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View Poll Results: Are you in favor of homeschooling?

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  • Yes

    32 64.00%
  • No

    11 22.00%
  • Unopinionated/other (explain)

    7 14.00%
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  1. #11
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I support homeschooling.

    I think parents should have as many options available for educating their children as possible. I do not believe in a one-size-fits-all education system.

    I went to public schools and a private religious school. I do not wish I had been homeschooled because my mom would not have kept me on task and I was not a self-motivated child. I did okay in the schools I went to.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
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  2. #12
    Resident Snot-Nose GZA's Avatar
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    I'm not homeschooled, but I support it. I know several homeschooled kids and I think its a good program. I think I might have benefitted from homeschooling or some kind of specialized education plan, but regular school is fine, too, although way too structured in some major ways at times.

    The problem with regular schools is they don't really adapt too much to different kids. I'm not blaming the teachers -they are great, it would be impossible to adapt to everyone. Some teachers end up clicking with some students learning styles very well, but some students don't get the same experience. Its great when you have a teacher you teaches in just the way you get it, but it really sucks when the class requires certain things that arn't necesarily the best way to teach the class but are the easiest way to run a large classroom. I find that english class especially suffers... everyone has to read the same book (or chose from a list of four or five) and the kids who can read better or worse are kind of left behind, not to mention its unlikely most people will enjoy the book, which I think is important to learning to read and analysing literature. Essays have the same problem; only a couple of choices on what to write about and theres no garuntee you'll really have anything to say or any interest in it, so it might not end up representing your true ability.

  3. #13
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I support it, but I don't think it's always the best choice.

    I was homeschooled for part of my education (part of 6th grade, all of high school) and I'm very grateful for it.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member nemo's Avatar
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    I think kids need to go to public school for at least a little while to get socialized and introduced to the world outside of their home.

    Also, kids should be playing in the mud and collecting bugs all day until they're, oh, 18 or so, and then they can be expected to sit still in a classroom.

    I was an absolute terror in elementary/middle school, haha.

    But in general, yeah public schools can suck and not allow for individuality and so on, but neither does the "real world," so get used to it.

    I'm sort of ambivalent with homeschooling.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member millerm277's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merkw View Post
    Do you support homeschooling?
    I think that it's good for the parents and kids (gifted and not) who are willing to put the time and effort into it, but the ones that don't, are what make my opinion mixed.

    If you attended a standard school, have you ever wished that you were home-schooled? Why so?
    I've always gone to public school, but from an academic standpoint, I do wish I was homeschooled. I learn much more quickly than my peers tend to, and as a result, I've always been bored in school. It might have been nice to be able to learn at my pace instead of always having to wait for the slowest kid in the class.
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  6. #16
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    I'm actually glad I wasn't homeschooled. I probably would have loved it academically, and I'd have loved to have a curriculum tailored to my interests. But I'm shy enough as it is, and I think I'd have had a horrible shock going into college if I hadn't had years of public school to prepare me socially. You can try to socialize your kids if you homeschool them, but it won't be the same as having to experience the normal fun/horrors of the child/teen social scene.

  7. #17
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    I was homeschooled and I'm glad I was. Of course, I have had some issues (primarily dealing with relationships, or rather the lack thereof), but I can't say that everything would have turned out for the better had not been homeschooled. I honestly will never know whether it was for the better, but I still support homeschooling.

    The way that anyone turns out in any system inevitably depends on the person, but as far as homeschooling goes, how you do it really makes a difference as well. The beauty of homeschooling to me is the fact that you really have a lot of freedom, but that can also be really daunting or it can be abused. I'm not a homeschooling parent (yet), but I think that the most important things to consider when homeschooling are these:

    1. You really need to be involved in each child's learning. I speak this as one of six children, each of which were/are homeschooled. It seems to me that many homeschoolers, often because of busyness, rely on packaged curriculum to teach a subject without paying much attention, and thus often subjects will fall by the wayside, particularly if a child really dislikes the subject. Having that direct involvement is often, in my opinion, one of the most crucial factors for making homeschooling effective.

    2. Every child learns differently. Putting the time in to be involved in a child's education also involves understanding how your children learn and gearing things so they learn the best. Part of this is recognizing that something that worked with one child may or may not work with the rest.

    For example, I was the oldest child, and I absolutely loved math. Algebra was amazing to me. I was able to cruise through the curriculum we had with virtually no assistance. When my sisters started algebra, my mother gave them the same curriculum and didn't pay a whole lot of attention. I don't know whether she was aware of this or whether she was just used to not having to worry about it, but they struggled a lot with it, and still do.

    Different approaches just work for different kids, and I think that if the right approach is used, any child can learn well. Public school works for some people, but I don't think it works for everybody. Still, just being schooled at home isn't an instant recipe for academic success. Homeschooling gives you flexibility, but you have to use it right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    I'm actually glad I wasn't homeschooled. I probably would have loved it academically, and I'd have loved to have a curriculum tailored to my interests. But I'm shy enough as it is, and I think I'd have had a horrible shock going into college if I hadn't had years of public school to prepare me socially. You can try to socialize your kids if you homeschool them, but it won't be the same as having to experience the normal fun/horrors of the child/teen social scene.
    I don't think homeschooling deserves all of the bad reputation as far as social aspects go. It really depends on how you do it. If you isolate your children, then sure, they'll probably have social problems. That doesn't mean that they need to go to school in order to learn how to socialize healthily though. It's really up to you how your children socialize when you homeschool.

    Personally, I don't think that the public school environment is very healthy for kids. Sure, you can say that they need to learn how to deal with realities of life, but I honestly don't see how school is the best place to learn that.

    Yawn... I going to have to go to bed now and proofread this in the morning. I don't know whether anything I said made any sense..

  8. #18
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    I would like to home school my 4 children, as I really don’t believe schools do a good enough job these days, with class sizes so big etc.
    When I was at high school I struggled with algebra and my maths teacher was always in the class next door flirting with the teacher there. So I asked my dad, they went out and got me some paper and pens just for that and I sat every evening with my dad working through it, now algebra is my strongest maths subject............just because someone took the time to sit with me one on one and explain it till I got it.
    My partner doesn’t think I’d have the time to home school our 4 though, because of the babies. I'm not so sure, as I know that just an hour with me will put our son at the top of his class in a given subject.

    But I struggle with the HOW would I do it, I’m not very good with maths and spelling (im dyslexic). How do you organise yr day? Do you work from books? It’s all a mystery to me, not knowing anyone who home schools. I do think with some support I would happily do it though.

  9. #19
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    I was homeschooled K-7 and I'm somewhat in favor of it so long as religious homeschooling is not allowed.

  10. #20
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooky View Post
    I would like to home school my 4 children, as I really don’t believe schools do a good enough job these days, with class sizes so big etc.
    When I was at high school I struggled with algebra and my maths teacher was always in the class next door flirting with the teacher there. So I asked my dad, they went out and got me some paper and pens just for that and I sat every evening with my dad working through it, now algebra is my strongest maths subject............just because someone took the time to sit with me one on one and explain it till I got it.
    My partner doesn’t think I’d have the time to home school our 4 though, because of the babies. I'm not so sure, as I know that just an hour with me will put our son at the top of his class in a given subject.

    But I struggle with the HOW would I do it, I’m not very good with maths and spelling (im dyslexic). How do you organise yr day? Do you work from books? It’s all a mystery to me, not knowing anyone who home schools. I do think with some support I would happily do it though.
    I hear ya mooky. Have you looked into K12? They offer international classes as well for over the pond peeps such as yourself.

    I will be starting this soon with our 6 year old son. I am waiting to hear back from his 1st grade teacher as to whether or not she will give us his books to finish off this year since I am taking him out early.

    Mooky we are on a year round schedule since my 8 year old is still attending school and that is their schedule. I also happen to love it. They go to school for 9 weeks and then have three off instead of attending for 9-10 months and having the whole summer off.

    Edit: Sas we're not homeschooling for religious reasons. I think more and more non religious folks are homeschooling because the education system just ain't working. Maybe we need to consider paying teachers more!
    Time is a delicate mistress.

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