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  1. #11
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    I'm kind of afraid of drugs and not really into them. I think all disorders, short of maybe schizophrenia, can be dealt with through counseling. My objections to drugs are: 1) don't trust them 2) side effects 3) dependency 4) avoiding the real issues instead of confronting 5) I like to own my progress, and I'm afraid taking drugs sorta compromises that ownership. My aversion to drugs bears some relationship to my aversion to alcohol as a means of self-help/coping. In moderation, alcohol can make you feel a shit ton better and drown out your problems, but you haven't, like Ivy said, addressed the underlying issues and you may have created some new ones in the process. Taking drugs in conjunction with therapy isn't as bad, but I'd personally give therapy a shot, first. I guess one could think of it as natural drugs.

  2. #12
    Occasional Member Evan's Avatar
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    drugs alone are never going to fix a problem. therapy alone definitely can.

    i don't understand this social stigma towards therapy: what's the worst that could happen by going? it's pretty much harmless. and having a place where there's nothing to talk about besides yourself for an hour long session once or twice a week is soooooo good for you. you don't have to worry about offending the therapist, or boring them, or asking them how they're doing. it's just all about you.

    also, they'll point out when you're using defense mechanisms, something most people aren't aware of too often. and if they're good, they'll know how hard to push you so that you'll face new things without opening up the floodgates.

    in theory, the pros massively outweigh the cons.

    the only cons i can think of are
    1. bad therapist
    2. money

    but it also costs a lot of money to stay on drugs for the rest of your life, which you will if you don't work through your problems. it's definitely possible to work through them without therapy, but it's guaranteed to be much much slower. years slower.

    but i'm not actually against drugs either. i just think you should start in therapy first. talk to THEM about the pros and cons of drugs. reassess whether or not you need them after a month or two.

  3. #13
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    Daily exercise in nature. I will never turn my back on it, because it keeps me afloat.

    Neither formal counseling nor drugs. It's always been better for me to talk to friends than to talk to a therapist.

  4. #14
    Occasional Member Evan's Avatar
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    then don't talk to a pompous one...

  5. #15
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
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    Yeah, don't talk to a pompous one.

  6. #16
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    I really think it depends on whether you have a lot of 'issues' that need to be sorted out - long term problems for example with a certain relationship, work, etc. or if it's mostly a chemical imbalance. If it's the latter, you might find a session or two with a psychologist useful more in terms of how to cope with having such a diagnosis, but I'd wait until after you got on medication. The longer you go without restoring your brains proper chemical balance the harder it is to treat. Often times when someone had depression/anxiety they have a lot of issues that bother them, after a few months on meds they realize that those issues no longer bother them and they had been a fixation, or blow out of proportion due to the chemical imbalance.

    Personally I've spent thousands on therapy for my anxiety, and have not found it particularly helpful. Example - I had a lot of anxiety about a job I had, and I would be freaking out about it all the time to my therapist but as soon as I got on drugs I could clearly see what a crappy place to work it was (no it wasn't ME), I had the strength to quit and find another one. The therapist spendt endless time going over my relationships with my boss, coworkers, even teaching me deep breather techniques to do in the car on the way to work. :rolli: The only success I've had with a psychologist was when I was having some issues with my son and we both went in and got some useful advice. If it's chemical (which is most likely is)...I'd try the drugs first. Then if you have lingering issues go to counselling.

    Good luck, please get treatment soon - it's no way to live.

  7. #17
    señor member colmena's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your input. You've certainly put forward a few things I hadn't considered, and have been very helpful.

    I've been prescribed Prozac, and have another appointment in two weeks to see if it's started to have any effect.

    There is a six week waiting list for counselling, and I don't want to hold it up further for people with acute depression or bi-polar.

    I'm hoping that the drug will give the gusto needed to get to a place where I can better develop. So that's generally some relief of poor self-esteem, listlessness, and apathy regarding my own future.

    I will post again if anything notable occurs.
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    Ti Ne Fi Ni

    -How beautiful, this pale Endymion hour.
    -What are you talking about?
    -Endymion, my dear. A beautiful youth possessed by the moon.
    -Well, forget about him and get to bed.
    -Yes, my dear.

  8. #18
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    Well, my view on the matter is scattered among different posts, so I'll just go ahead and just type it out.

    Research on the effectiveness of psychotherapy strongly suggests that longterm therapy is just as effective as longterm therapy + drugs for ALL disorders. I conclude from this that if you are depressed and it is interfering with your life, you should see a doctor about medication but also attend therapy. I see drugs as a band aid to the problem (so that you can function again) and therapy as the cure. The problem with antidepressants is that they take a short period to actually start working, so you will still have some downtime, plus not all medications work the same for all people. I think it comes down to this decision: Do you want to have to rely on medication to keep you non-depressed the rest of your life? Or would you rather try and fix the problem for good?

    I have suffered from two bouts of severe depression in my life so far; one was an episode after my recent surgery and another lasted from jr. high to high school. Depression really can be bad; I don't know how to put into words how horrible I felt in those days, but I can say that in some form or fashion I understand. Everything seemed hopeless, and I never want to go back to that again.

    I should also mention the distinction between longterm and short term depression. I started taking medication again when I was falling into depression after my surgery. I basically was bed-ridden and in pain for a while, and I just felt like crap. The medication really put me back in the game, and I stopped taking it after a couple of weeks and I was fine. I'm thinking this was only short term depression. Longterm depression is certainly a different story. In my case, the longterm depression (from roughly 6th grade to my junior year of high school) had a cause, and the only way I was able to overcome it for good was to deal with the problems that were causing the depression; which was essentially coming to terms with my sexual orientation. It haunted me since childhood, and then I hit puberty and went through a stage in my life that I can only describe as "dark times".

    Don't get me wrong, I think your specific situation will have a lot to do with deciding what the best treatment is for you. Note that I haven't really mentioned that some people have a natural chemical imbalance that gives them a strong predisposition for depression. I wish I had time to go over all the theories of depression from each school of psychology that I learned from my Theories of Personality class, but I'm at work so I don't have my book with me.

    Let me end by saying that I hope everything works out for you.
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  9. #19
    señor member colmena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    Research on the effectiveness of psychotherapy strongly suggests that longterm therapy is just as effective as longterm therapy + drugs for ALL disorders. I conclude from this that if you are depressed and it is interfering with your life, you should see a doctor about medication but also attend therapy. I see drugs as a band aid to the problem (so that you can function again) and therapy as the cure. The problem with antidepressants is that they take a short period to actually start working, so you will still have some downtime, plus not all medications work the same for all people. I think it comes down to this decision: Do you want to have to rely on medication to keep you non-depressed the rest of your life? Or would you rather try and fix the problem for good?
    I absolutely agree with you. What I'm hoping, is that the drugs will enable me to escape my current environment/situation so that nature, people, work etc. can provide therapy. I don't know how I'd get on living a 'normal' life, perhaps the drugs will get me to a place where I'm willing to give it a go.

    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    I should also mention the distinction between longterm and short term depression. I started taking medication again when I was falling into depression after my surgery. I basically was bed-ridden and in pain for a while, and I just felt like crap. The medication really put me back in the game, and I stopped taking it after a couple of weeks and I was fine. I'm thinking this was only short term depression. Longterm depression is certainly a different story. In my case, the longterm depression (from roughly 6th grade to my junior year of high school) had a cause, and the only way I was able to overcome it for good was to deal with the problems that were causing the depression; which was essentially coming to terms with my sexual orientation. It haunted me since childhood, and then I hit puberty and went through a stage in my life that I can only describe as "dark times".
    Youch. Sorry to hear you were afflicted so young. And I can relate to your long-term depression as my best friend in high school was the same. Such a heavy burden made him very isolated, distrustful, and insecure. It's frightening what a disease secrets can be.

    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    Let me end by saying that I hope everything works out for you.
    Cheers, Travis. Nice post.

    ---

    A friend and I have decided to write a script together. I thought it might be a good way to flex some creativity and work through subconscious issues. I think the site's called plotbot, perhaps some MBTIc members would like to have a go at one together.
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    Ti Ne Fi Ni

    -How beautiful, this pale Endymion hour.
    -What are you talking about?
    -Endymion, my dear. A beautiful youth possessed by the moon.
    -Well, forget about him and get to bed.
    -Yes, my dear.

  10. #20
    Senior Member bluebell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colmena View Post
    There is a six week waiting list for counselling, and I don't want to hold it up further for people with acute depression or bi-polar.
    I'm not sure how people are selected to go on waiting lists for counselling where you live, but my reaction to your comment is that while that is very thoughtful of you, I'd be inclined to let the medical profession (or whoever manages the waiting list) decide priorities. It is more than likely that if someone has an acute need for counselling, they'll be moved to the top of the waiting list. From what I've read, counselling is likely to be beneficial in identifying and addressing the underlying cause of the depression, so I suspect it's worthwhile to go to sessions as well as take the meds.

    Best of luck with it all.
    ...so much smoke pouring out of each chromosome.

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