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  1. #11
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    Also, one point I forgot to add, I have seen people spend thousands of dollars on vet bill. Trying to cure their 18 year old dog of cancer and crap (which I would never do). I wonder if they are just pretending wanting to be a pet owner as well...
    Well, pets don't talk back.
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

    My Nohari
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  2. #12
    ThatGirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortnsweet View Post
    Well, pets don't talk back.
    Ha! Well, neither does TK.....

  3. #13
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erm View Post
    I don't think anyone can deny that parenting is rather essential to the progression of humanity, and can be justified in many, many ways. It's just one of many studies trying to find what goes on mentally around it. Granted, this one is a bit pointless, but still...

    ...FOR SCIENCE!
    More like scienz!

    Frankly, though, some of the stuff that gets studied nowadays, I'm like, wasn't there something else more valuable to actually study? It merely reminded me of the arguments about whether altruism exists or not (since maybe it's really just a form of selfishness).

    Sometimes when you try to quantify an experience in order to study it, you strip it of the very intangibles driving the behavior and thus arrive at a wrong or misdirected answer.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #14
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortnsweet View Post
    Ha! I've always been suspicious of overly joyful parents. Very suspicious, especially since I don't understand their extreme joyfulness about such a big committment. Kids are fun and all, but I noticed a lot of my friends who are parents start using this vocabulary that they never used before once they have a child. "Oh the joy of having my darling, beautiful children!" (As the kid spits up all over itself.) It's almost fake. It sounds sarcastic. And then I try to remove those thoughts from my head and tell myself that I'm sure parenting must be joyful... I just don't understand it yet because I'm not a parent.
    Well, I do think that it depends on one's personality. (Honestly, if *I* ever said something like that in that fashion, you can be rest assured it would be sarcasm.) I just don't want to write off a potentially authentic (even if tacky) response that some parents might experience over their kids.

    I will definitely say that I reached a point in my life that, when I see my kids do something profound (they're all teens now, or close to it) or show another step toward their actualization as individuals, I can be brought to immediate tears over it. I never expected that at all. And I feel this huge outpouring of emotion regarding them... almost wonder that I could have brought them into this world and contributed to their shaping as people, but whatever they're doing now is far beyond anything I taught them.

    It's like trying to teach your child how to fly, and all the basics of flying... and then one day watching them unexpectedly leap out into the air, catch the currents, and soar far higher than you might have ever thought possible. Something I imagined and possible and beautiful but couldn't quite experience or catch the details of is manifesting far beyond what I imagined, right in front of me.

    (I also understand now why parents could immediately sacrifice their lives for their kids, without a second thought.)

    I dunno. It's not really a choice, it's just something that exists because it does, although it was based on the fact I did choose to invest... and so then I became attached.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #15
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    What are the economic benefits to reading, being a movie buff, taking care of your front lawn if you're not trying to sell it, listening to music, pretty much any hobby where you spend money for no economic return?

    If people don't want children, don't have kids.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    People are rationalising rather than rational beings so I think they'll carry on being directed by powerful affects, emotions with ideas attached, when making decisions and inventing reasons afterwards.

    Economics knows this too, while there are the proponents of logic and rational calculation theories (and they sell popular books in the airports so the ideas have gotten a head start) economics has also given the world "irrational exubberance" and "animal spirits" to explain behaviour in the economy. Its as applicable elsewhere besides financial transactions.

  7. #17
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    All of my girlfriends who have kids tell me never to have children.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  8. #18
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenaphor View Post
    What are the economic benefits to reading, being a movie buff, taking care of your front lawn if you're not trying to sell it, listening to music, pretty much any hobby where you spend money for no economic return?

    If people don't want children, don't have kids.
    You suggesting that economic ideas or theories arent applicable beyond assets, jobs and money?

    I used to think like that and I do understand why people reject the idea of a "one big theory of everything" but economics was originally a species of moral philosophy (Smith) and later had a close relationship to sociology (Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel) and I do think that people in most instances try to maximise benefits and minimise expenses or costs, that's pretty simplistic but it is one example.

    Decisions about having children reflect a basic cost-benefit analysis to me, I think that's why there's so many deadbeats or child deserters in the world, people dont see them as blessings, they're liabilities and chores for the most part unfortunately.

  9. #19
    morose bourgeoisie
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    Economics explains parent/child relationships about as well as chemistry explains music.

  10. #20

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    People forget that kids can do useful stuff like wash the car and dishes. "This isn't a hotel you know"

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