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  1. #1
    Epiphany
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    The Conscious Universe

    The Conscious Universe: The Scientific Truth of Psychic Phenomena




    This myth-shattering book explains the evidence for the veracity of psychic phenomena, uniting the teachings of mystics, the theories of quantum physics, and the latest in high-tech experiments. With painstaking research and deft, engaging prose, Radin dispels the misinformation and superstition that have clouded the understanding of scientists and laypeople alike concerning a host of fascinating oddities. Psychokinesis, remote viewing, prayer, jinxes, and more--all are real, all have been scientifically proven, and the proof is in this book.

    Radin draws from his own work at Princeton, Stanford Research Institute, and Fortune 500 companies, as well as his research for the U.S. government, to demonstrate the surprising extent to which the truth of psi has already been tacitly acknowledged and exploited. The Conscious Universe also sifts the data for tantalizing hints of how mind and matter are linked. Finally, Radin takes a bold look ahead, to the inevitable social, economic, academic, and spiritual consequences of the mass realization that mind and matter can influence each other without having physical contact.
    I've been reading this book recently and will periodically add passages that I find interesting to this thread.

    Psi is a term from parapsychology derived from the Greek, ψ psi, 23rd letter of the Greek alphabet which denotes anomalous processes of information or energy transfer, processes such as telepathy or other forms of extrasensory perception that are currently unexplained in terms of known physical or biological mechanisms. The term is purely descriptive: It neither implies that such anomalous phenomena are paranormal nor connotes anything about their underlying mechanisms.

  2. #2
    Epiphany
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    Remote viewing is a mental faculty that allows a person to describe or give details about a target that is inaccessible to normal senses due to distance or time.

    Military and Intelligence Applications

    ...military historians had already documented the use of remote viewing during World War II. After the war, secret British army documents revealed that the wife of the head of the Royal Air Force - her husband was known as the "man who won the Battle of Britain" - was a "sensitive." She was credited with using remote viewing to locate enemy air bases that conventional methods had not detected. Another key military leader, the American general George S. Patton, believed that he was the reincarnation of a Roman general, and General Omar Bradley agreed that Patton seemed to possess a "sixth sense."

    In the 1950's secret CIA-funded programs involving some psi research were code-named Projects Bluebird and Artichoke. In 1978 University of California psychologist Charles Tart surveyed fourteen psi research laboratories and found that five had been approached by government agencies interested in tracking their progress. During the Reagan administration, the House Science and Technology Subcommittee released a report containing a chapter on the "physics of consciousness." The report stated that psi research deserved Congress's attention because "general recognition of the degree of interconnectedness of minds could have far-reaching social and political implications for this nation and the world."

    Why was this topic supported for two decades, under the watchful eyes of highly skeptical CIA and DIA contract monitors and a world-class scientific oversight committee? For one very simple reason: remote viewing works - sometimes. The "hit rate" for the military remote viewers was not wildly greater than the results observed in the clairvoyance experiments discussed in chapter 6, but when conventional investigation and intelligence techniques were at a loss to provide critical information on sensitive missions, sometimes remote viewing worked spectacularly.

    For example, in September 1979 the National Security Council asked one of the most consistently accurate army remote viewers, a chief warrant officer named Joe McMoneagle, to "see" inside a large building somewhere in northern Russia. A spy-satellite photo had shown some suspicious heavy-construction activity around the building, which was about a hundred yards from a large body of water. But the National Security Council had no idea what was going on inside, and it wanted to know. Without showing McMoneagle the photo, and giving him only the map coordinates of the building, the officers in charge of the text asked for his impressions. McMoneagle described a cold location, with large buildings and smoke-stacks near a large body of water. This was roughly correct, so he was shown the spy photo and asked what was inside the building. McMoneagle sensed that the interior was a very large, noisy, active working area, full of scaffolding, girders, and blue flashes reminiscent of arc welding lights. In a later session, he sensed that a huge submarine was apparently under construction in one part of the building. But it was too big, much larger than any submarine that either the Americans or the Russians had. McMoneagle drew a sketch of what he "saw": a long, flat deck; strangely angled missile tubes with room for eighteen or twenty missiles; a new type of drive mechanism; and a double hull.

    When these results were described to members of the National Security Council, they figured that McMoneagle must be wrong, because he would be describing the largest, strangest submarine in existence, and it was supposedly being constructed in a building a hundred yards from the water. Furthermore, other intelligence sources knew absolutely nothing about it. Still, because McMoneagle had gained a reputation for accuracy in previous tasks, they asked him to view the future to find out when this supposed submarine would be launched. McMoneagle scanned the future, month by month,"watching" the future construction via remote viewing, and sensed that about four months later the Russians would blast a channel from the building to the water and launch the sub. Sure enough, about four months later, in January 1980, spy-satellite photos showed that the largest submarine ever observed was travelling through an artificial channel from the building to the body of water. The pictures showed that it had twenty missile tubes and a large, flat deck. It was eventually named a Typhoon class submarine.

    Scores of generals, admirals, and political leaders who had been briefed on psi results like this came away with the knowledge that remote viewing was real. This knowledge remained highly classified because remote viewing provided a strategic advantage for intelligence work. In addition, the agencies that had supported this research knew very well that the topic was politically and scientifically controversial. They had to deal witht the same "giggle factor" that has caused academic and industrial scientists to be careful about publicizing their interest in psi.

    Scientists who had worked on these highly classified programs, including myself, were frustrated to know firsthand the reality of high-performance psi phenomena and yet we had no way of publicly responding to skeptics. Nothing could be said about the fact that the U.S. Army had supported a secret team of remote viewers, that those viewers had participated in hundreds of remote-viewing missions, and that the DIA, CIA, Customs Service, Drug Enforcement Administration, FBI, and Secret Service had all relied on the remote-viewing team for more than a decade, sometimes with startling results. Now, finally, the history of American and Soviet military and intelligence-sponsored psi research is emerging as participants come forward to document their experiences.

  3. #3
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    Does the author give any references to back up that story?

  4. #4
    Epiphany
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    Quote Originally Posted by jryn1993 View Post
    Does the author give any references to back up that story?
    In the passage that I quoted so far, the author references these sources, though I didn't include footnotes in the quoted text so...make of it what you will.

    6. Anderson and van Atta 1989; Ebon 1983; Levine, Fenyvesi, and Emerson 1988.
    7. Mishlove 1993, 220.
    8. Mishlove 1993, 223-24.
    9. For a detailed description, see Schnabel 1997.
    10. Defense Intelligence Agency
    11. Schnabel 1997, 70-72; McMoneagle 1993.
    12. Jack Anderson and Jan Moller columns, Washington Post, December 23, 30, 1996, and January 9, 1997.
    13. For example, the Journal of Scientific Exploration (vol. 10, no. 1, 1996) contained several articles on the U.S. program.

  5. #5
    Epiphany
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    I feel the need. The need...for speed.
    Fighter Pilots

    A related, but completely separate source of military interest in psi comes from jet fighter pilots. The complexity of modern weapons systems, severe mission requirements, and the ever-present danger of enemy fighter jets and missiles have forced the development of extremely fastidious criteria for selecting pilots. Unfortunately, in spite of rigorous selection procedures and training, not all fighter pilots are equally effective. It is estimated, for example, that about 5 percent of fighter pilots have accounted for about 40 perfect of the successful engagements with hostile aircraft (i.e., "kills") in every aerial combat since World War 1.

    While opportunity plays a role in these percentages, substantial differences remain even after the "kill opportunity" is equalized. Jet pilots and aerospace engineers would like to understand what separates the "top guns" from the less-effective pilots. In 1991 researchers B.O. Hartman and G.E. Secrist published an article in a conventional aerospace medical journal with the euphemistic title, "Situational Awareness Is More Than Exceptional Vision." "Situational awareness" refers to a pilot's hypersensitivity to aircraft performance and ability to quickly anticipate and act upon changes during combat. In some instances, situational awareness surpasses hypersensensitive levels, and Hartman and Secrist compared this level of performance to psi perception. For example, combat pilot L. Forrester described superior situational awarentess as follows: "There is some sixth sense that a man acquires when he has peered often enough out of a [jet fighter cockpit] into a hostile sky - hunches that come to him, sudden and compelling, enabling him to read signs that others don't even see. Such a man can extract more from a faint tangle of condensation trails, or a distant flitting dot, than he has any reason or right to do."
    Detective Work

    When faced with long-standing unsolved crimes, police have occasionally turned to psychics for assistance. Well-documented cases of psychic detective work can be traced back to the early part of the twentieth century, and psychic detective work is still popular. Author Arthur Lyons and sociologist Marcello Truzzi from Easter Michigan University, who recently conducted a comprehensive evaluation of psychic detectives, report that some police detectives with exceptionally good crime-solving abilitites refer to their hunches as "the blue sense." Interestingly, one of the most accurate remote viweres ever to work on the CIA-sponsored psi research program at SRI Internatinal was a former police commissioner name Pat Price.

    There are many fascinating enecdotes of cases in which psychics seemed to be instrumental in solving crimes, but any neutral observer will also acknowledge that - as with psychic spying and most other anecdotal cases - it is extremely difficult to reach any strong conclusions about individual cases. However, given the strength of the laboratory evidence for psi perception, and the evidence from dozens of successful cases of military remote viewing, it is very likely that some cases of psychic detective work actually are due to genuine psi.
    Last edited by Epiphany; 01-27-2013 at 06:20 AM.

  6. #6
    Infinite Bubble
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    Looks like a very interesting book. Do you recommend it from the contents you have read so far?

  7. #7
    Epiphany
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    Quote Originally Posted by Infinite Bubble View Post
    Looks like a very interesting book. Do you recommend it from the contents you have read so far?
    Definitely! I'm terrible at finishing books though. This is about the third time I've checked this one out from my library.

  8. #8
    WALMART
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    Half of me wants to believe the zipper of reality isn't quite so hard set, that the increasing exponential fuzziness of the future doesn't collapse in the now, but perhaps across a hazy line. I would also like to believe that some of our minds are capable of probing those far troughs of uncertaininty, gleaning potentials unseen and funneling the never-real into physical certainty.


    The other half thinks it's all a load of shit.

  9. #9
    Epiphany
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    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    Half of me wants to believe the zipper of reality isn't quite so hard set, that the increasing exponential fuzziness of the future doesn't collapse in the now, but perhaps across a hazy line. I would also like to believe that some of our minds are capable of probing those far troughs of uncertaininty, gleaning potentials unseen and funneling the never-real into physical certainty.


    The other half thinks it's all a load of shit.
    A healthy dose of skepticism is reasonable. Unfortunately, as the author points out, the stigma attached to studying psi in the scientific community prevents many curious researchers from risking their reputation, credibility and funding to explore this phenomena, for fear of their work being labeled as pseudo-science. Such widespread close-mindedness inhibits possible breakthrough discoveries that could revolutionize our understanding of the human psyche.

  10. #10
    WALMART
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    A healthy dose of skepticism is reasonable. Unfortunately, as the author points out in the book, the stigma attached to studying psi in the scientific community prevents many curious researchers from risking their reputation, credibility and funding to explore this phenomena, for fear of their work being labeled as pseudo-science. Such widespread closemindedness inhibits possible breakthrough discoveries that could revolutionize our understanding of the human psyche.

    Luckily for you weirdos, I believe scientific progress will be made in the field via mechanical systems, such as quantum computing. I suppose we'll all have to wait to see what comes to fruition.

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