User Tag List

First 34567 Last

Results 41 to 50 of 95

  1. #41
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7W6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    4,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluestripes View Post
    this is very different. the talent for mathematics is a real ability, which manifests in the way one can solve math problems. and the class is going to be a real asset in that it is going to help them do this even better, and possibly serve as a starting point for a (very real) career in mathematics or one of the related areas.

    Real ability? The fact that you so openly discriminate leads me to believe that you have a low opinion of "Indigo children" like they are bad or not intelligent.
    You do realise that there are many forms of intelligence?
    Do you also realise that there are many (very real) careers of a spiritual nature?

    Quote Originally Posted by bluestripes View Post
    what exactly is "indigo"? it is nothing more than a word. and one that is so vague it can be filled with whatever meaning one wants to see there. it's like an open semantic slot. which leaves one free to over-idealize, to imagine one's child as having more gifts than they do, to turn a blind eye to faults of theirs which one doesn't want to see/wants to excuse, and to surround them with this overall "supernatural" (angelic, otherworldly, superior-to-others etc.) aura, which can be dangerous. fortunately, not everyone does this - but when it does happen, it can lead, at best, to bitter disillusionment when one discovers that one's child is too "ordinary", and not what one had thought them to be, and at worst, it can break the child's life.
    Pfft... you can say that about many words.
    I don't understand why you think these gifts are imagined, just because you do not like or understand something does not make it unreal.
    The thing is that everything you are saying can be applied when flipped to many other gifted children, ones that you consider "really gifted".
    For example the exceptional maths pupil who has social difficulties...shall we take them to social classes because it is a fault or negative trait of theirs?
    I'm not sure i believe in ordinary, people may have ordinary traits in some areas but will always have some that are not too. You can only isolate certain aspects that are ordinary and not lump the whole as ordinary.
    I'm sure this will continue....
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  2. #42
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7W6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    4,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    Indigo children are sooo 2005.

    Crystal children are where it's at now.

    http://www.crystalchild.net/

    Bizzarely this crystal children mini book landed in my lap one day, so i am familiar with the term and somewhat with the meaning.
    I had a look at that site and thought the below might be an interesting qoute to point out in this thread.....


    "Whether a child is an Indigo, a Crystal, is Intuitively gifted, has ADHD, all or none of these, is beside the point. The job of all caregivers is to support an individual child's needs. The most important step in that evolving process is understanding what those needs are. The only way a child has of teaching you what their individual needs are is through their behavior.

    The best way to change your child's behavior is to change your behavior towards them. The best systems of education and parenting grow and adapt with the needs of the child, not the other way around. "


    I'm inclined to agree for the most part.
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  3. #43
    Senior Member captain curmudgeon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    BIRD
    Enneagram
    631 sp
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    "Whether a child is an Indigo, a Crystal, is Intuitively gifted, has ADHD, all or none of these, is beside the point. The job of all caregivers is to support an individual child's needs. The most important step in that evolving process is understanding what those needs are. The only way a child has of teaching you what their individual needs are is through their behavior.

    The best way to change your child's behavior is to change your behavior towards them. The best systems of education and parenting grow and adapt with the needs of the child, not the other way around. "


    I'm inclined to agree for the most part.
    I'm also inclined to agree, and I think other people should as well. The only issue I could possibly take with this is that a child should also learn how to adapt to different people, so a parent should (and needs to be able to- for their own welfare as well as that of the child) be able to discern the fine line between bending to their child's desires when it is harmful or counterproductive, and properly assessing their child's strengths, weaknesses, and interests and capitalizing on the strengths and interests while taking time to work on the weaknesses. It's a very fine line indeed, and I think there are many parents that are clueless (or simply don't care) as to how this process ought to work.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Viridian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    MBTI
    IsFJ
    Posts
    3,088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    Bizzarely this crystal children mini book landed in my lap one day, so i am familiar with the term and somewhat with the meaning.
    I had a look at that site and thought the below might be an interesting qoute to point out in this thread.....


    "Whether a child is an Indigo, a Crystal, is Intuitively gifted, has ADHD, all or none of these, is beside the point. The job of all caregivers is to support an individual child's needs. The most important step in that evolving process is understanding what those needs are. The only way a child has of teaching you what their individual needs are is through their behavior.

    The best way to change your child's behavior is to change your behavior towards them. The best systems of education and parenting grow and adapt with the needs of the child, not the other way around. "


    I'm inclined to agree for the most part.
    Yes, but doesn't that idea - a very good one, IMHO - apply to pretty much all children? The "indigo" thing seems kind of... superfluous in that regard.

    Quote Originally Posted by wheelchairdoug View Post
    I'm also inclined to agree, and I think other people should as well. The only issue I could possibly take with this is that a child should also learn how to adapt to different people, so a parent should (and needs to be able to- for their own welfare as well as that of the child) be able to discern the fine line between bending to their child's desires when it is harmful or counterproductive, and properly assessing their child's strengths, weaknesses, and interests and capitalizing on the strengths and interests while taking time to work on the weaknesses. It's a very fine line indeed, and I think there are many parents that are clueless (or simply don't care) as to how this process ought to work.
    I agree with this as well. Parenting, ideally, should be an exercise both in heartfelt encouragement and in earnest criticism and boundary-setting, methinks.
    Tentative typing: ISFJ 6w5 or 9w1 (Sp/S[?]).

  5. #45
    Aquaria mrcockburn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ¥¤
    Enneagram
    3w4 sp/so
    Posts
    1,907

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McZerp View Post
    I think Indigo children are a ridiculous idea.
    Exactly. Friggin yuppies here...
    3w4-9w1-?w6 (nearly headless nick)
    sp/so
    Lawful Evil

    COCKBURN:

    http://sundrytimes.files.wordpress.c...tomic-bomb.jpg


  6. #46
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7W6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    4,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Viridian View Post
    Yes, but doesn't that idea - a very good one, IMHO - apply to pretty much all children? The "indigo" thing seems kind of... superfluous in that regard.
    Apply to all children differently according to their particular abilities, yes. Superflous...no.
    The reason being is that many of the "Indigo" children have been labelled (wrongly imo) in the past with negative labels and considered unintelligent or innately bad or unteachable. The positive i see in this label is that it gives children encouragement and praise who have been used to all the negatives of marginalisation.



    Quote Originally Posted by Viridian View Post
    I agree with this as well. Parenting, ideally, should be an exercise both in heartfelt encouragement and in earnest criticism and boundary-setting, methinks.
    Hmmm, no so sure about the heartfelt criticism. In my experience one of the best and most productive ways is this old adage "Ignore the bad, praise the good" Yes there are situations that you can not ignore...e.g your child running into the road when you have told them to wait (extreme example)... but really i do not believe that to critisize children is productive.
    There are better ways which are usually more effective.
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  7. #47
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Posts
    63

    Default

    I love *Indigo* children.....
    I have 3 of them,
    yay

  8. #48
    curiouser and curiouser bluestripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    MBTI
    Fi
    Enneagram
    4
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    Real ability? The fact that you so openly discriminate leads me to believe that you have a low opinion of "Indigo children" like they are bad or not intelligent.
    i never said that. i could have been considered one myself, except there was no such concept back then in the soviet union. this is exactly why i have an issue with this. to cut a long and boring story short, i was considered “strange” as a child (i have my own suspicions as to why, but i am unsure that i would want to find out for certain) and this was made into an enormous issue. i was “special”, school was not for me, so i was to be educated at home and graduate from high school in half the time necesary for others. i am going to omit the extremes, but, f i were to define my role in this, it would be “instrument for fulfilling others’ ambitions”. i was “not supposed” to have severe headaches due to the strain. i was “not supposed” to be depressed. the fact that i still was changed nothing. everything that did not fit into the image of me as some larger-than-human genius (which i never was) was conveniently ignored. i was not supposed to have faults, and i think the same would be true for whatever desires or feelings of my own. none of it was about me.

    THIS is what i am against. again, it doesn’t happen frequently. but it does happen.

    i suppose this is a matter of perspective, really.

    if you believe that indigo children are an actual, separate phenomenon, then so be it. to me, on the other hand, “indigo children” seem to be a diverse group, consisting of individuals with vastly different personalities, talents, needs and issues (adhd and autism spectrum disorders being some of the possible diagnoses), whom someone decided to gather under the same umbrella category simply because they might be considered “strange” or “not normal” and stand out in mainstream society. as such, it can be a resort for those who are unable to appreciate their child without a shiny “badge” attached and/or those who want to idealize him or her for their own psychological benefit.

    but, as i have already said: perspective is all it takes.

    and the fact is, the definition of what constitutes an indigo child is excedingly broad. it includes traits that can be found in most children, such as an overactive imagination, the tendency to be bored with homework or routine, repetitive activities, natural creativity, curiosity, the ability to absorb new information like a sponge, potential for developing intense interests which might include spiritual topics (if one’s parents are interested in this, or if one hears about similar topics in the mass media all the time, it would be all too predictable). or the combination of acceleration in some areas (one gets bombarded with information these days, so children learn about social issues, sexuality and other topics traditionally considered “adult” at a far earlier age) with difficulties in others (one might be very developed intellectually and informed about theoretical issues, but it takes a longer time to mature socially and emotionally, as this requires practice). if one wishes to, one could apply this label to, well, anyone. granted, one might have to stretch it here and crop it somewhat there, but eventually, it is going to fit.

    (the mathematical talent, on the other hand, is obvious, tangible and clearly defined. it couldn’t be confused with something else, e.g. a gift for drawing. similarly, it would be difficult to claim that it is there when it is not. for example, if a student has trouble solving an elementary arithmetical task, i doubt they would be called a mathematical genius. of course, one can always pretend, and some parents actually do, but this borders on being delusional).

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    I don't understand why you think these gifts are imagined, just because you do not like or understand something does not make it unreal.
    there is at least one aspect of this that i (un)fortunately do understand: being “unusual” in some sense and having others glorify this without my consent, so they could feed on this, emotionally, and feel good about themselves by extension. this is the sort of behavior i have an issue with. and exceedingly broad labels like “indigo child” can easily serve as an enabling factor (and i have a feeling that they do, in some cases).

    i might not understand the other aspects, of course.

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    The thing is that everything you are saying can be applied when flipped to many other gifted children, ones that you consider "really gifted".
    For example the exceptional maths pupil who has social difficulties...shall we take them to social classes because it is a fault or negative trait of theirs?
    i’m not sure what you mean here. i was talking about parents who idealize their children (i.e. see them not as actual human beings who possess both flaws and strengths, as we all do, but as near-infallible), then feel devastated when they discover that the reality is different from this ideal, as my parents did. you are talking about constructing a child’s strength as a possible flaw. what is the connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post
    I'm not sure i believe in ordinary, people may have ordinary traits in some areas but will always have some that are not too. You can only isolate certain aspects that are ordinary and not lump the whole as ordinary.
    i don’t believe in ordinary either. i am not even sure what it means. but the people i was talking about do (this is why i placed the word in inverted commas – “ordinary” in their terms, not mine). they think in dichotomies; either their child is the outright genius they want to see him/her as, or supernaturally endowed, for example, or (s)he is a nobody. there is no middle ground. if the child is not the former, they are going to jump to the conclusion that (s)he must be the latter. i have a feeling my parents are still struggling with the realization that i’m not what they supposed i was, which, to them, means i am a failure. the fact that i am not a failure by my own standards and do not see myself as such is of no consequence. my mother seems to be closest to accepting me for who i am, and to admitting that this is not necessarily negative, but it has taken us almost thirty years to arrive there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Viridian View Post
    Yes, but doesn't that idea - a very good one, IMHO - apply to pretty much all children? The "indigo" thing seems kind of... superfluous in that regard.
    seconded. you must have been reading my mind.
    "i love deadlines. i like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." (c) douglas adams

    "there are only two ways to live your life. one is as though nothing is a miracle. the other is as though everything is a miracle." (c) albert einstein

    "if only i could grow with my eyes - like these leaves - into the depth" (c) sergei esenin

    "god is in the details" (c) proverb

  9. #49
    Riva
    Guest

    Default

    1. Do you feel out of place in today's world? Nooooooooooo! Never!

    2. Do you perceive the world very differently from most of the people you know? NO!
    Everyone perceives the world in their own way. But acts somewhat the same (though think different.)

    3. Do you possess a deep desire to help the world by contributing or being of service in some way? Yes but everyone does.
    Everyone wants to change the world.

    4. Are you prone to insomnia, restless sleep, nightmares or difficulties falling asleep? Noooooooooooooooooooo! Never!

    5. Do you have difficulty conforming to the ways and norms of society? No!
    I find it hard to adhere to rules. BUt don't find the norms to be faulty.

    6. Do you feel frustration at the thought of leading an average life i.e. marriage, 2 children, picket white fence syndrome? No!!
    Infact I am looking forward to it. I love kids and would probably love my wife

    7. Are you intelligent although do not/did not necessarily achieve top grades at school? No If you can't take top grades, which means you fail to adopt to the curriculum given. Which is a failure of intelligence.

    8. Are you very creative in the areas of art, music, science and/or technology? I am average.

    9. Do you have several on-going projects at any given time and often multi-task? Yessssssssssssssssss!

    10. Do you have difficulty with authority: do you need to understand the reason behind what you're being asked to do? I don't find it hard to understand most things.
    This includes authority. But I don't exactly follow the rules. But I am not so unique to not even get a command thrown at me.

    11. Do you opt for leadership positions or working on your own rather than taking a team position? Yes to that one. But no again.
    I don't mind taking a normal position at al .

    12. Do you have enormous empathy for others, yet are intolerant of stupidity?No and Nooooo!
    I never find stupidity intolerable. I believe that is a misconception about ENTPs. About them being intolerant towards stupidity. ENTPs are intolerant (at least I am) t lack of communication. If you do not communicate one way or the other, it would probably make me lose interest and believe you are a failure.

    13. Have you had psychic experiences from an early age? Nooooooooo! Never!

    14. Do you have an intense interest in spiritual matters? No but yes.
    I do believe in a certain religion.
    And Kunfu. I believe in Kunfu.

    15. Do you have food or environmental sensitivities? Nooooooooooooooooooo! Never!

    16. Do you feel frustrated even hopeless at the 'old' ways of doing things in education, politics or medicine? Not really.

    17. Do you feel there is a better way of doing things but don't know how to make a difference in the world? Yes and No.
    There is always a better way of doing things.
    And the talent is not finding the better way but using it or making others use it.

    18. Do you have a strong intuition or knowledge of things that are unexplainable or do you often have a feeling that something is about to happen? No!
    I am not a pussy cat.

    19. Do you feel annoyed when you are around superficial people? Nooooo!
    I love difference. Except unclean smelly people. Now that I don't like.

    20. Do you have an intense desire for truth and honesty? Well, who doesn't?
    Except psychopaths maybe.

    21. Can you easily see through people's hidden agendas and facades? I am okay at it.

    22. Do you have an awareness of other dimensions and parallel realities? Nooo!

  10. #50
    Member crayons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Posts
    53

    Default

    The list of indigo traits are so generic they could apply to almost anyone. I think it's just people trying to be the specialist snowflake in the blizzard.

Similar Threads

  1. The so-called Mini-Ice age and "Global Warming"
    By heart in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 08-02-2009, 08:51 PM
  2. [SJ] SJs, what are your thoughts on the other types?
    By Dali in forum The SJ Guardhouse (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ)
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 02-01-2009, 05:29 PM
  3. thoughts on the Lenore model
    By Gabe in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-26-2008, 02:30 PM
  4. Thoughts on the Human Animal
    By Kiddo in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-12-2008, 08:27 AM
  5. My thoughts on the I phone
    By Opivy1980 in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 07-09-2007, 06:38 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO