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  1. #1
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Default Why Creepy People Give Us The Willies

    http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceno...he.html?ref=hp

    'The study, he says, highlights that "social norms are really critical to follow in order to establish a good bond with people." He adds that while people can consciously use mimicry to get in good with certain associates, they should proceed cautiously: "You can't do it too much, otherwise people are going to notice."'
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  2. #2
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Yeah, there's a certain feedback loop that gets established when people interact.

    Not only are people able to sense (well, most of the time) when someone is overdoing it in order to build a fake connection, but they can sense when they are not getting back the cues they expect. I'm very aware of social cues, and often I find myself responding in certain ways that I might not do totally instinctively but I want the other person to be reassured that I'm engaging them in a positive way. (So it's not enough to internalize feelings of goodwill; i try to make it visible to others from time to time, whether it's just a tone of voice, or facial expression, or body language, or saying thank you for something, etc.)

    There is a kind of synergy that develops, and either too many cues or not enough cues, and cues at inappropriate times throw off the interaction and unsettle people.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #3
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    So this explains why people hush up when I walk past and stare....

  4. #4
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    As we all know, this applies to only half of the population--those that have Fe. Those who have Fi are immune to this phenomenon.

    Sorry; I could not resist.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    "social norms are really critical to follow in order to establish a good bond with people."
    That's why John Wayne Gacy was so well-liked in his community.

  6. #6
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal+ View Post
    'The study, he says, highlights that "social norms are really critical to follow in order to establish a good bond with people." He adds that while people can consciously use mimicry to get in good with certain associates, they should proceed cautiously: "You can't do it too much, otherwise people are going to notice."'
    This article gives me the willies, or at least leaves me very unsettled. It is like trying to pin down a cloud, and makes some very broad assumptions. It assumes there is a standard set of social cues that everyone is able to perceive and will interpret in the same way. It also assumes people will personalize or internalize encounters like the ones in the study. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would see the contradictory behavior displayed by the interviewer as a reflection on them, and look beyond it to the actual substance of the exchange.

    Particularly disturbing is what this says about our interactions with people outside our culture or social group. Different groups may have different social cues, or at least different interpretations of the same behaviors. Are we doomed to consider such "outsiders" weird? No, because we are able to understand human diversity, and not jump to conclusions about inputs that don't match what is familiar.

    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    As we all know, this applies to only half of the population--those that have F in their type. Those who have T are immune to this phenomenon.
    Fixed. (I couldn't resist either.)
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  7. #7
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    It's the emotional uncanny valley!
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

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    Senior Member Snoopy22's Avatar
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    Perhaps creepy people get the jitters from the supposed non-creepy people.

  9. #9
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    Well the problem with this is that all people who don't pick up on social norms aren't necessarily "creepy" or "dangerous."

    Just some of them.

    Some people are definitely creepy, but others are autistic or something.

  10. #10
    Glycerine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    That's why John Wayne Gacy was so well-liked in his community.
    Along with Ted Bundy. Friends of people I know said "he seemed nice and charming". One of them was thinking about accepting his invitation but had her kids in the back so declined.

    So yes, case in point, many sociopaths and psychopaths know how to put on superficial charm and follow social norms for their own benefit. It's about getting what they want from others so many of them will use social norms and superficial rapport as a means to a specific end.

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