User Tag List

First 1234513 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 192

Thread: Lucid dreaming

  1. #21
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clueless View Post
    Yes, they do seem very real. But there are things you can look for to discern whether or not you're dreaming.
    Great! Could you tell me what they are?

  2. #22
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Great! Could you tell me what they are?
    Events which are impossible in waking life are common while in the lucid dream state.

  3. #23
    Senior Member htb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9
    Posts
    1,506

    Default

    I experience, infrequently, both lucid dreaming and sleep paralysis; in each situation I start myself awake.

  4. #24
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colmena View Post
    I've only had a few substantial lucid dreams in my lifetime.
    There are two ways to enter the lucid dream state. One is to fall asleep and dream and become conscious you are dreaming. The other is to start off awake or conscious and slowly and carefully turn off your cognitive faculties until you reach the dream state while still staying conscious.

    What is important to remember though is, when you are fully awake, to process your lucid dream through your conscious mind. That is it is very important to evaluate your dream so you can integrate it into your values and your life.

    Always remember your awake mind is in charge, and your dream mind is like a delightful child.

    That is, your awake mind is the responsible adult and your dream mind is like your child who needs to be looked after and understood.

  5. #25
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by htb View Post
    I experience, infrequently, both lucid dreaming and sleep paralysis; in each situation I start myself awake.
    Oh man, sleep paralysis is scary sometimes. On one occasion I hallucinated dark figures standing in front of me talking to me. I was conscious that I was dreaming and I could see the room I was in, but there were um...additions. It generally takes a huge effort for me to will myself into waking, and that particular time was no exception.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  6. #26
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    I had sleep paralysis when I'd fallen asleep during class.

    That was scary.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  7. #27
    Senior Member VanillaCat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I had sleep paralysis when I'd fallen asleep during class.

    That was scary.

    Same here. I couldn't control what I was doing and as the teacher was talking, I imagined a tv with static, and the Muppets were coming out of it. But I could still hear and see the teacher. It was weird. Period.

  8. #28
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I had sleep paralysis when I'd fallen asleep during class.
    I find sleep paralysis OK as long as I don't try and do anything.

    And sleep paralysis has its counterpoint in paralysis of the mind.

    Sleep paralysis is easy to understand - for instance, a car is speeding towards you and you can't move. While mental paralysis is simply not knowing what to do.

    Both can induce panic and both derive from the same source.

    When you go to sleep, it is all or part of your cognitive faculties that go to sleep. It may be the ability to consciously move your muscles that goes to sleep. Or it may be your ability to judge that goes to sleep. Or is may be your sense of humour that goes to sleep - yes, your sense of humour is a cognitive faculty.

    But I think the most interesting faculty to put to sleep is your sense of what is coming next.

    Most of us take this faculty entirely for granted and so we aren't even aware it exists. So when it goes to sleep, it can induce a mild panic.

    But once our sense of what is coming next is asleep and we have moved through our mild panic, everything comes as a surprise.

    It is as though everything is fresh and new - it is as though the world is born again.

    And it is important to remember, when we are fully awake, to process our surprises through our conscious mind, that is, simply think about them so that we can integrate them into our values and life. So we will be prepared and ready for our next adventure.

  9. #29
    Junior Member Entity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I've found the easiest way to wake from lucid dreaming is to find the nearest building and jump off (I've only ever hit the ground once before waking).

    Side Note: I would advise against ever trying to read anything while lucid dreaming. I tried to dial a phone once in a dream and felt like I was going insane because I couldn't remember what numbers and letters looked like. I completely lost control of the dream and descended into a nightmare. All subsequent attempts to read anything have also failed.

  10. #30
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Entity View Post
    I've found the easiest way to wake from lucid dreaming is to find the nearest building and jump off (I've only ever hit the ground once before waking).

    Side Note: I would advise against ever trying to read anything while lucid dreaming. I tried to dial a phone once in a dream and felt like I was going insane because I couldn't remember what numbers and letters looked like. I completely lost control of the dream and descended into a nightmare. All subsequent attempts to read anything have also failed.
    I suppose I think the most important thing is to learn how to go to sleep consciously and how to wake up consciously.

    The second most important thing is to learn the different types of lucid dream you can have.

    And the third thing to learn is the effects of particular dreams.

    It is becoming plain that all this lucid dreaming is taking place almost by accident - whereas it is skill to be learnt.

Similar Threads

  1. I Can't Lucid Dream.
    By Cygnus in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-14-2015, 04:14 AM
  2. Lucid Dream Journal
    By The Wailing Specter in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-13-2014, 10:51 PM
  3. Lucid dreams and type
    By Kurt.Is.God in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 03-26-2012, 06:12 AM
  4. Lucid Dreaming and Dream Control
    By JoSunshine in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-11-2011, 09:56 PM
  5. Lucid dreaming without control
    By Sahara in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-02-2007, 09:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO