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  1. #11
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    I don't think it's overdiagnosed, but like you pointed out, prpl, there's a difference between a single episode and chronic. I do though remember learning in my Abnormal Psych class that of people who have had one depressive episode, about 80% of them will have two or more depressive episodes total in the course of their lives. So while some people may easily pull out of an episode, it is likely that they will fall into one again.

    I think in general mental health is stigmatized and underdiagnosed, if anything, because of people's fears of how the diagnoses might impact their lives. To some extent this is understandable - the height of stupidity IMO is that in the US, a psychiatrist cannot be seen by another doctor for any mental health struggles or they are liable to lose their license to practice. While certainly their mental health should be taken into consideration when licensing, psychiatrists of all people should know that a mental health disorder does not necessarily equate to inability to perform one's job well.

    @empertet listed some good reasons we make ourselves more susceptible to unhealth in general, although also for the most part I seem to remember that most mental health disorders whose pathology is understood have at least a genetic component, if not a significant hereditary basis. Many seem to operate on the stress-diathesis (also called diathesis-stress) model, where environment can trigger genetic predisposition to mental health issues to be expressed. Alcoholism and schizophrenia are both believed to be disorders that work in that way: someone with alcoholic genes who regulates their drinking may never become alcoholic, while someone with schizophrenic genes whose home environment is stable may never become schizophrenic. Stressful events can also impact the timing of manic-depressive swings in bipolar disorder. So, environment can certainly play a large role in manifestation of an illness, and ironically the stigmatization of mental health makes it more likely that people will be more mentally unhealthy and not seek treatment.

    Fortunately the historical trend is increasing acceptance so I am hoping that continues and I try in my life to be an advocate.

  2. #12
    Member empertet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    really? because I did the whole geographical cure and it made it worse.also no offense, but if moving away took care of the depression for you, it sounds more like severe situational depression rather than severe chemical depression. for me the only thing that keeps depression at bay is taking a mood stabilizer, I've tried going off it a few times and even after the withdrawl had passed in 2-3 months I would end up suicidal. even though my situation hadn't changed and really wasn't that bad
    I suppose it depends on the original cause, do you even remember what started the spiral? I know I have difficulty remembering what starts mine one I've gone too far into the abyss .
    It actually took a couple of years after moving to "clean out" my head. I needed rid of the reminders for long enough to come to terms with the past and clear out my head by accepting what happened and how I wont let it happen again. Unfortunately I still have yet to say the words "I trust you" and mean it (to a second person, one doesn't sound like enough).
    I actually stopped trying to commit suicide as I could never do it right. I figured I deserved to live with the misery. :/

    I won't lie, I'm kind of cheating by taking high doses of 5HTP and 6000iU of vitamin D to stabilise the dark thoughts. Once you've had a mental breakdown I think two things happen:
    the first is that once you know that abyss you can never un-know it. (Pretty dark but I think it's true)
    The second is that nothing really matters. But the second one is actually better than people think, sure saying "nothing I do really matters" sounds dark and depressive when you first look at it but it also holds a secret potential: Nothing I do matters, I'm free. Truly free. I don't have to worry any more because nothing I do matters so why would anything anyone else does matter either? I can do what I want because I've been though things far worse than what any single human can do to me now. I know the pain so I am above it.
    I am bulletproof to insults and mockery. Only I have the right to judge me.

    Sorry, went off on one :/
    That's sleep deprivation for you...
    Have you tried a more natural cure? Vit D, 5HTP, etc?
    @skylights: My sister is bipolar, (not on my side genetically) and I admit I tend to make sweeping generalisations (there are lots of asterisks I'm adding mentally as I go along XD), I completely blanked on genetic predisposition. Even so, for those genes to be passed on people have to want them. To me that says no amount of predisposition to genetic depression is truly severe enough to be hopeless or else those genes wouldn't be there in the first place? I'm also going to go out on a limb here and say that the brain always balances out: With great lows come great highs (you just have to get out and live a little to feel them).
    I offer understanding, help and basic human decency, in exchange all I ask is to be accepted.

  3. #13
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    yes that's exactly how mental illness works, you just have to will it out. yes I ultimately chose to be mentally ill.

    btw i was dx schizoaffective but I was doing lots of drugs and recently went of my meds and the mood stuff kicked back up, but the psychosis and that stuff hasn't kicked back up, really.

  4. #14
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alea_iacta_est View Post
    I think its actually to do with the amount of people that actually do have anxiety or depression disorders. I attribute it to the fast-paced civilization we live in today, to where if anybody falls behind, they are utterly lost and displaced. In today's society, there are all of these little events that are said to be "life-changing" and that if one were to miss those opportunities or mess up, then they would not be successful. Who wouldn't be anxious in a system like this? But it intensifies if the person in question already had above average anxiety levels. Depression follows the same route, if these crucial decisions or small events are performed poorly, then society has ingrained that those people are average citizens with nothing left to look forward to except the successes of others.
    There are issues such as those, and also a loss (at least in Western civilization) of a cultural narrative where if you just do the right things and believe the right things and play your part, you will be taken care of and life will work out for you somehow. We've moved into the postmodern view, where there are not necessarily universal values and truths to guide us and there is not a reassurance that things will work out / something is watching over us.

    I also do think there were depressed and anxious people before (due to people being jammed into the social structure regardless of whether they fit), but the cultural expectation was to not talk about it or face it squarely and accept it. So part of the glut of the depressed and anxious comes from it being underdiagosed or dismissed out of hand before. There was a time when it was embarrassing culturally to admit you were seeing a therapist and/or were clinically depressed (along with a host of other mental issues).

    All that being said, I still think we haven't yet found that balance between anxieties/depressions that should be treated medically vs the typical natural stresses of life that can be compensated for by perserence and commitment. I think we have forgotten in today's culture that life sometimes does involve aches and pains, and how to distinguish between those types of natural pains (sometimes part of the growing process) vs the types of pains that are more serious and need readjustment and/or treatment.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

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  5. #15
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by empertet View Post
    @skylights: My sister is bipolar, (not on my side genetically) and I admit I tend to make sweeping generalisations (there are lots of asterisks I'm adding mentally as I go along XD), I completely blanked on genetic predisposition. Even so, for those genes to be passed on people have to want them. To me that says no amount of predisposition to genetic depression is truly severe enough to be hopeless or else those genes wouldn't be there in the first place? I'm also going to go out on a limb here and say that the brain always balances out: With great lows come great highs (you just have to get out and live a little to feel them).
    Well, what do you mean by hopeless? Certainly someone can have bipolar and with medication and environmental regulation can go far to improve the quality of their life. They may never be free of the condition, but at least one can hope to relegate it to a position where it is not controlling one's life. I don't think it's realistic to think that the average person can be completely rid of their disorders, but I absolutely do think everyone has the ability to live a fulfilling life regardless of their circumstances. Some are certainly more predisposed to struggle internally than others, but we have to deal with what we're given.

    I don't know if it's true that for genes to be passed on people have to want them - I don't know that most people are really aware how genes work, short of really basic heredity, especially in less developed areas. That the person who passed on the genes was able to reproduce isn't really a guarantor of anything... the pregnancy may well have been completely unintentional...

    Though I would agree that there is no predisposition that makes things hopeless - there is always hope.

  6. #16
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    hey guys - we're going to lock down the thread for now. Mods are still discussing it but for now I'll say that the forum is not an appropriate place to discuss mental health questions that need to be handled by professionals. While we understand that everyone's intentions are good, we feel that this kind of discussion causes more harm than good. You need to be talking to your therapist/psychiatrist/other mental health professionals about this stuff in person, not getting suggestions from regular people on the forum. We don't want to see scenarios where people are using the forum as a sounding board to avoid talking to professionals.

    Discussing these kinds of things in the abstract is fine, and sharing personal experience is fine, but we would like to discourage personal advice/medication suggestions/"diagnoses"/etc involving serious mental health issues. We've been talking about adding a line to this effect in the FAQ and this thread has reminded us of that, so stay tuned. Thanks
    -end of thread-

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