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View Poll Results: Are you in favor of homeschooling?

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  • Yes

    32 64.00%
  • No

    11 22.00%
  • Unopinionated/other (explain)

    7 14.00%
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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    THIRTY! infants to ONE teacher!?

    Surely you are mistaken. There is no way that one or even two people could care for that many infants in one setting. My best friend is a preschool teacher and I think he had eight in his room.


    Thirty kids is way too many no matter what the age, though. You can't give the individual kids what they need if you're up to your ears in 'em.
    I don't know how to do a link in this so i'll cut and paste the legistation in

    Limit on infant class sizes
    3. - (1) This regulation has effect for limiting class sizes for infant classes at schools in England for the purposes of section 1 of the 1998 Act.

    (2) No infant class at such a school shall contain more than 30 pupils while an ordinary teaching session is conducted by a single qualified teacher.

    (3) Where an ordinary teaching session in the case of any such class is conducted by more than one qualified teacher, paragraph (2) shall be taken to prohibit the class from containing more than 30 pupils for every one of those teachers.


    Its a sad fact that dispite the schools eforts to keep class sizes small the LEA (Local Education Authority) can force the schol to admit 30 pupils to one teacher, and they can do nothing about it.
    The school my 2 go to isn't to bad, they normally have a teaching assistant, and i'd say my daughters class was about 20; but thats in a big room with another class and nursery kids, so dispite having seperate areas it can get very chaotic in there.
    My son who's 6/7 has a class of 26.

  2. #52
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Wow. I think here the law is WAY different. For infants (babies, right? I think up to the age of 2, with regards to this law) the ratio is something like 1:3 or 1:4, it goes up slightly for 2, 3, and 4 year olds, and then school-age kids it's the size of a classroom (1:20? I'm not sure what the limits are here, but my daughter's school caps class size at 14). I know that when I was a childcare provider there was some kind of math about how many children of different ages, including my own, I could care for at one time. And I also know that I never even came close to that limit because it was higher than my own personal limit.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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  3. #53
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    I assume that by infants they mean school childeren that are not compulsery, so .........3 to 5 year olds.
    Child minders have a 1:5 ratio, I think.


    Childminders can be registered to care for up to six children, the number they are registered for includes their own children. Of these children only three can be under the age of five
    Last edited by mooky; 04-02-2008 at 02:03 PM. Reason: Did some looking

  4. #54
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
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    no

  5. #55
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Hmm homeschooling.

    I'm going to take the unpopular opinion and say that it can be really bad in some cases. I realize it's a small sample and I'm not suggesting it would happen for most people, but all 3 of the kids I knew growing up who were homeschooled are now complete social retards who didn't bother with secondary education and are now working crappy jobs as a result. Most homeschooling advocates I've heard only talk about the absolute best-case, perfect parents scenario. If the parents aren't 100% committed, informed, intelligent, and reasonable, it could easily be a disaster.

    I will admit, though, that I'm somewhat biased, having been "homeschooled" for 6 months in middle school, learning absolutely nothing and almost being forced to stay behind a year as a result. I can only imagine where I'd be if my parents had homeschooled me for my entire life (as my mom wanted - my dad wouldn't let her).

    And, I fully agree that when done properly homeschooling can be as good or better than public schools. It's just that, maybe I've been hanging out with radical people, but I've heard from many the attitude that "public school is terrible and you're a better parent if you homeschool"....regardless of how good you are at it. And I just don't agree with that.

  6. #56
    Senior Member Anonymous's Avatar
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    At this time, I'm against it. I know that there can be lots of good homeschooling experiences, sure. Great ones, even. But I have a feeling that there's just as many more poor ones. I was homeschooled in a fundamentalist home up until I was 12, and it was done in a very literal sense of the term. Once I could read, I was basically handed some textbooks every year and went through them at my own pace. It didn't take me long to figure out how to slack off, and I really ended up learning hardly anything. Most of the other families which mine knew (they were all in a rather tight little fundamentalist circle) homeschooled as well, and some of their experiences seemed even worse and more sheltered than mine. I'm not saying that it was crippling, but that's certainly not the kind of basis that a person wants to start a successful life on.

    Now I know, this isn't the case across the board. Ivy presents a perfect example of the other side of homeschooling. But the fact remains that I and an entire circle of children in other families were allowed to go through very sheltered educational process under extreme dogma, and I'm against that. So yes, I'm opposed to the current homeschooling system that is in place. I think there needs to be more regulation for that sort of thing.

  7. #57
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    Hmm homeschooling.

    I'm going to take the unpopular opinion and say that it can be really bad in some cases. I realize it's a small sample and I'm not suggesting it would happen for most people, but all 3 of the kids I knew growing up who were homeschooled are now complete social retards who didn't bother with secondary education and are now working crappy jobs as a result. Most homeschooling advocates I've heard only talk about the absolute best-case, perfect parents scenario. If the parents aren't 100% committed, informed, intelligent, and reasonable, it could easily be a disaster. And what happens in high school, when the child could surpass the parent in knowledge of some areas?

    I will admit, though, that I'm somewhat biased, having been "homeschooled" for 6 months in middle school, learning absolutely nothing and almost being forced to stay behind a year as a result. I can only imagine where I'd be if my parents had homeschooled me for my entire life (as my mom wanted - my dad wouldn't let her).

    And, I fully agree that when done properly homeschooling can be as good or better than public schools. It's just that, maybe I've been hanging out with radical people, but I've heard from many the attitude that "public school is terrible and you're a better parent if you homeschool"....regardless of how good you are at it. And I just don't agree with that.
    I actually agree with you on all points, but let me show you why I still support homeschooling in general:

    Hmm public schooling.

    I'm going to take the unpopular opinion and say that it can be really bad in some cases. I realize it's a small sample and I'm not suggesting it would happen for most people, but a great many of the 3-500 kids I knew growing up who were public schooled are now complete social retards who didn't bother with secondary education and are now working crappy jobs as a result. Most public schooling advocates I've heard only talk about the absolute best-case, perfect schools/teachers scenario. If the teachers aren't 100% committed, informed, intelligent, and reasonable, it could easily be a disaster. And what happens in high school, when the child could surpass the teacher in knowledge of some areas?

    I will admit, though, that I'm somewhat biased, having been "public schooled" for 6 months in middle school, learning absolutely nothing and almost being forced to go to a therapist as a result. I can only imagine where I'd be if my parents had chosen public schools for me for my entire life.

    And, I fully agree that when done properly public schooling can be as good or better than home schools. It's just that, maybe I've been hanging out with radical people, but I've heard from many the attitude that "homeschool is terrible and you're a better parent if you choose public school"....regardless of how good you are at it. And I just don't agree with that.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  8. #58
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
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    i have yet to meet someone who was homeschooled that seemed to gain more (from focused education) than lost. a big part of growing up is not only growing accustomed to the world, but learning how you relate to it... difficult to do that when you're sheltered from your peers.

    there's more to education than reading, writing, math, science... and that's the stuff you won't learn in homeschool.

  9. #59
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grayscale View Post
    i have yet to meet someone who was homeschooled that seemed to gain more (from focused education) than lost. a big part of growing up is not only growing accustomed to the world, but learning how you relate to it... difficult to do that when you're sheltered from your peers.
    This is one of the things that bugs me most in this debate. Homeschooling != being sheltered from your peers. Especially now that so many kids are being homeschooled and networks are forming. Sure, they're not divided into classes with only their exact age cohorts, but IMO that's not necessary for peer socialization.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grayscale
    there's more to education than reading, writing, math, science... and that's the stuff you won't learn in homeschool.
    Really? What are those things? I'd be happy to tell you how my siblings and I learned them in home school.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grayscale View Post
    i have yet to meet someone who was homeschooled that seemed to gain more (from focused education) than lost. a big part of growing up is not only growing accustomed to the world, but learning how you relate to it... difficult to do that when you're sheltered from your peers.

    there's more to education than reading, writing, math, science... and that's the stuff you won't learn in homeschool.
    My wife and I were concerned about that, too. So, once a week we follow our kids into the bathroom, rough them up, threaten them, steal their lunch money, curse at them, and offer them drugs, and that seems to take care of it.

    Honestly, if you think homeschooling means sheltering children from their peers, you haven't seen the larger world of homeschooling. My kids have far more social engagements than I do.

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