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  1. #11
    Senior Member lightsun's Avatar
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    ‎'Misconceptions About Anger'
    “Divya, you have given a lot of thought and truly expressed the opinions you have. For this I give humble thanks as I search for true feeling, as well authenticity. (All numbered quotes are Divya Pup’s)

    (1). "...temporary but brilliant way to fight depression."
    In this I don't concur. I am from psychology and a human service history. Anger raises and can cause very high of a blood pressure. I totally am aware that different ways in coping are manifest. Each does best as he or she visualizes it, Unless other far more beneficial ways of handling anger can be embraced, one needs to do what they have incorporated.

    (2) "...we can avoid depression all together and the anger will subside in a while..."
    Again it is typologies for it does seem to work currently for you now. You apparently have not experienced clinical depression. I gave single counseling as well group functions. Many of these clients had anger, as well the depression. Anger can help propel a being, but it is not the healthy way. Nor is it a way of Buddha, who was extremely intelligent as well, had great insight.

    It also does absolutely not go with modern cognitive thought process. If one is angry they can be fooled an external trigger may be a cause. It’s an attack on one's ego plus a perceived attack of one's self image as well esteem. Either this or fear has been triggered.

    (3) "...right to be angry..."
    Everyone needs vent their turmoil, hopefully in a good fashion. Have the anger. Say approitiately 'I am angry, sad, have anxiety, and so on. Trick must be to not act on the emotions. They fool us; the real culprit lies down within us.

    (4) "But express it non-violently is quite healthy in my opinion."
    I explained that it will come to have heart attack or a stroke.” LightSun

  2. #12
    Senior Member lightsun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    I'll apologize instead, and ask that you Nevermind.

    Tiltyred, I give thanks.

  3. #13
    Senior Member lightsun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thalassa View Post
    Anger serves a purpose, just like any other emotion, and the purpose it serves is still valid.

    It's just that allowing one's self to get angry all of the time or to be ruled by anger is a betrayal of the self, and it's toxic. I lived with someone with an anger problem and I still respond too much from a place of anger at times from being around him (and not to mention my grandfather's ESTJ wife...who wasn't as openly angry...but I still learned the purpose of anger from her). I am working on being more balanced again, keeping my anger for useful purposes without letting it be toxic.

    Anger can be a great motivator and it can be a great strength. However, it can also be a poison if anger controls you.

    So I think your point of view is just as unbalanced as someone with a severe anger problem, though probably less dangerous, still not realistic or completely helpful.
    Thalassa wrote, (1)“Anger serves a purpose…other emotion…””…angry all of the time or to be ruled by anger is a betrayal of the self, and it's toxic.”

    “The only anger viable is if the physical body is in danger or coming to harm. Otherwise in the psychology field they have identified ten cognitive distortions and ten irrational ideas that lay under the subconscious and are causing you to feel irrational anger.” Paul

    (2) “...working on being more balanced again, keeping my anger for useful purposes without letting it be toxic.” “Anger can be a great motivator and it can be a great strength. However, it can also be a poison if anger controls you.”

    “I had an analogy where the car’s warning lights are on in periods of anger. The point is there are two elements, One cognitive discrepancies in reason abound and two it is an indication of some unresolved conflict of your own being triggered. The pro is it can be a motivator however when one is balanced they can be disciplined and without the need of anger as fuel.” Paul

  4. #14
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Anger is probably the emotion people try to suppress and deny the most, and yet it is also the emotion that cannot be suppressed. It will surface in some way, no matter how indirect or passive its expression. If you are angry, you will express it consciously or unconsciously. All we can do is learn how to process it and channel it. It functions like a river that has a force to flow, so we can direct it.

    I've heard a definition that anger is feeling our rights are violated. In its healthy form, it is the emotion that helps us feel the boundaries of "self" when harmed. Without any anger, we can lose a sense of self completely. This becomes evident for people who have been horribly violated, but do not feel 'allowed' to express anger towards the violator. Instead that anger is channeled to something less scary like when a child was abused by a parent, cannot feel/express anger towards their parent, so they take it out on a spouse or even their own children, or they take it out on strangers. Instead anger can be channeled inward for self-loathing where we agree with the oppressor and share in their anger towards our selves instead of pushing it back towards them. Without anger, we cannot feel the outer boundaries of our self-concept when violated. Feeling no anger can mean feeling one has no rights. Lose all anger, lose all of self.

    There is also a principle in psychology that says if you avoid something at all costs, it becomes scarier. Also, if you fixate on something completely, it becomes scarier. So, there is a way we need to look anger straight in the eye, direct it back to its source as honestly and clearly as possible, find constructive ways to express it through correcting the problem, through physical activity, creative work, or other constructive work, and then try to let it go once it is given the respect to run its course.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.
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  5. #15
    Sauvage Glados's Avatar
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    How can you possibly betray yourself by experiencing something which is a part of yourself in spontaneity? I hate the way how psychology can sometimes be reduced to a way to perceive the world with rose-tinted glasses. Anger is something which is encrypted in our existence for a long, long time and saying that it is toxic is actually can lead someone to a denial of self.

    Anger is not toxic when you need to experience it or when it fuels you to experience itself, suppressing that anger with a phony sense of calmness is ironically the toxic thing here.

    The psychology of an individual is surprisingly connected to linguistics, in many, many ways. Heh.
    Mercifulness is not a trait that the weak can possess. The world is full of idiots who like to think that they are merciful in order to forget that they actually are weak.
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  6. #16
    Wei 18 - Sie 39 agentwashington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glados View Post
    How can you possibly betray yourself by experiencing something which is a part of yourself in spontaneity? I hate the way how psychology can sometimes be reduced to a way to perceive the world with rose-tinted glasses. Anger is something which is encrypted in our existence for a long, long time and saying that it is toxic is actually can lead someone to a denial of self.

    Anger is not toxic when you need to experience it or when it fuels you to experience itself, suppressing that anger with a phony sense of calmness is ironically the toxic thing here.

    The psychology of an individual is surprisingly connected to linguistics, in many, many ways. Heh.
    Yes.

    ... I was gonna say something but I figured the poster was probably that one guy who's nearly impossible to decrypt.

    A pragmatic approach towards emotions is always the best, IMO. You can't just spiritualise everything. That's not how actual psychology works.
    “Don’t use your strength to oppress, (but also) don’t let your weakness make you feel helpless.”
    - Rurouni Kenshin

    “This world is beautiful. People can love each other and live life respecting each other. Someday everyone will come to realize that and this will become a beautiful world full of only such people.”
    - Kino no Tabi

  7. #17
    Wei 18 - Sie 39 agentwashington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labyrinthine View Post
    Anger is probably the emotion people try to suppress and deny the most, and yet it is also the emotion that cannot be suppressed. It will surface in some way, no matter how indirect or passive its expression. If you are angry, you will express it consciously or unconsciously. All we can do is learn how to process it and channel it. It functions like a river that has a force to flow, so we can direct it.

    I've heard a definition that anger is feeling our rights are violated. In its healthy form, it is the emotion that helps us feel the boundaries of "self" when harmed. Without any anger, we can lose a sense of self completely. This becomes evident for people who have been horribly violated, but do not feel 'allowed' to express anger towards the violator. Instead that anger is channeled to something less scary like when a child was abused by a parent, cannot feel/express anger towards their parent, so they take it out on a spouse or even their own children, or they take it out on strangers. Instead anger can be channeled inward for self-loathing where we agree with the oppressor and share in their anger towards our selves instead of pushing it back towards them. Without anger, we cannot feel the outer boundaries of our self-concept when violated. Feeling no anger can mean feeling one has no rights. Lose all anger, lose all of self.
    Yeah

    also this
    ironically benefits people who stand to gain from exploiting us

    i hate the 'peaceful' 'spirituality' shit so much
    “Don’t use your strength to oppress, (but also) don’t let your weakness make you feel helpless.”
    - Rurouni Kenshin

    “This world is beautiful. People can love each other and live life respecting each other. Someday everyone will come to realize that and this will become a beautiful world full of only such people.”
    - Kino no Tabi
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  8. #18
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
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    I stopped reading the original post when I saw anger being compared to psychosis. Anger and psychosis have nothing to do with each other. People with anger can be clear-minded, and someone with psychosis is not angry or destructive but merely suffers from hallucinations and delusions.
    [ Ni > Ti > Fe > Fi > Ne > Te > Si > Se ][ 4w5 sp/sx ][ RLOAI ][ IEI-Ni ]
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  9. #19
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polaris View Post
    I stopped reading the original post when I saw anger being compared to psychosis. Anger and psychosis have nothing to do with each other. People with anger can be clear-minded, and someone with psychosis is not angry or destructive but merely suffers from hallucinations and delusions.
    Glad I wasn't the only person who read it that way.
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

  10. #20
    Ambience seeker burningranger's Avatar
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    Anger is the most natural thing in the world. All of my failtures in life I can attribute to an unwillingness to experience or my outright DENIAL of subconscious anger. For a 9, that shit is there but we are asleep to it....that's why we can sometimes be so uncaring and blasé about our own life...Anger is a natural impulse of the soul in the face of what we find unacceptable. If you accept everything in life like a hindu cow 9 times out of 10 you are just in deep denial of what you really find ok and what you don't. That being said OF COURSE there's a darker side to anger...like ANY emotion.

    We wouldn't be able to control people if we allowed everyone to expresse their anger.
    You are the only possible steward of what your soul deems as right and wrong...so you should always be on your own side before anyone else...alive or dead.
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