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  1. #31
    Tier 1 Member LunaLuminosity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    Anyone else feel this way when posting? Like you're constantly being criticized for not quoting long chunks of texts or reiterating stuff you learned from a book? That you get bored after 2 posts in a debate so you leave, especially when you realize the person you're debating with is stubborn and will just twist your words? That you don't write novels for posts? that what you're curious about, others see as dumb/retarded/useless.

    I'm sorry I will never be an intellectual, it's just not who I am. I still love to learn.
    I know you said you were sarcastic about this, but I should still make clear that the two bolded phrases are totally contradictory. Being an intellectual has nothing to do with being smart. It's way more interesting if you don't know tons of information and approaches already because there is more to learn.

    Writing novels for posts is overrated. I immensely appreciate it when someone writes posts that are readable and concise. It's an awesome skill to have.

    I still get what you mean though, about feeling inept compared to these supersmart typoCers because I have little capacity to read through the novel-length posts and I don't have enough information contained in my head to write a novel-length post if I wanted to. But some of the long posts that I try to read end up being like the same stuff that someone else summed up in like two sentences (so perhaps I'm not missing a whole lot), and I'm sure if I dedicate more of my time to reading stuff then the information will stick long enough in my head eventually.

  2. #32
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I wasn't implying that intellectualism had to do with being smart. Yes I like to learn, but I get bored with topics so easily and quickly that I'll never reach the level of intellectualism.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  3. #33
    Reptilian Snuggletron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    don't be an ass.
    what are you whining about now? I'm actually agreeing with you.

  4. #34
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snuggletron View Post
    what are you whining about now? I'm actually agreeing with you.
    oh sorry I thought you were saying I wrote a wall of text, and that you didn't read it. my bad. and I was like why are you replying if you didn't read?!
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  5. #35
    Glycerine
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    Same, I just write what I want to write because in the end, this forum doesn't require high caliber posts.... it's for fun.

  6. #36
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Eh, I can deal with walls of text, though if they are repetitive (which they can be, but not always) it does get annoying. I'm pretty sure I've gone overboard sometimes in responses myself. Part of it is that I know what the potential responses will be, so I try to tackle all of them in one post before the other person has the opportunity to waste my time. Often that takes a small wall of text, but I like to be able to guide things my way. To try and cover all bases.

    Concision is a virtue, but certain topics often demand greater amounts of content per post.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  7. #37
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    Eh, I can deal with walls of text, though if they are repetitive (which they can be, but not always) it does get annoying. I'm pretty sure I've gone overboard sometimes in responses myself. Part of it is that I know what the potential responses will be, so I try to tackle all of them in one post before the other person has the opportunity to waste my time. Often that takes a small wall of text, but I like to be able to guide things my way. To try and cover all bases.

    Concision is a virtue, but certain topics often demand greater amounts of content per post.
    I wouldn't spend too much time with lengthy arguments unless I had some investment in getting an understanding with a person. There's a relationship factor there, I guess. I give others benefit of the doubt, and might try to bring up talking points, but those may get passed on. I don't care to talk further and expand if I'm going to be ignored on the shorter statement. Maybe this lack of verbosity gives me the air of "not being a genius" or something, but I don't mind (I'm not a genius anyways). I will say though that I'm more intelligent than anyone who can't even engage others by default. For example, Solitary Walker is notorious for "walls o' text", but he's intentionally pushing people away. His posts are intentionally composed with a lot of obscure, hoighty-toighty words that signify a lot of aggression towards his readers (or should I say passive-aggression). He might be a bright guy with a lot to say, but he's uncool for no reason sometimes. Therefore, not a genius. :P

  8. #38
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Wall-O-Text is a Wall-O-Text

    I rather you give a link and summarize the link, or use the link as back up to your stance.

    Copy->Pasting a long line of text isn't something to be proud of.

  9. #39
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    I think you need to look deeper at what is going on. Start by examining the neosemantic paradigm of discourse, where one is faced with a choice: either accept textual libertarianism or conclude that reality is created by communication, but only if truth is interchangeable with reality. However, la Tournier suggests that we have to choose between postcapitalist construction and constructive prestructuralist theory. Marx uses the term ‘textual libertarianism’ to denote a mythopoetical reality.

    Thus, if conceptual discourse holds, we have to choose between constructivist sublimation and subconstructivist narrative. Any number of dematerialisms concerning structural postconceptualist theory exist.

    It could be said that constructivist sublimation implies that the collective is intrinsically meaningless. Bataille uses the term ‘textual narrative’ to denote not construction, but neoconstruction.

    In the works of Joyce, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. In a sense, Dietrich suggests that the works of Joyce are empowering. If subcultural discourse holds, we have to choose between textual libertarianism and capitalist libertarianism.

    But the characteristic theme of Wilson’s essay on structural postconceptualist theory is the role of the artist as participant. The subject is interpolated into a constructivist sublimation that includes art as a paradox.

    It could be said that the premise of structural postconceptualist theory implies that culture is capable of significant form. Sartre uses the term ‘the prestructural paradigm of expression’ to denote a semanticist totality.

    However, structural postconceptualist theory states that academe is impossible, but only if Foucault’s model of subdialectic socialism is valid; if that is not the case, Marx’s model of textual libertarianism is one of “structuralist theory”, and thus part of the genre of truth. Bataille uses the term ‘presemiotic nihilism’ to denote the defining characteristic, and some would say the rubicon, of textual society.

    “Sexual identity is elitist,” says Sartre. Therefore, the premise of structural postconceptualist theory implies that narrativity serves to entrench class divisions. The subject is contextualised into a textual libertarianism that includes truth as a whole.

    It could be said that Hanfkopf states that we have to choose between the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and capitalist discourse. An abundance of theories concerning the common ground between class and culture may be found.

    In a sense, if structural postconceptualist theory holds, we have to choose between constructivist sublimation and neodialectic nationalism. The fatal flaw, and subsequent economy, of structural postconceptualist theory prevalent in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man emerges again in Finnegan’s Wake.

    “Class is fundamentally a legal fiction,” says Lacan; however, according to la Fournier, it is not so much class that is fundamentally a legal fiction, but rather the failure, and therefore the paradigm, of class. Therefore, the main theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the observer as participant. Many discourses concerning textual libertarianism exist.

    If one examines capitalist postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject structural postconceptualist theory or conclude that language is impossible. But the subject is interpolated into a Lyotardist narrative that includes reality as a reality. In Dubliners, Joyce denies constructivist sublimation; in Finnegan’s Wake, however, he reiterates deconstructive narrative.

    In a sense, the subject is contextualised into a textual libertarianism that includes language as a totality. The feminine/masculine distinction intrinsic to Joyce’s Ulysses is also evident in Dubliners, although in a more self-supporting sense.

    But the subject is interpolated into a structural postconceptualist theory that includes narrativity as a whole. Any number of theories concerning a neocultural reality may be revealed.

    In a sense, in Finnegan’s Wake, Joyce examines constructivist sublimation; in A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man he affirms textual libertarianism. Sartre’s analysis of structural postconceptualist theory holds that the goal of the artist is deconstruction.

    Therefore, the characteristic theme of McElwaine’s critique of textual libertarianism is the role of the participant as writer. Foucault uses the term ‘constructivist sublimation’ to denote a mythopoetical whole.

  10. #40
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erm View Post
    I think you need to look deeper at what is going on. If one examines the neosemantic paradigm of discourse......
    What about the discourse community of TypoC?

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