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  1. #101
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    Rights and feelings don't mix to begin with.

  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    Not really. It just means you've put up a lot of walls...

    And why would that be such a terrible thing ? Happiness is overrated. I find happy people insufferably dull. And rather scary. To live in denial is not much of a life, IMO.
    If it was possible to alter your brain (chemically/ structurally) so that you could never again be unhappy, there are people who would choose that... People lacking in character and depth.

    Still, good for you. It's awesome that you're happy.
    Faith is not a choice. It is a delusion.
    Apparently you are unfamiliar with how emotions work. Emotions are a response to our own thought process. Nothing more. Nothing less. That is why two people can go through the exact same experience and have completely different emotional responses to it. They think differently. You control your emotions by altering your thought process.

    One person sees suffering and is sad...someone you would call great character.

    Someone else sees suffering and is happy and excited by the opportunity to help...someone you would call delusional and full of walls.

    This does not even touch on victim thinking. Someone with victim thinking does not believe they have the power to change their situation or another person's suffering. They feel trapped like life is happening to them and not that they are the architect of their life. This causes depression and unhappiness.

    Someone with a strong locus of control sees that they do have the power to affect their own life and the lives of others for good. This sense of personal empowerment leads to optimism and happiness.

    So, do you still want to stand on your "unhappiness equals character" pile of horse hooey?
    Karmageddon - It's when, like, everybody is giving off these really bad vibes, and like, it makes that whole world explode, and that's like a real bummer.

  3. #103
    Senior Member Viridian's Avatar
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    If someone suffers from chronic depression, do you have the right to suffer from dysthymia (which is more long-lasting, but milder)?
    Tentative typing: ISFJ 6w5 or 9w1 (Sp/S[?]).

  4. #104
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    It's like when you say it's hot or it's cold and someone is always within earshot to say, "I'm from Texas/Alaska/Pluto etc, THIS is NOT hot/cold!"

    That scenario, like the one in the OP, gets under my skin because it's usually a stranger or an acquaintance saying it, and they just want to preach.

    Preaching is so yuck.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viridian View Post
    If someone suffers from chronic depression, do you have the right to suffer from dysthymia (which is more long-lasting, but milder)?
    What about someone who suffers from neither?

  6. #106
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrincessButtercup View Post
    Apparently you are unfamiliar with how emotions work. Emotions are a response to our own thought process. Nothing more. Nothing less. That is why two people can go through the exact same experience and have completely different emotional responses to it. They think differently. You control your emotions by altering your thought process.

    One person sees suffering and is sad...someone you would call great character.

    Someone else sees suffering and is happy and excited by the opportunity to help...someone you would call delusional and full of walls.

    This does not even touch on victim thinking. Someone with victim thinking does not believe they have the power to change their situation or another person's suffering. They feel trapped like life is happening to them and not that they are the architect of their life. This causes depression and unhappiness.

    Someone with a strong locus of control sees that they do have the power to affect their own life and the lives of others for good. This sense of personal empowerment leads to optimism and happiness.

    So, do you still want to stand on your "unhappiness equals character" pile of horse hooey?
    Emotions are just temporary states. If given the choice I would remove them completely from my being as I find them a destructive and dangerous addition to my makeup.

    If this removed any real satisfaction, but left a dull, neutral acceptance or contentedness, that would....be enough.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  7. #107
    Senior Member Viridian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGeek View Post
    What about someone who suffers from neither?
    What about them? They can have problems too...
    Tentative typing: ISFJ 6w5 or 9w1 (Sp/S[?]).

  8. #108
    Senior Member The Great One's Avatar
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    Counter question: What gives you the right to be happy when someone else is always better off?

  9. #109
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    the idea behind the saying is "don't take everything you have for granted, there are people who don't have even that, so you should be happy with what you have". ofcourse, all the statement that "you shouldn't be unhappy" really does is making you feel guilty about being unhappy, which will make you feel even more unhappy.

    however, the notion that under any circumstances, you don't have a right to feel what your feeling, makes absolutely no sense. its possible you shouldn't act on your feelings, or that you should seek where those feelings are coming from, especially if they are destructive, or perhaps stem from ignorance or a misunderstanding of the situation, or a projection from a different situation, or what things are might not be close enough to what things represent within your emotional reality to "justify" the feeling... but natural phenomena don't ask whether they have a right to exist.

  10. #110
    your resident asshole
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    Is there a name to this sort of fallacy? I love naming things.

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