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  1. #21
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danseen View Post
    No.

    Maybe psychologists will differ, but then:

    - somebody can have no friends by choice
    - a person who only cares about clubbing and celebrities has by definition limited interests
    - i've never sewn in my lifetime, and i think in modern times people only do this as a hobby
    - And? many "healthy" people
    - some people refuse to do so out of principle. are they weird or abnormal?

    You're normal IMO, not ill because idiot psychologists like to label people or don't see humanity as complex as the rest of NORMAL humanity does
    i'm with ya, danseen.

    not sure if it's been mentioned here, but Aspergers was even eliminated from the DSM V (not that that should be looked to as any sort of source of absolute truth either).

    OP, you're fine how you are. if there are parts of yourself you don't like or that make life difficult for you, you can work on learning to work with them. that goes for every single person though.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  2. #22
    failed poetry slam career chubber's Avatar
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    When speaking to someone with Aspergers, you will notice a tremble in their voice, since they are basically freaking out. Their eyes will be looking to the sides (away), not directly focussing on you. Just as you think they become comfortable with you, they might lose confidence and their eyes start wondering.

    The RAADS-R test's score works different to what one would expect. For instance, someone that scores 190 might have a less severe form of Aspergers than the person with 140. One would have to look at each answer to form a better opinion on what the person is answering and why.

    I have met an INFP and ISTJ, who both happen to be diagnosed with PPD-NOS, but they consider themselves Aspies. As far as I know the ICD-10 still defines Aspergers, where as the new DSM-V placed it under the autism spectrum.

    Alex Plank, one of many Aspie representatives, happens to get ENFP on the MBTI test.

    Could it be that @Alea_iacta_est was correct in saying that Aspergers are form of deflated Fe. And most of the types that I have met, happened to be Fi users. It doesn't explain the INFJ though. Although I can see why they would place the person under the autism spectrum.

    I am beginning to think that Aspergers isn't a syndrome, or disorder, but rather just a form of personality that requires less social stimulation. However, I have also come to learn the more you isolate yourself, the worse the socialising problem becomes.


  3. #23
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chubber View Post
    When speaking to someone with Aspergers, you will notice a tremble in their voice, since they are basically freaking out. Their eyes will be looking to the sides (away), not directly focussing on you. Just as you think they become comfortable with you, they might lose confidence and their eyes start wondering.

    The RAADS-R test's score works different to what one would expect. For instance, someone that scores 190 might have a less severe form of Aspergers than the person with 140. One would have to look at each answer to form a better opinion on what the person is answering and why.

    I have met an INFP and ISTJ, who both happen to be diagnosed with PPD-NOS, but they consider themselves Aspies. As far as I know the ICD-10 still defines Aspergers, where as the new DSM-V placed it under the autism spectrum.

    Alex Plank, one of many Aspie representatives, happens to get ENFP on the MBTI test.

    Could it be that @Alea_iacta_est was correct in saying that Aspergers are form of deflated Fe. And most of the types that I have met, happened to be Fi users. It doesn't explain the INFJ though. Although I can see why they would place the person under the autism spectrum.

    I am beginning to think that Aspergers isn't a syndrome, or disorder, but rather just a form of personality that requires less social stimulation. However, I have also come to learn the more you isolate yourself, the worse the socialising problem becomes.

    I'm actually more inclined to put high functioning Aspergers (Yep, the high functioning out of the high functioning Autistics) into Avoidant Personality Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, or Social Phobia Disorders, and for those lower on the high functioning spectrum would probably be one of those disorders comorbid Obsessive Compulsive.

    It might even be that High Functioning Aspergers would fit in the Cluster C group along with AvPD, Dependent PD, and OCD as a separate disorder.

  4. #24
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alea_iacta_est View Post
    I'm actually more inclined to put high functioning Aspergers (Yep, the high functioning out of the high functioning Autistics) into Avoidant Personality Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, or Social Phobia Disorders, and for those lower on the high functioning spectrum would probably be one of those disorders comorbid Obsessive Compulsive.

    It might even be that High Functioning Aspergers would fit in the Cluster C group along with AvPD, Dependent PD, and OCD as a separate disorder.
    how do you know so much?

  5. #25
    Senior Member danseen's Avatar
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    It's common fact that Asperger's is a label to undermine people with those traits.

    it's the norm in most UK NHS hospitals to publicly admit to this.

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