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View Poll Results: Are women more irrational than men?

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  • Yes

    12 27.27%
  • No

    27 61.36%
  • Kinda-sorta

    5 11.36%
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  1. #181

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Many want to be in the military because they see it as the only viable way out of bad circumstances. They don't want to get kicked out of basic, because they know the other alternatives are worse, while the military at least offers them a chance to better their situation. That it does, as the training is usually excellent and the experience worthwhile. You can do your few years, get money for school, and move on. Of course the cost of all that is often putting yourself in harm's way.
    I don't know as much about other soldiers motivations for joining. How many is many? I can only thing of one that I have even considered might be joining as a " viable way out of bad circumstances".

    Moreover, I was surprised to hear in recent years how much trouble many of the troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have getting civilian jobs. Employers don't seem to value military experience like I assumed they would, credentials don't transfer, and employers often worry that vets will have psychological problems like PTSD that will impede their performance or even make them a danger in the workplace.
    This is true. Seems like a disconnect between the civilian and military world. Though I suspect this pertains more to the army/marines than navy/air force. I am not sure about the coast guard.
    In any case, if the benefits so outweigh the risks, I would expect more middle-class and wealthy people to join up.
    Edit: Thought about it. I suppose most middle-class and wealthy folks have less incentive to join because they do have more options, but I don't agree that the benefits don't outweigh the risk.
    Last edited by TheStarchDefenders; 05-06-2013 at 06:06 AM.
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  2. #182
    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Emotions include things like happiness, anger, joy, grief, amusement, etc. They describe how one feels in the moment. Values include things like respect, efficiency, kindness, independence, honesty, etc. They describe things that might be important to someone. There is a big difference. They may be connected in that, for instance, if someone is telling lies about my friend, I might feel anger (emotion) because that violates my value of honesty, and calls on my value of loyalty. I can recognize and set aside the anger, though, to help my friend address the lies in a constructive way.

    Okay, well….then I’m going with emotion then. I managed to find one of the articles I’m referring to, written by Chris Mooney:

    The theory of motivated reasoning builds on a key insight of modern neuroscience (PDF): Reasoning is actually suffused with emotion (or what researchers often call "affect"). Not only are the two inseparable, but our positive or negative feelings about people, things, and ideas arise much more rapidly than our conscious thoughts, in a matter of milliseconds—fast enough to detect with an EEG device, but long before we're aware of it. That shouldn't be surprising: Evolution required us to react very quickly to stimuli in our environment. It's a "basic human survival skill," explains political scientist Arthur Lupia of the University of Michigan. We push threatening information away; we pull friendly information close. We apply fight-or-flight reflexes not only to predators, but to data itself.

    We're not driven only by emotions, of course—we also reason, deliberate. But reasoning comes later, works slower—and even then, it doesn't take place in an emotional vacuum. Rather, our quick-fire emotions can set us on a course of thinking that's highly biased, especially on topics we care a great deal about.

    Consider a person who has heard about a scientific discovery that deeply challenges her belief in divine creation—a new hominid, say, that confirms our evolutionary origins. What happens next, explains political scientist Charles Taber of Stony Brook University, is a subconscious negative response to the new information—and that response, in turn, guides the type of memories and associations formed in the conscious mind. "They retrieve thoughts that are consistent with their previous beliefs," says Taber, "and that will lead them to build an argument and challenge what they're hearing."

    In other words, when we think we're reasoning, we may instead be rationalizing. Or to use an analogy offered by University of Virginia psychologist Jonathan Haidt: We may think we're being scientists, but we're actually being lawyers (PDF). Our "reasoning" is a means to a predetermined end—winning our "case"—and is shot through with biases. They include "confirmation bias," in which we give greater heed to evidence and arguments that bolster our beliefs, and "disconfirmation bias," in which we expend disproportionate energy trying to debunk or refute views and arguments that we find uncongenial.


    Affect happens first and has an influence on how we make sense of what’s going on in front of us. It may not be particularly strong or even noticeable, but it happens first and no one is completely exempt.
    Reality is a collective hunch. -Lily Tomlin

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  3. #183
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    I know I've become like a traveling salesman for this book, but I really can't read this thread without thinking of Delusions of Gender by Cordelia Fine. It's just the best job I've seen anyone do in questioning the accuracy of all this gender psychology research.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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  4. #184
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    I know I've become like a traveling salesman for this book, but I really can't read this thread without thinking of Delusions of Gender by Cordelia Fine. It's just the best job I've seen anyone do in questioning the accuracy of all this gender psychology research.
    Is that the book which sets out to destroy books like Mars and Venus etc.?

    If it is I'm inclined to agree with its conclusions. I'm inclined to believe that a lot of the gender research is deluded anyway.

  5. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Because of the gender identification of biological sex males who identified as girls/women (and vice versa) could be detected by the corpus collusum at birth.

    That's why I'm one of those annoying people who say, "look people, men and women are equal, but they ain't the same and they ain't ever going to be." However, it also makes me a strong supporter of gays, transgenders, etc. because this stuff to be traced to genes, pheromones, and apparently even brain structure.
    Gays=Se+Fi???

    But this brain structure can not reproduction,so their genes should be very rare,I think not more than 2%...
    Occam's razor tell me I should believe reincarnation.

    As a T's,I think I am quite crazy for that.

  6. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Moreover, I was surprised to hear in recent years how much trouble many of the troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have getting civilian jobs. Employers don't seem to value military experience like I assumed they would, credentials don't transfer, and employers often worry that vets will have psychological problems like PTSD that will impede their performance or even make them a danger in the workplace. In any case, if the benefits so outweigh the risks, I would expect more middle-class and wealthy people to join up.
    Police,fire fighters,bodyguards are not civilian jobs?

  7. #187
    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Idiot thread is idiot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  8. #188
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unnamed View Post
    Police,fire fighters,bodyguards are not civilian jobs?
    They are, just like paramedics and other medical specialties where one would think military experience would be helpful. But military credentials in these fields don't always translate directly into the equivalent civilian credentials, keeping returning military out of comparable work without the time and cost of substantial retraining.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  9. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    They are, just like paramedics and other medical specialties where one would think military experience would be helpful. But military credentials in these fields don't always translate directly into the equivalent civilian credentials, keeping returning military out of comparable work without the time and cost of substantial retraining.
    I am quite sure prostitution,drug/human trafficking/,upload child porn,is most effective to earn money by low cost...
    oh ,just don't care what I said.Someone lead me think like that.

  10. #190
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    This sketch explains rationality's place in a woman's life remarkably well, imo.




    (wait for it)
    03/23 06:06:58 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:06:59 EcK: lex
    03/23 06:21:34 Nancynobullets: LEXXX *sacrifices a first born*
    03/23 06:21:53 Nancynobullets: We summon yooouuu
    03/23 06:29:07 Lexicon: I was sleeping!



    04/25 04:20:35 Patches: Don't listen to lex. She wants to birth a litter of kittens. She doesnt get to decide whats creepy

    02/16 23:49:38 ygolo: Lex is afk
    02/16 23:49:45 Cimarron: she's doing drugs with Jack

    03/05 19:27:41 Time: You can't make chat morbid. Lex does it naturally.

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