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View Poll Results: Would you choose to be a psychopath? l

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  • Yes

    6 18.75%
  • No

    26 81.25%
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  1. #31
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    You might be interested in this book and its author.
    I've been interested in Stoicism for a long while, but never took a serious look into it. I might actually try to read Marcus Aurelius' Mediation

    (Don't count on it though... I seem to have horrible focus when it comes to reading... since I was a kid)

  2. #32
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    @fia A lot of the higher earning jobs seem to "have higher counts of psychopathic people." Certain jobs tend to attract more psychopathic people than not.

    CEO is listed as #1

    Same list, different website.

    A lot of the top 10 jobs may require not having as much emotions as it can be considered a hindrance on your work. A surgeon having emotions while trying to do surgery sounds like tough work for someone who breaks down easily. Being a Psychopath just make it that much easier to breeze through these jobs because you are less emotional about your clients (some lawyers will take any case as long as the lawyer gets money, etc.)

    That is, you are either a psychopath, or REALLY good at controlling your emotions that makes you predisposed to these jobs.

  3. #33
    Member RoadPaveMent's Avatar
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    I chose 'yes'. Grass is always greener on the other side.
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  4. #34
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
    Firstly, I should clarify that what I said about semi-conscious routine is just that the psychopath's ability to successfully manipulate does not prove that they have deep emotional insight. Much of human functioning is the routine, so it isn't hard to understand that. I don't think a person needs that much insight to successfully manipulate in many instances.

    There is a distinction between some level of intellectual awareness about another person and emotional empathy. That alone is a complex issue because there are people with Aspbergers and other related neuro-atypical ways of processing that are not empathetic in the way that shares tears, but has much deeper insight because of their ability to intensely focus. There is also an empathetic motivation that can come from these ways of processing. I suspect there are many, many different forms of empathy and complex insight into subjective systems, but I'm yet to be convinced that this is what psychopaths possess.

    I may be a bit too tired to process this tonight, but what I am dealing with irl is a good case in point. Our dog is dying and may not make it through the night. There isn't really a way to fix it, but he has been looking into our eyes for reassurance. There is a sincerity of perception that he possesses that I'm not convinced a psychopath could convey. Even though I feel worried about him, I am attempting to convey comfort and stability and love. He has picked up on concern in our eyes, but has also felt reassured because it is difficult to fool him with falseness. It is just the genuiness of compassion for him that is his comfort. How does this fit into a model of lacking empathy? Could someone without it be able to provide the support in this instance? Fwiw, my husband is extremely "T" personality-wise, but he has no shortage of empathy. He processes and expresses it differently from me, but it is completely genuine. He is brought to mind because this dog is pretty much his son, so I'm concerned for them both. It is a difficult process. For my own way of processing, the felt compassion is the source of strength. It provides clarity and the ability to provide whatever is needed. It isn't a setback or an extra burden. Each person is different, so this topic is multifaceted and not binary in the least.

    I hope that helps to clarify a few points, but my intention is never to create a binary assumption about any of this.
    Why do you find it so hard to accept that psychopaths have advantages over normal people in careers that are rewarding in terms of finances and status? I know the "just world fallacy" is very appealing as all of us want to believe that people should get what they deserve, but that's not how the world works.

    One 19th century psychologist discovered that certain people have a "preternatural talent for immorality" and his descriptions of these individuals closely matched the modern descriptions of psychopaths. Let's face it, in things concerning power, status and wealth, it pays to be immoral. Many of us have heard of people who seem like they should be locked up in an insane asylum, but instead they're running a corporation or worse, running for office. We've all known at least one manager, clergy-member, a public service-person or a politician who is widely accepted as a paragon of humanity, compassion and personal integrity when he happens to be just the opposite of that.

    This saga is nothing new and even Plato wrote about it in the Socratic Dialogues. In the tale of the ring of Gyges, one has the option of being virtuous and regarded as profoundly immoral by others or conversely, to be immoral and be credited for being virtuous. Glaucon the sophist argued that most people would prefer the latter to the former and Socrates insisted that it would be wise to have inner peace at the expense of a damaged reputation. I would say that Socrates displayed a deeper understanding of human nature and that's why most people are uncomfortable committing abominable atrocities with impunity, but psychopaths are perfectly comfortable with it. Indeed, they are the ones who are commonly credited with being virtuous when they are just the opposite. It takes a certain kind of brain damage to lead a transnational corporation or an empire to crimes against humanity and who else is more cut out for this job than a psychopath? What sane person would opt to forever hold himself in contempt to honor his professional obligations as a CEO or a politician?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    I've written to you twice now to engage your humour and your emotions, but I have received no reply.

    So have you achieved psychopathy, or had it thrust upon you, or were you born a psychopath, or none of the above?
    None of the above, I have a conscience. Though I bet that if I did not, I'd be 10 times as good at my job and all other intellectual tasks I pursue. However, for better or for worse, I prefer not to be a moral degenerate.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

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  5. #35
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Being a psychopath may be a best-response in a society where psychopaty is present and thus the population has to constantly deal with potential psychopatic threats, which are generally successfuly countered only by other psychopaths (at least from a leadership perspective).

    It's not fully clear how psychopathy can be useful in a peaceful society which is not being threathened by outside forces. Your reasoning somewhat seems to imply an extreme division of mankind between "risk-taking psychopath" and "extremely risk-averse and fearful standard citizen", whereas there's a large continuum between the two.

    Anyway, I already have many of the listen traits so I chose "no" because I can't see their helpfulness on a large scale. Sure they make my job easier compared to some extremely coscentious and fearful colleagues, but apart from that?

    It takes a certain kind of brain damage to lead a transnational corporation or an empire to crimes against humanity and who else is more cut out for this job than a psychopath?
    I take this opportunity to frame my question more clearly. In a world where other corporations aren't run by aggressive psychopaths, would a given corporation need a psychopath as CEO? In a world where nations don't feel threatened by other nations led by ruthless leaders, would the former need a psychopath leader as protection?
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  6. #36
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I take this opportunity to frame my question more clearly. In a world where other corporations aren't run by aggressive psychopaths, would a given corporation need a psychopath as CEO? In a world where nations don't feel threatened by other nations led by ruthless leaders, would the former need a psychopath leader as protection?
    No, but that's not the world we live in.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

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  7. #37
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Okay. So, the natural consequences is, that psychopats are useful because a certain % of the population is psychopatic.
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryWalker View Post
    No, but that's not the world we live in.
    Yes it is. And all that's needed to end this shit is to stop taking shit from these idiot CEOs. The great majority of people tend to be decent, but all they do is look for ways to sit and complain. If they were to ever go INTP and just begin to see shit for what it is and not bother with it, then there wouldn't be this problem. Kill these idiots, not the next door neighbor that was rude to you. Just start shooting. They'll kill 20, you'll kill one of them, and they'll be gone. Why should a handful of shit warp everyone's reality to this miserable hellish world that is.

    The great institution that is government, laws, police, rules, regulations, and management was put in place to keep things happy and fruitful, and to keep this shit out, but alas, idiots abound and they just let this shit in, and sat around making excuses while this shit took over the very system that was designed to flush them all. Sometimes I think everyone is stupid. Especially when I go to clear the room of this shit, and all I'm met with are a bunch of idiots defending them, while saying I'm the one that's that shit.

    WTF?

  9. #39
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Okay. So, the natural consequences is, that psychopats are useful because a certain % of the population is psychopatic.
    Yes, but they were more useful when life was "brutish, nasty, solitary and short". Technically, they could still be useful in high-risk occupations that don't require fighting other psychopaths such as for example surgery, deep-water fishing or extreme sports. However, their services would clearly be less required as most jobs where psychopaths are in high demand require them to combat other psychopaths.


    Quote Originally Posted by CapLawyer View Post

    Why should a handful of shit warp everyone's reality to this miserable hellish world that is.
    How do you go about eradicating the gene that will just keep on bringing them back?
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryWalker View Post
    Yes, but they were more useful when life was "brutish, nasty, solitary and short". Technically, they could still be useful in high-risk occupations that don't require fighting other psychopaths such as for example surgery, deep-water fishing or extreme sports. However, their services would clearly be less required as most jobs where psychopaths are in high demand require them to combat other psychopaths.




    How do you go about eradicating the gene that will just keep on bringing them back?
    I don't want to eradicate any genes. By the way, you don't have to be a psychopath or a sociopath to act like one or to do the things they do. There are plenty of stupid, self-serving shits around. No shortage of that. And it's because of everyone's (often unfounded) fear of them that they continue to thrive. Instead of attacking the intellectual that pokes holes in your beliefs, you idiots, attack these shits. Get rid of them. Then look at yourself, and clear your shit up.

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