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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    If you can't explain everything you see on a daily basis, then do you experience unexplained phenomena routinely?
    I confess that I have no idea how my parent's cappuccino machine works, but I believe in it!



    Relevance? ... arguable, but questionable.
    "The purpose of life is to be defeated by greater and greater things." - Rainer Maria Rilke

  2. #12
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwakar View Post
    I confess that I have no idea how my parent's cappuccino machine works, but I believe in it!



    Relevance? ... arguable, but questionable.
    You could be drinking dragon urine...

  3. #13
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I've experienced some ... I guess you would call it telepathy ... but not in a long time. I dreamed that my boyfriend and I were in a grocery store and there was a ginger cat in the store and he said something about "La Peliroja," which is "the redhead" in Spanish. The next day, he showed up at my door with a box of henna in his hand, and we got in the shower and put henna on each other's hair. With this same person, I used to work a night shift and it was long and slow most nights, and I was ruminating over a fight we'd had. The next day he asked me why I was so mad at him at 5 in the morning. And once I was on foot, lost, in the middle of the night, no money for a cab, and some lady I'd never seen before showed up in her car and told me to get in and she'd drive me home. I noticed she was in her nightgown and slippers and I asked her why she was riding around in her nightclothes. She said she had been sound asleep when something told her to get up and drive down the street, so she did, and as soon as she saw me, she knew why. There are some other things, but those are the sharpest, to me, most clearly "something going on." I do dream about people sometimes and they come to see me the next day. But it hasn't happened to me in a long time now, which I'm kind of glad for.

    Oh, I know another one -- but this is of my dad -- I was dating someone that my dad was not aware of, had never met, didn't even know I was dating him -- he proposed to me one night. He was very drunk and it was out of the blue, and he told me all this stuff about how he owed a house in another state and he had all this money, all very improbable and kind of disturbing, I think I said I'd think about it, I can't remember -- but the next day, my dad asked me who is Harold? I said it was this weird guy I'd been seeing, but he goes by Hal, why? and my dad said he had woken up in the middle of the night with something yelling in his head "NO HAROLD! NO HAROLD!" (I didn't marry Hal.)

  4. #14
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I might guess that the woman in the OP had unconsciously picked up on indirect signs that these people might die (maybe through things people said or did regarding these people), and then her subconscious fed the fear of their death back to her via a dream. Dreams tend to be expressions from our subconscious of what we fear/hope, and it may appear to be a "prediction" when/if it actually happens, but really it's just that your fear/hope was founded in reality; you simply did not consciously note the info in reality that made up the fear/hope.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

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  5. #15
    Senior Member Lex Talionis's Avatar
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    Well, it is not a hidden fact that our scientific knowledge is hardly all-encompassing. There are innumerable phenomena that we do not come close to understanding, and who knows how many that we are not even aware of—especially in the field of neuroscience. From what relatively little we do comprehend regarding brain function, it is already quite apparent that our perceptions can be altered by even minor fluctuations in normal brain activity. Therefore, it would be entirely fallacious to conclude that because no rational explanation exists (and I believe that in the overwhelming majority of cases a rational explanation does exist) we should attribute the expression of unexplained phenomena to superstition.

    In addition, that there have been numerous reported cases of "supernatural" experiences by otherwise "sane" individuals does not in any way justify the acceptance of supernatural causality. "Strange" experiences are not limited to those who are insane; what differentiates the sane from the insane, in my view, is the defiant refusal or inability to accept contradictory evidence by the latter. Sound mental health does not, in and of itself, preclude the possibility of giving in to irrational explanations, and it most certainly does not prevent us from entertaining such notions.
    "Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily."
    —Bonaparte

  6. #16
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lex Talionis View Post
    Well, it is not a hidden fact that our scientific knowledge is hardly all-encompassing. There are innumerable phenomena that we do not come close to understanding, and who knows how many that we are not even aware of—especially in the field of neuroscience. From what relatively little we do comprehend regarding brain function, it is already quite apparent that our perceptions can be altered by even minor fluctuations in normal brain activity. Therefore, it would be entirely fallacious to conclude that because no rational explanation exists (and I believe that in the overwhelming majority of cases a rational explanation does exist) we should attribute the expression of unexplained phenomena to superstition.

    In addition, that there have been numerous reported cases of "supernatural" experiences by otherwise "sane" individuals does not in any way justify the acceptance of supernatural causality. "Strange" experiences are not limited to those who are insane; what differentiates the sane from the insane, in my view, is the defiant refusal or inability to accept contradictory evidence by the latter. Sound mental health does not, in and of itself, preclude the possibility of giving in to irrational explanations, and it most certainly does not prevent us from entertaining such notions.
    I agree.

  7. #17
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    When i was about 10years old, i went to hungary with my mom. we were in some small town and decided to go take a walk in a forest. we saw this small tree that was waving one of its branches(like 25cm from side to side). both of us went like wtf, and spent like 15-20 mins trying to figure out how this branch was waving around, there was no wind that could had done this, we werent jumping on its roots or anything and when i stopped it, it slowly started doing it again. as far as i know, trees arent supposed to be moving.. i think it was birch or aspen.

    Also when i was little my mom had a dream where lots of people were drowning, next morning she heard about this ship sinking http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Estonia , 852 people died.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
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  8. #18
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    My father and a friend once visited someone that claimed to be psychic. To put it to the test, my father gave him one deer antler he found in the woods and asked him if he could say where the other one was. The man took the antler in his hands and started to focus, told my father he saw fire, lots of fire. And a very big oak tree, the antler supposedly was still lying next to that oak tree.

    My father found the first antler in a forested area where there had been a big forest fire a few years back, being part of the local fire department he knew that right away, so he was intruigued by the story about the fire the guy had seen, without knowing where my father found the antler in the first place. But he was still skeptical, my fathers friend was curious so tried to look for the other antler, and found it a few days later right next to a large oak tree, one of the largest in that area.

    That's how my father tells the story. But personally I'm skeptical. My fathers friend is a rather peculiar person and I wouldn't be surprised if he set it all up for my father to believe.


    As for myself, I experienced a very vivid dream that seemed to come true that same morning, even more so than your average deja-vu. At least that is how I remember it now. But I came to believe that it could very well have been a very abstract dream, and the real life experience filled up the gaps for me. Making me think that was exactly what I had dreamt, without it actually being true. The dream was just a similar experience or had a similar emotional response and my memory buffers just shorted out and were overwritten. I believe the same can be said about other deja-vu feelings. When there are certain similarities, our minds may create links and actually alter memories. Making us think we've seen/heard or been there before, without it actually being true.

    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post

    Also when i was little my mom had a dream where lots of people were drowning, next morning she heard about this ship sinking http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Estonia , 852 people died.
    I also think this is pretty much the same as my dream. Your mother likely dreamt about something that had a similar emotional response, but she couldn't quite remember it, then heard about the accident with people drowning and her mind remembers it as if that was what she dreamt about.

    Unless she told the dream in detail before learning about the accident. Then I don't have an explanation. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  9. #19
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I'm ok with not knowing how or why.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    I'm ok with not knowing how or why.
    I agree.

    I'm happy knowing/believing what i do and feel no need to make others understand.

    My psychic is coming round tomorrow to do a reading for me
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

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