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  1. #1

    Default Autism and brain types.

    This was an interesting article on several levels. The author refers to Simon Baron-Cohen's work on autism and his three brain theory.

    He believes there are 3 kinds of brains E (empathising), S (systemising) and B (Balanced). Cohen's runs the Autism Research Center at Cambridge and claims parents of autistic/aspergers children tend to have BOTH parents with strong S brains. Does anyone here have aspergers or know someone well enough that they know there parents well? or worked with kids who have it etc?

    A Marriage of Unequals - Judith Warner - Domestic Disturbances - Opinion - New York Times Blog

  2. #2
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I will read the article, but I am the parent of two autistic children and I would almost lay money on being considered the possessor of an empathizing or balanced brain. I'll comment on the article after I read it.

    Edit: The article fits us and does not fit us, if that makes sense. I'm a reasonably strong Feeler, so I do not think we have the S/S thing going on as the article theorizes. Both being INs, however, my husband and I are more alike than unlike. We both have sensory issues and I do test fairly high on non-mathematical logic. It would not surprise me if my husband is an undiagnosed aspie, so with his quirks and me not only not overriding them, but adding my own, well, it's no huge surprise that of our four children, two of them (our sons) are on the spectrum. Our daughters have quirks of their own, but are considered neuro-typical. So whatever that means . . .
    Last edited by cafe; 03-20-2008 at 09:32 PM. Reason: adding comments
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  3. #3

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    I was confused about what is considered systemising in the context of parents. I would imagine your husband (if I recall is an INTP). I would assume most INFJs are balanced, while INTPs tend to be systemising. But a balanced person could still out systemise a person who is a pure systemiser.

    I think if the parents do well on analytical linear problem solving tests (like the IQ or SAT), I think balanced people would also count as systemisers according to Cohen's definitions, but not completely sure. I made my gf read this article and told her "WE CAN NEVER HAVE KIDS" (as a joke), she didn't find it funny.

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    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Yes, my husband is an INTP and I agree that that probably would be considered a Systemising (sp?) brain type. I think I remember taking those quizzes, but I can't remember how I scored and the link in the article didn't like me just now. On the Right/Left brain tests I come out balanced. On standardized/IQ tests, I suck at visual/spatial and math and tend to score above average on other portions with the highest scores in verbal. My husband scores better on everything than I do except I sometimes barely edge him out on verbal sections. I don't know if any of that is relevant.

    Edit: As far as having kids goes, you at least are extroverted, so that may be something to balance things out (though one of our sons is extroverted, too). It is a little scary and that is one of the many reasons I do not want to have more children. But our sons are 9 and 11 and at this point, the autism isn't a huge deal. I mean, their thought processes aren't always consistent with what works irl and the sensory stuff can be a pain, but at least they are logical.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    I'm not sure about this idea. It could be true... but I don't think it should be used as a reason to change patterns in our society. If two people who are systemizers want to marry, I don't think anything should be done to prevent that.

    But I've been reading a few other ideas about this, suggesting that we only find so many people on the autistic spectrum these days because we now have a term for something that was once dismissed as an eccentricity rather than diagnosed. In other words, I think our definition of healthy, normal behavior has become more narrow, thus we see more "deviants."

    Does that make sense?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    I'm not sure about this idea. It could be true... but I don't think it should be used as a reason to change patterns in our society. If two people who are systemizers want to marry, I don't think anything should be done to prevent that.
    I really was kidding about not having kids. It would never stop me from reproducing because I thought my mate was too good at math (even if the theory turned out to be true). Even if it was the case, the odds are still pretty low of it happening.

    Besides, I wouldn't mind having a little aspie kid at all, I would have endless experiments to run on him/her.

    *That sounded horrible re: experiments, meant to say I would still have kids even if I knew they would be autistic.
    Last edited by meanlittlechimp; 03-21-2008 at 01:32 PM.

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    Senior Member Veneti's Avatar
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    Here's an INTJ perspective on high functioning Autism and its often connection to INTJs

    INTJ Personality Type - Asperger & High Functioning Autism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veneti View Post
    Here's an INTJ perspective on high functioning Autism and its often connection to INTJs

    INTJ Personality Type - Asperger & High Functioning Autism.
    Awesome find.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I dunno. My older son is very probably an extrovert. Maybe even an ESTJ. He's loud, outgoing, loves attention. He does some really odd behaviors sometimes in order to get attention. He's intelligent and logical, but not intellectual.

    My younger son could be an INTJ, but he is probably an INTP or ISTP.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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