User Tag List

View Poll Results: Are you in favor of homeschooling?

Voters
50. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    32 64.00%
  • No

    11 22.00%
  • Unopinionated/other (explain)

    7 14.00%
First 678910 Last

Results 71 to 80 of 92

  1. #71
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grayscale View Post
    im going to go out on a limb here and say this is the sort of thing children should be exposed to. perhaps not to such an extent, regardless, the controlled confines of home and family are not a good example of the wide variety of things and people that children will run into in the outside world, making it an inadequate venue of preparation for adulthood. i feel it is the responsibility of parents to prepare their children for the "real world", and, in that regard, schooling outside of the home is a far more immersive example of reality. whether i can personally oversee little billy doing his math homework comes secondary to this, in my opinion.

    of course proponents of homeschooling are going to disagree with this, most of them either were homeschooled or homeschool their children. what i am saying, though, is that there is simply no intention of homeschooling that isn't "sheltering" in some way.
    I'm thinking judicious sheltering from some things is an integral part of parenting. It's a matter of navigating the territory in between extremes, allowing them to experience reality but also protecting them from reality that can permanently alter their future opportunities.

    As an adult, I can shelter myself by choosing not to associate with people I can't stand or situations I find untenable. I am super, super thankful that my parents gave me the opportunity to have some practice at making those sorts of choices as I matured. THAT is "real life" and IMO I experienced more of it than most people.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  2. #72
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    TIGR
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    5,936

    Default

    I also want to make it very clear that all of our children are socialized. I mean come on, with me as their mother how could they not be?

    Each morning we go to the gym where there are excellent programs for both my son and three year old daughter. When we aren't there our kids are always playing out front with the other children in our neighborhood. We purposely moved to where we lived because of the family atmosphere. Family day at the Y is coming up, field trips, swimming, park, etc. Tons to do!

    I will say this. Had I been asked 11 years ago if I'd be married with three kids I'd have said absolutely not! I'd also scoff at the mere mention of homeschooling never mind the mention of getting married or having kids. If you're not in the boat then don't try paddling cuz ya can't! haha, I made that up myself. ;P
    Time is a delicate mistress.

  3. #73
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    istp
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I'm thinking judicious sheltering from some things is an integral part of parenting. It's a matter of navigating the territory in between extremes, allowing them to experience reality but also protecting them from reality that can permanently alter their future opportunities.

    As an adult, I can shelter myself by choosing not to associate with people I can't stand or situations I find untenable. I am super, super thankful that my parents gave me the opportunity to have some practice at making those sorts of choices as I matured. THAT is "real life" and IMO I experienced more of it than most people.
    i guess the question becomes, then, whether any aspect of public schooling is going to permanently alter children for the worse.

    obviously, we shouldnt throw children in the ocean just to teach them to swim, but anything we can teach them to handle without permanently damaging them will be beneficial in the long run. id rather my kids get through as many of life's hardships while under my care as possible, because i cant be there their entire life. a difficult thing to do as a parent, i understand, to allow temporary hardship (im sure it doesnt make them more popular, either!) for the greater good.

    moreover, its not that i disagree with the concept of homeschooling, just how ive seen it done and how unadjusted the homeschooled children that ive met are. the issue is more universal to me, it's this topic of over-nurturing children. although i would guess it is entirely possible for parents to home-school their children and not do this, if homeschooling is a symptom of over-nurturing, it's unlikely.

  4. #74
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INfj
    Posts
    3,741

    Default

    You do not need to be homeschooled to get a case of being over-nurtured. Although I do suppose that children homeschooled might have a tendency to be over-protected. I think it's just about exposure... as long as the parents are aware that their kids might have difficulty adjusting to "life afterwards" be it secondary schooling or what have you... and actually give them the opportunity to practice working with others. Not just socializing... but actually working with people they don't know well. I don't see why homeschooling cannot be done.

  5. #75
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    istp
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    You do not need to be homeschooled to get a case of being over-nurtured.
    a very good point...

    are the benefits that the focused education that home-schooling offers greater than the exposure offered by public schooling? does private schooling fit between the two? how so?

    this is where i think opinions may lay... im inclined to favor the added exposure, others may not be. the reasoning behind my opinion is that what could be learned outside of classical subjects is more useful towards general living... the classical subjects themselves seem to be aimed at standardized testing and continued education, which are important as well.

    i can certainly see the flip side here, it's a tough call.

  6. #76
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grayscale View Post
    a very good point...

    are the benefits that the focused education that home-schooling offers greater than the exposure offered by public schooling? does private schooling fit between the two? how so?

    this is where i think opinions may lay... im inclined to favor the added exposure, others may not be. the reasoning behind my opinion is that what could be learned outside of classical subjects is more useful towards general living... the classical subjects themselves seem to be aimed at standardized testing and continued education, which are important as well.

    i can certainly see the flip side here, it's a tough call.
    My problem with your argument is that you're treating them as three monolithic options. PUBLIC, PRIVATE, HOMESCHOOL. Well, there are some awesome public schools, and some terrible ones. Some are great for some kids but not others. There are some really bad homeschoolers and some really awesome ones, as well as some kids who wouldn't thrive in homeschool even with the best most well-prepared parents ever. Sometimes a kid would thrive in homeschool but the parent isn't suited to it. And private school- well, there are good ones and bad ones, just like public. Even if it's a fantastic private school, sometimes the expense puts a burden on the family that negates the benefit offered by the school.

    So, to me, you really can't say "Homeschooling is bad" OR "Public schools are failing" and be right about any given homeschooling family or public school. Especially now that there is more choice given to families about where kids can go- we chose a charter school which is SO much more in line with my philosophy of education than any of our district's public options, and yet it's still a free public school. When my daughter starts middle school, my son will be entering Kindergarten we'll have two more decisions to make. If we can't make the choices available to us fit our life for both kids, it's very possible that I would homeschool one of them and send the other to an outside school (probably a charter).
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  7. #77
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    TIGR
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    5,936

    Default

    Good post nighting. We're pretty honest with our children. I don't want them growing up and leaving the nest only to be overly surprised at how the world really operates.

    I wasn't home schooled, but my ISFJ Mother was so overprotected that when I eventually did get out from under her grip I had a rude awakening. I believe the person you grow up to be has a lot to do with your parents and your upbringing.
    Time is a delicate mistress.

  8. #78
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    istp
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    My problem with your argument is that you're treating them as three monolithic options. PUBLIC, PRIVATE, HOMESCHOOL. Well, there are some awesome public schools, and some terrible ones. Some are great for some kids but not others. There are some really bad homeschoolers and some really awesome ones, as well as some kids who wouldn't thrive in homeschool even with the best most well-prepared parents ever. Sometimes a kid would thrive in homeschool but the parent isn't suited to it. And private school- well, there are good ones and bad ones, just like public. Even if it's a fantastic private school, sometimes the expense puts a burden on the family that negates the benefit offered by the school.

    So, to me, you really can't say "Homeschooling is bad" OR "Public schools are failing" and be right about any given homeschooling family or public school. Especially now that there is more choice given to families about where kids can go- we chose a charter school which is SO much more in line with my philosophy of education than any of our district's public options, and yet it's still a free public school. When my daughter starts middle school, my son will be entering Kindergarten we'll have two more decisions to make. If we can't make the choices available to us fit our life for both kids, it's very possible that I would homeschool one of them and send the other to an outside school (probably a charter).
    of course, which is why i am not speaking in terms of "good" and "bad", but in terms of aspects intrinsic to each approach by definition. it is a generalization, but necessary to discuss something that, ultimately, "depends", as you are putting it.

    which brings up something else i consider to be good parenting: making the best decision based on the situation instead of taking a general approach regardless of.

    border school, another option to consider...

  9. #79
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    Fair enough except that some of the things you're attributing to homeschool as "intrinsic by definition," aren't.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  10. #80
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INfj
    Posts
    3,741

    Default

    Ehhhh I have a question on a tangent... has anybody gone through the boarding school experience ever liked it or thought it was worthwhile? I have only "stereotypes" to go by here... but I really couldn't see any children fitting well to that.

    Anyways back on topic, but you have to discuss the generalized case here... otherwise this conversation goes nowhere. Because all you can say is homeschooling tends to be associated with these pros and cons... and you're comparing them to the pros and cons for public schooling... something like a sliding scale.

    homeschooling ------- montessori -------- traditional private schooling --------public system

    Actually it's not even a linear system... more like a slide scale for multiple aspects. Some students do better with a more traditional way of learning, other do better with the freer montessori self paced learning. Then you need to throw in safety vs practice dealing with the world "out there". Is it possible to generalize?

Similar Threads

  1. [ENFJ] ENFJ+ESTP as lovers= yes or no?
    By Jonathanthegreat in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 06-23-2010, 03:55 AM
  2. Yes or No?
    By wolfy in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 06-10-2009, 04:44 PM
  3. Preschool, Yes or No?
    By Tigerlily in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 01-07-2009, 12:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO