I don't really believe in either (bar people who have been exceptionally screwed over), I think depression and anxiety are just manifestations of us continually having to pretend to be someone we're not. The root to this problem is usually having a job which isn't right for you (and that you can't leave), Continuous negative input from media, Being exposed to excessive light after dark (this causes the body to produce "wake-up" hormones up to 16 hours after exposure), Too much instant entertainment (the brain requires boredom to relax), Ready meals (Full of trans-fat, saturated fat and other things the human body isn't designed to regulate properly), excessive noise and light pollution (This is actually causing some birds to stress their vocal cords to reach 100dB [roughly one Jackhammer] just to be heard across streets), pollution (found to cause asthma, and believed to cause obesity [mice exposed to pollution produced more fat cells than those who where not exposed, despite both receiving the same amount of food]) and lastly- the one that we can't blame on other people or things we deem "beyond our personal control": EXERCISE. It's proven to reduce stress and anxiety (and in some cases rid people of both), yet we always try to make excuses not to at least give it a go.

    I admit that I'm guilty of some of these , However I have recently started walking down the "natural" path (that's basically asking myself "What did we do about _____ before technology/convenience?", the answer is usually simple and effective: Eat better, eat less, do some yoga, avoid things you think are bad, enjoy silence etc. Since I started living more simply I've felt less stressed and as for anxiety? Well seeing more than 30 faces in a room still freaks me out but I've started to learn to ignore what I can't see, Just as long as it's not too loud I can cope without running off.

    As a species we need to stop making things so easy (Unlike Parts of America, in England you're never more than 5-10 minutes away from a 24 hour shop), stop places other than emergency services being open past 3am, and learn that talking on a phone/computer doesn't equal socialising on ANY level. I view any message via technology as an informational exchange rather than true social interaction.

    Sorry for the rant, if someone tl;dr's me I won't blame them!
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  8. #8
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by empertet View Post
    I don't really believe in either (bar people who have been exceptionally screwed over), I think depression and anxiety are just manifestations of us continually having to pretend to be someone we're not. The root to this problem is usually having a job which isn't right for you (and that you can't leave), Continuous negative input from media, Being exposed to excessive light after dark (this causes the body to produce "wake-up" hormones up to 16 hours after exposure), Too much instant entertainment (the brain requires boredom to relax), Ready meals (Full of trans-fat, saturated fat and other things the human body isn't designed to regulate properly), excessive noise and light pollution (This is actually causing some birds to stress their vocal cords to reach 100dB [roughly one Jackhammer] just to be heard across streets), pollution (found to cause asthma, and believed to cause obesity [mice exposed to pollution produced more fat cells than those who where not exposed, despite both receiving the same amount of food]) and lastly- the one that we can't blame on other people or things we deem "beyond our personal control": EXERCISE. It's proven to reduce stress and anxiety (and in some cases rid people of both), yet we always try to make excuses not to at least give it a go.

    I admit that I'm guilty of some of these , However I have recently started walking down the "natural" path (that's basically asking myself "What did we do about _____ before technology/convenience?", the answer is usually simple and effective: Eat better, eat less, do some yoga, avoid things you think are bad, enjoy silence etc. Since I started living more simply I've felt less stressed and as for anxiety? Well seeing more than 30 faces in a room still freaks me out but I've started to learn to ignore what I can't see, Just as long as it's not too loud I can cope without running off.

    As a species we need to stop making things so easy (Unlike Parts of America, in England you're never more than 5-10 minutes away from a 24 hour shop), stop places other than emergency services being open past 3am, and learn that talking on a phone/computer doesn't equal socialising on ANY level. I view any message via technology as an informational exchange rather than true social interaction.

    Sorry for the rant, if someone tl;dr's me I won't blame them!
    for someone who has suffered from severe clinical depression I can say with out a doubt simply eating better and doing yoga doesn't take away the depression. I ask the oq because a lot of people who have been diagnosed with depression have been able to pretty much over come through life style changes. while there's a few people that life style changes do zilch. I guess it comes down to situational vs chemical. I can see situational not being over diagnosed, but I have my suspicions that chemical might be. JMO

  9. #9
    Member empertet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    for someone who has suffered from severe clinical depression I can say with out a doubt simply eating better and doing yoga doesn't take away the depression. I ask the oq because a lot of people who have been diagnosed with depression have been able to pretty much over come through life style changes. while there's a few people that life style changes do zilch. I guess it comes down to situational vs chemical. I can see situational not being over diagnosed, but I have my suspicions that chemical might be. JMO
    I too have had severe depression (I was removed from high school for two and a half years after I made a slip-up and my mother had the misfortune to witness the bullying I had been putting up with since I was a child), and I concur, as I said "bar people who have been exceptionally screwed over" That depression is vastly different from more simple depression caused by vague feelings like loneliness, poor life quality and the feeling of just "lacking that something" I know both quite well and I (hope) I can tell which I have at any given time. The latter seems like lifestyle changes are key, the only cure for the former is to move where no one knows who you are and start fresh. :/
    I offer understanding, help and basic human decency, in exchange all I ask is to be accepted.

  10. #10
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by empertet View Post
    I too have had severe depression (I was removed from high school for two and a half years after I made a slip-up and my mother had the misfortune to witness the bullying I had been putting up with since I was a child), and I concur, as I said "bar people who have been exceptionally screwed over" That depression is vastly different from more simple depression caused by vague feelings like loneliness, poor life quality and the feeling of just "lacking that something" I know both quite well and I (hope) I can tell which I have at any given time. The latter seems like lifestyle changes are key, the only cure for the former is to move where no one knows who you are and start fresh. :/
    really? because I did the whole geographical cure and it made it worse.also no offense, but if moving away took care of the depression for you, it sounds more like severe situational depression rather than severe chemical depression. for me the only thing that keeps depression at bay is taking a mood stabilizer, I've tried going off it a few times and even after the withdrawl had passed in 2-3 months I would end up suicidal. even though my situation hadn't changed and really wasn't that bad

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