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  1. #11
    morose bourgeoisie
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    I think I know what you are talking about. I have it too. Don't waste your time doing a bunch of internet searches trying to fix yourself. You can't fix this by yourself. You need (at heast one) professional with experience.
    I know what it's like to have your 'fight' instinct tripped by someone, and I know how this can put the blinders on you. Don't let going into a rage cause you to go to jail or worse.

  2. #12
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Great One View Post
    I've googled the hell out of this, and came up with nothing.
    Yeah, you're probably right, pardon my ignorance.
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  3. #13
    Junior Member aletis's Avatar
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    While I most certainly advise you to get professional help, either EMDR or CB therapies, I can share some strategies (really simple tricks) I learned.

    If you have experienced trauma, you have to know that part of you is still there, stuck in that moment, relieving it. It hasn't evolved or gained any perspective from what happened in the past, it simply reacts to present and distinct events like you were experiencing the same trauma over and over again. Knowing this, you can reach to that part of you and force you focus on the present and separate yourself from the past. The present is not meant to be equal to the past. What triggers the trauma is not the same exact event and, therefore, the outcome can be different. You can have control of what will happen this time. You're stronger and you have the tools to deal with such an horrible thing now.

    So, try to calm down, focus on the present, remove yourself from that environment even temporarily, go for a run or do something that requires your full concentration and pep talk yourself -- i can overcome this, i have control over this, i won't allow this to happen again, i'm capable of dealing with this, etc., etc. Try to do the things that you love the most. Eventually -- or hopefully -- new good memories will take the place of the bad ones and the monsters and skeletons will start to fade away. But you do need to want them to fade away first and foremost.

    Don't go through this alone, find someone with whom you can talk to or hang out when you're feeling worse.
    Last edited by aletis; 06-04-2012 at 04:39 PM. Reason: added info

  4. #14
    Member CreativeCait's Avatar
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    That's really hard about not being able to afford the therapy you need to get better. It sucks when you are stuck in the paradigm of 'I can't afford to get better, but if I was well enough to have a job I could afford it.' Hugs to you

    I don't have PTSD but I have had counseling for a traumatic event. Last year I talked through it using CBT and it really didn't do much at all....except to get me to be able to verbalise it. But a couple weeks ago I went through EMDR and it was really good for me. So I highly recommend that. It helped me to process and understand it better and not be dominated by the thoughts, images and feelings. I am definately more at peace now and less 'frozen' in certain contexts

    I really hope you can get the help you need. You are in my thoughts and prayers The Great One.

  5. #15
    Member CreativeCait's Avatar
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    Oooh, and in the meantime something that might help you is a way of dealing with it called "mindfullness"

    You aknowledge what is there and how you are feeling, but learn to direct your focus elsewhere and be able to function, even though the thing itself is still affecting you. Gradually, the more you work on it, the less power that thing has over you and what you can and can not do while affected by it.

    It's going to make more sense with a professional but this website has some free podcasts and youtube videos on ithttp://www.actmindfully.com.au/free_resources

    I bought this series of meditations teaching the skills of mindfullness for $10 (might be more your price range) and it was really helpful for me http://www.actmindfully.com.au/books...d=628&catid=54. It wasn't an easy magic fix tho, took months of practicing every day.

  6. #16
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    I saw some program about using drugs with aid on therapy and people got enormous help from using ecstasy in combination to therapy on ptsd. People told that they were able to process those things properly and while under the effects of ecstasy, they could do so without the normal panic/stress reactions they normally got in therapy. One veteran with really severe ptsd pretty much healed after few sessions, while no other kind of therapy had worked for him before.

    I also suggest looking at the whole jungian complex and individuation thing.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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  7. #17
    Senior Member The Great One's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    First of all,

    I think I know what you are talking about. I have it too. Don't waste your time doing a bunch of internet searches trying to fix yourself. You can't fix this by yourself. You need (at heast one) professional with experience.
    I know what it's like to have your 'fight' instinct tripped by someone, and I know how this can put the blinders on you. Don't let going into a rage cause you to go to jail or worse.
    Yeah, I guess I'm going to have to find some way of going to the doctor. I really think I'm going to avoid getting an aggressive sales job though like my last one. I don't mind negotiation usually but when someone tries to intimidate me into lowering a price it's like it brings me back to my trauma. I think I'm going to maybe try to get a less aggressive job until I can get over this like maybe retail sales or possibly like a non stressful secretarial job like I used to do. I'm not gonna try to swim with the sharks again until my gills are healed.

    Quote Originally Posted by phobik View Post
    Yeah, you're probably right, pardon my ignorance.
    It's all good.

    Quote Originally Posted by aletis View Post
    While I most certainly advise you to get professional help, either EMDR or CB therapies, I can share some strategies (really simple tricks) I learned.

    If you have experienced trauma, you have to know that part of you is still there, stuck in that moment, relieving it. It hasn't evolved or gained any perspective from what happened in the past, it simply reacts to present and distinct events like you were experiencing the same trauma over and over again. Knowing this, you can reach to that part of you and force you focus on the present and separate yourself from the past. The present is not meant to be equal to the past. What triggers the trauma is not the same exact event and, therefore, the outcome can be different. You can have control of what will happen this time. You're stronger and you have the tools to deal with such an horrible thing now.

    So, try to calm down, focus on the present, remove yourself from that environment even temporarily, go for a run or do something that requires your full concentration and pep talk yourself -- i can overcome this, i have control over this, i won't allow this to happen again, i'm capable of dealing with this, etc., etc. Try to do the things that you love the most. Eventually -- or hopefully -- new good memories will take the place of the bad ones and the monsters and skeletons will start to fade away. But you do need to want them to fade away first and foremost.

    Don't go through this alone, find someone with whom you can talk to or hang out when you're feeling worse.
    That's my other medical problem right now. I can't seem to do strenuous exercise (anaerobic exercise) without gagging right now. I'm really in a shitty situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by CreativeCait View Post
    That's really hard about not being able to afford the therapy you need to get better. It sucks when you are stuck in the paradigm of 'I can't afford to get better, but if I was well enough to have a job I could afford it.' Hugs to you

    I don't have PTSD but I have had counseling for a traumatic event. Last year I talked through it using CBT and it really didn't do much at all....except to get me to be able to verbalise it. But a couple weeks ago I went through EMDR and it was really good for me. So I highly recommend that. It helped me to process and understand it better and not be dominated by the thoughts, images and feelings. I am definately more at peace now and less 'frozen' in certain contexts

    I really hope you can get the help you need. You are in my thoughts and prayers The Great One.
    **Hugs back** Yeah, I'll find a way to figure things out. I'm not the kind of person that just gives up when things go bad: I fight on till the bitter end.

    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    I saw some program about using drugs with aid on therapy and people got enormous help from using ecstasy in combination to therapy on ptsd. People told that they were able to process those things properly and while under the effects of ecstasy, they could do so without the normal panic/stress reactions they normally got in therapy. One veteran with really severe ptsd pretty much healed after few sessions, while no other kind of therapy had worked for him before.

    I also suggest looking at the whole jungian complex and individuation thing.
    Using ecstasy sucks. It gradually prevents your brain from making serotonin overtime. I already have a serotonin deficiency, so that's the last thing I need.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    The core thing about overcoming PTSD is that you need to be and feel safe, then in time you'll just return to your original pre-traumatized self.

  9. #19
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Great One View Post
    Using ecstasy sucks. It gradually prevents your brain from making serotonin overtime. I already have a serotonin deficiency, so that's the last thing I need.
    okay, but the point of this is that you only take it few times and only during therapy sessions. it can help to relive the painful stuff, without the painful associations over it. this has been said to have good long term help, since those painful things need to be processed somehow, thats why they keep coming at you.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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  10. #20
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    ^I think there is debate about this. I've heard some more conservative therapists feel it has a bandaid effect, and can circumvent fully doing the work to get to the heart of the matter. Though it does seem to have some good short-term benefits.
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