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View Poll Results: Are you in favor of homeschooling?

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  • Yes

    32 64.00%
  • No

    11 22.00%
  • Unopinionated/other (explain)

    7 14.00%
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  1. #31
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooky View Post
    I think small classes are a must, they have restricted infant class sizes here to 30 to a teacher.

    But I think 30, 4 an 5 year olds to one teacher is way to high.
    That is pretty high. It could work with older kids if the teacher is excellent, but I don't think there should be more than 20 kids to a teacher until the kids are around 6 or 7.

    Three of my kids go to regular school and two are in elementary. My sons are in second and fourth grade and I think they both have around 18 kids in each of their classes. It's a nice size, IMO.

    The schools here have been really working on the bullying, too. I have had to talk to staff a few times, but it seems as though it isn't as bad as it was when I was a kid. There have actually been kids suspended over my complaints, so they aren't just telling me what I want to hear to make me go away.

    US schools have a pretty bad rap and I was reluctant to enroll my kids in them, but three out of the four have done okay so far. I only have one at home now.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  2. #32
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    When I was in school, I used to wish my mom would homeschool me.

    Socialization? Plenty of better ways to socialize than in school--all that wasted time with half-hearted chit-chat and notes back and forth in class because you're so bored your brain is about to burst. Silly immature games of gossip and who-hates-whom that have no significance outside of the strange subculture of jr. high and high school.

    Learning? I would have learned much more if I could have been left alone to read the books myself. Teachers trying to jerk your thoughts around this way and that, not enough time to let the details sink in and thoroughly explore a real idea because half the class has the attention span of an excited gnat (to steal Lee's metaphor). Long after I graduated, when I learned that ISS was really just the opportunity to sit alone and read and write all day (what heaven!), I became rather bitter about the fact that the "bad" students got the good school and the "good" students had to keep going to the crap classes full of distracting other students who won't shut up.

    I'd considered that maybe all those ideas were the product of my angsty teenage brain and perhaps public school is much better than I'd imagined. After teaching 10th and 11th grade English for 8 months, I'm convinced I was right after all. It's very very difficult to teach a prescribed curriculum to a room full of 30 different abilities, interests, and motivations. I don't see how it can possibly be ideal either for the more advanced students or for the ones who fall behind.

    Unless my children (if I have any) turn out to be very opposed to the idea, I think they'd benefit more from homeschooling than from being run through the public school system.

  3. #33
    Senior Member aeon's Avatar
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    I support homeschooling, and the form I support most is unschooling.

    I was not homeschooled, save to the degree I schooled myself, unschooling style, when I got home from public school.


    cheers,
    Ian

  4. #34
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    You know yr all making want to home school again,

  5. #35
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aeon View Post
    I support homeschooling, and the form I support most is unschooling.

    I was not homeschooled, save to the degree I schooled myself, unschooling style, when I got home from public school.


    cheers,
    Ian
    This is how my mother homeschooled us. It was excellent for me because I got to choose the direction I took-- and I wanted to take a direction. It wasn't as good for my younger brother because he wasn't very self-directed. She did have to nudge him a bit more to actually learn stuff instead of playing video games all day.
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  6. #36
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I always wanted to be homeschooled, but my mom always said no. I remember begging her all the time, this was of course after she said that it's the law that I have to be in school. I think I was about 8 when I started suggesting that I be homeschooled, yet I never was. My mom used the excuse of she didn't have time/she'd do a bad job, I don't know if home schooling would have been right for me socially but then again I was trying to leave school because of the social aspects of it. Until fourth grade none of my friends were in the same school as me I knew them from church and an afterschool program. So I was like I either want to go to the public school down the street from my house (where my friends went) or be home schooled but my parent's were advised by my kindergarten teachers that I would drown in a big class so that's why I didn't go to public for first-eighth like my brother.
    I could have been homeschooled then gone still gone to the afterschool program as it was private and you paid for it out of your pocket and would take anyone of age and willing to pay. I guess homeschool is good for some and not so for others.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  7. #37
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    I home schooled up until 5th grade and then again my Sophomore year in H.S.

    I think in either schooling environment, you're gonna learn the essentials (reading, writing, math etc.) however I feel adapting in a social environment and growing socially in those formative years is almost more important than your HS education all together. So, as long as your getting the essentials I'd say going to school is more beneficial for the well-being of an individual (generally speaking). If you are home schooled but involved in other activities away from home (church, sports, clubs) then I don't think it would be an issue though. I have known a few home schoolers that were very socially awkward and almost handicapped. Just depends though, everyone's different. What works for some doesn't for others.

    This has been a post, brought to you by Gloria Estefan.

  8. #38
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    Ivy: You were homeschooled?

    Was anyone else here homeschooled?


    I think faith's commentary on it is rather telling, especially considering her career choice...
    I 100%, N 88%, T 88%, J 75%

    Disclaimer: The above is my opinion and mine alone, it does not mean I cannot change my mind, nor does it guarantee that my comments are related to any deep-seated convictions. Take everything I say with a whole snowplow worth of salt and call me in the morning, if you can.

  9. #39
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Yep, I was. Not for the whole time, though. I went to public school from K-5. I started out at a public middle school for 6th grade but quickly became depressed and stopped working because it was big and corporate and I didn't have a connection to anyone. So my mom took me out and homeschooled me until Christmas. The second half of the year I went to a Quaker private school where I stayed through 9th grade. Then I was homeschooled for the rest of high school. I mostly audited classes at a local university though, didn't do much at home. And "the rest of high school" turned out to be only one more year, since I got a GED on my 16th birthday and started taking college classes for credit then.
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  10. #40
    Senior Member celesul's Avatar
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    I've never thought that much about home schooling, but I can see how it would be good, especially for students who don't fit in with the norm as much.

    I actually go to private school, which is good for a number of reasons. One being that I'm not all that socially adept and the local school is known for being rather bratty and vicious, while a smaller school at least allows the teachers to monitor people more closely. Actually, despite my classmates being ridiculously rich, and I do mean ridiculously, they are very nice about it, and don't care if their friends have money. I'd get along better with them if I shared common interests, such as popular music and movies, but they are all nice enough to me.

    Another problem is that I've a few learning problems, although none are severe, and while the school isn't intended for LD (rather, it's intended for high achievers) the small size helps enormously. Sure, it's still hard to sit still with adhd, but at least the teacher is attentive and realizes that I'm not trying to be annoying, so they focus less on punishment and more on how to improve. So I don't have any problems in school right now, more the opposite, but I think it has a lot to do with the school. My smallest two classes this year have 8 kids, the largest two have 20, and one is somewhere in-between. I think the typical class size at my school is 13-15 kids. The thought of having a larger class astonishes me. I have some trouble with 20 kids, although not with a good teacher, but even a good teacher couldn't make a class of 30 kids work. For me, 20 is a large class.
    "'You scoundrel, you have wronged me,' hissed the philosopher. 'May you live forever!'" - Ambrose Bierce

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