User Tag List

View Poll Results: Is ygolo an aspie? (please consider carefully, serious question)

Voters
13. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes.

    2 15.38%
  • No.

    11 84.62%
123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 56

Thread: Am I an Aspie?

  1. #1

    Default Am I an Aspie?

    Those of you who have been on the forum a long time know that when I joined both my counselor and I had thought that I might have tendencies that could be classified as somewhere on the Autism Spectrum. I should also note that not all autism spectrum disorders manifest the same.

    I had initially decided to refuse the label and embarked on learning as much as could about body language, conversation, leadership, and other things related to the deficits associated with Asperger's Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    I posted the following on Experience Project* a little while ago:
    http://www.experienceproject.com/sto...ndrome/3430359
    A lot of the descriptions fit me.

    When I take this test on wired magazine's site (http://www.actionpam.com/cgi-bin/aq.cgi) I get a score of 42.

    For the most part, I function well enough to get by. I had at one point worked as a circuit designer for on of silicon valley's big players (though not in silicon valley). I am now pursuing a PhD in a scientific field.

    I have had three relatively long term relationships. The first time, I allowed myself to get attached, but the other two I refrained to avoid the heart ache of being left. Unfortunately, it also means that these relationships were less meaningful than the first.

    My friends, for the most part, like me a lot...or at least I believe they do.

    Executive Function:
    Still, if I filter my situation through the lens of Asperger's, I believe my research adviser has become frustrated with my lack of executive function.

    I am horrible at multi-tasking, which seems to be an integral part of grad student life (teaching, classes, research, and meetings in horrible one to two hour blocks). Although, corporate America can get bad if they schedule a ridiculous amount of meetings, it was never as bad as my first two years as a grad student.

    I have always called myself a "high inertia" person. It takes a lot to get me going, but once I do, look out, because you won't be able to stop me.

    The problem unfortunately, is now, I am having a hard time getting enough inertia to get me rolling.

    I also do have trouble with birthdays, calling family members, and so on. My calendar and smartphone (which reminds me of the birthday of everyone on facebook--really the only reason I have facebook) has helped a lot in this arena.

    I am also rather messy and people have often commented that my self care is poor. Ironically, once in a while, people with remark that I am "highly organized" and this will take me by surprised.

    Central Coherence:
    People often complain that I often don't provide enough context or motivation for my work. They also often say I am too focused on the details. Some even remark that I am "ridiculously" detail oriented.

    But I don't think of myself that way (especially considering how disorganized I can be). I, in fact, think of myself as a pattern and "big-picture" person. It just so happens that the big picture I see tends to be quite different from most people.

    If I can think of something in mathematical terms, I will. I can, at this point, do this in practically every situation--math is the science of patterns, and what situation does not have patterns?.

    Sometimes, however, the mathematical conception adds little of importance to the situation, and at other times adds something that is difficult to relate in world that has increasingly failed to teach mathematics properly to people.

    Theory of Mind:
    This is the most painful for me to express because I have tried hard to overcome this. I so desperately want to know what others around me are feeling.

    I have read on NLP, modalities of learning, books on body language and tone of voice, books on making conversation, books on conflict resolution, books on developing leadership skills, sociological research papers, and much much more. I have also tried out many of the techniques, and use web sites that can help me improve how well I read people. I've also had a coach help me make better eye contact, put more intonation in my speech, open my mouth better while speaking, and to breathe deeply from my diaphram to project better.

    I felt like this was helping. But, perhaps, I was building up an overconfidence in something I am still quite poor at.

    I say this because I have to teach a little bit every week, and nothing exposes a lack of theory of mind than having 15 to 20 students looking back at me and making expressions that I have no way of deciphering at the moment.

    I ask things like "does this make sense" or "do you understand", and of course they all say yes or nod their heads up and down (which even I know means yes, in the US). Other instructors are often able to pick up the fact that some students are just saying yes to save face (there is a deep furrowing of the eye-brows that I have learned to mean confusion, but there is little else). Usually, I have to follow up with a "test" example at which point, I will get students asking for clarifications.

    Perhaps, more painfully, is my mistaken reading of romantic interest from a very close friend of mine. To be honest, I had initially thought it was too good to be true, and perhaps I should have trusted that initial reaction.

    It seemed like she was getting jealous any time my attention shifted to another friend who came by, or she would get jealous when I talked about my dates. It seemed like she was ridiculously happy, and even giddy near the end of the night. She was talking about romantic movies, calling me a prince, talking about being true to oneself...that night, I felt like I fell in love, and I thought she felt the same way.

    But all this was based on reading about body language and practice on facial expression pictures and videos on websites...and frankly a little outside of the range of emotions they had you practice on. Perhaps, loneliness, combined with overconfidence in my learned ability to read people lead to my error in judgement.

    Worse, now, my lack of executive function is having me acting really strange towards her. I am acting in ways that are very unlike myself, and rather impulsive (though I would not say "spontaneous").
    Before you rush in and say that I am just beating myself, let me caution you by saying that the associated problems do not go away simply by wishing them to.

    Also, check out:
    http://www.ted.com/talks/temple_gran..._of_minds.html
    http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-aut...erger-syndrome
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=At4Vmo13vJE
    http://www.autismspeaks.org/

    *Since, I am no longer particularly interested in typology, and many of the people I knew here have stopped posting, I am searching for new forums. If you want to try this out with me, please join and add me.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    Based on my interactions with you, no. Based on this post, no, not really.

    People with Asperger's have a profound lack of social awareness, which you do not have. In fact your efforts to improve your social 'skills' and to better read people's reactions point very strongly toward being a normal, "non-Aspie" human being. If you had Asperger's it never would have occurred to you to do any of this. You never would have noticed a 'problem'.

  3. #3
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    5,932

    Default

    I ask things like "does this make sense" or "do you understand", and of course they all say yes or nod their heads up and down (which even I know means yes, in the US). Other instructors are often able to pick up the fact that some students are just saying yes to save face (there is a deep furrowing of the eye-brows that I have learned to mean confusion, but there is little else). Usually, I have to follow up with a "test" example at which point, I will get students asking for clarifications.
    If even after reading books on voice tone and body language you are still having problems recognizing emotions that seem pretty evident to other people, I think that suggests some form of autism.

    Males misinterpreting signs of attraction is a pretty common occurence though.
    -----------------

    A man builds. A parasite asks 'Where is my share?'
    A man creates. A parasite says, 'What will the neighbors think?'
    A man invents. A parasite says, 'Watch out, or you might tread on the toes of God... '


    -----------------

  4. #4
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    5,932

    Default

    But all this was based on reading about body language and practice on facial expression pictures and videos on websites...and frankly a little outside of the range of emotions they had you practice on. Perhaps, loneliness, combined with overconfidence in my learned ability to read people lead to my error in judgement
    How did you conclude that your reading was wrong? Did she directly state that she's not interested?
    -----------------

    A man builds. A parasite asks 'Where is my share?'
    A man creates. A parasite says, 'What will the neighbors think?'
    A man invents. A parasite says, 'Watch out, or you might tread on the toes of God... '


    -----------------

  5. #5
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    8w7
    Posts
    2,319

    Default

    Are you an enneagram 6? if so, you're probably also a hypochondriac.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    Based on my interactions with you, no. Based on this post, no, not really.

    People with Asperger's have a profound lack of social awareness, which you do not have. In fact your efforts to improve your social 'skills' and to better read people's reactions point very strongly toward being a normal, "non-Aspie" human being. If you had Asperger's it never would have occurred to you to do any of this. You never would have noticed a 'problem'.
    This is a very common misconception. Asperger's Syndome people are not freaks of nature, nor are they second cousins of psycopaths. Most actually do want very badly to connect and have empathy. Did you look at any of the Autism Videos I linked?


    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    How did you conclude that your reading was wrong? Did she directly state that she's not interested?
    She has in fact requested that I cease all contact with her. You cannot get more clear than that.

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Arendee View Post
    Are you an enneagram 6? if so, you're probably also a hypochondriac.
    I think all typology is mostly BS, but when I did the self-discovery process for enneagram, I was clearly a type 5. I leaned a little toward 5w4, but 5w6 was possible too.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    This is a very common misconception. Asperger's Syndome people are not freaks of nature, nor are they second cousins of psycopaths. Most actually do want very badly to connect and have empathy. Did you look at any of the Autism Videos I linked?
    I don't need to waste my time watching videos on the internet to know what Asperger's syndrome looks like.

    You asked the question and I gave you an answer. I'm not going to debate it with you.

  8. #8
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    I have to agree with ygolo. Many, many people with Asperger's syndrome DO have "conscious incompetence" about their social inadequacies and come up with rote ways to deal with them on their own. It's a spectrum and not everyone on it is extremely impaired. When my son was diagnosed, the psychiatrists did a lengthy parent interview, and when they would ask about certain behaviors a lot of the time my husband (never diagnosed) would answer "Yeah, he does that, but so did I when I was his age." At one point one of the psychiatrists gently pointed out that autism has a genetic component, and that the way we were answering the questions indicated that if the diagnostic criteria being used now had been in place when my husband was young, he most likely would have been diagnosed then. They said if he thought it would help, he could come back for his own assessment, but that usually by his age people with high-functioning autism who were never diagnosed or treated for it had come up with their own systems to deal with it, which he has.

    ygolo, I will need to come back and read your posts more thoroughly when I have more time to give you my feedback on them, but I will say that I've found autism to be characterized by "peaks and valleys"-- many people with autism will have areas in which they are ENORMOUSLY capable, and areas in which they struggle. Everyone has that, of course, but the person with autism has higher peaks and lower valleys than the neurotypical person. But in as many ways as it is an impairment, it can also be a gift. I wouldn't choose to make my son un-autistic because it would change who he is. And I like who he is, very much- but more importantly, he likes who he is.

    A side note: Asperger's has been subsumed into "autism spectrum disorder" in the DSM-IV but people are still using it casually- I don't usually, unless I think the person I'm speaking to will understand it better.

  9. #9
    Infinite Bubble
    Guest

    Default

    Maybe you just have a few traits of it. I for example have some of the traits, but would not consider myself a full-on Aspie.

  10. #10
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    That's a possibility- there are people who have some quirks that could be associated with the spectrum, but not enough or severe enough to be diagnosable. My daughter would never be diagnosed with autism, but she has some sensory issues that are often associated with the autism spectrum.

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] Am I an INTP? An INTJ? An ISTP? How do I tell?
    By mysavior in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-12-2012, 04:54 PM
  2. [MBTItm] Am I an ENTP or ENFP?
    By HeraldofHope in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-18-2008, 08:08 PM
  3. I am Not, an INTP
    By Anonymous in forum Welcomes and Introductions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-31-2008, 11:42 PM
  4. Am I an ENFP now?
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 03-30-2008, 04:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO