User Tag List

View Poll Results: Which option best applies to you?

Voters
58. You may not vote on this poll
  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 77

  1. #1
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534

    Default Asperger Syndrome, Autism, and MBTIc: a questionnaire

    Indeed, the autistic spectrum has been discussed here before, but I have grown curious of personal experiences or opinions.

    Some questions I have:

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.

    I have entered my myself into the poll as well, under the option that best applies to me. At a later point in time, I will give my own personal answers to the questionnaire.

    Thanks for participating.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  2. #2
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    11,925

    Default

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? Yes, I am officially diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, possibly also OCD. If so, please list your MBTI type. No.
    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum? I am officially diagnosed.
    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? I'm pretty much an social outcast and have been all my life. How would you describe your condition? I am shy, I enjoy conceiving internal fantasy worlds in my head but I have no way of knowing how to bring them to fruition. How is your life affected by it, if at all? I require predictability, I don't like changes in my environment, and if sudden changes happen, I become uneasy and even volatile. How do you perceive non-autists? Ignorant bastards who don't understand people.
    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? No one that I'm aware of (at least not officially). How severe is it? N/A If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person? The one person I possibly suspect is likely an INTJ, actually.
    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it? I'm not sure.
    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Genetic, most likely. Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? I tend to think it's mostly a personality difference that society finds undesirable. Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement? The only cure I think should be made is a change in other people's perceptions of autistic people. But I refuse to accept other people unless they accept me...and for some reason, I don't really want people to accept me, because then I'll have an excuse to continue my bitterness towards humanity.
    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? I misinterpret people's language because I am not all that familiar with hip similes; I also have obsessive knowledge about my fields of interest; I need to follow a structured routine and changes must be announced ahead of time; I have very poor social skills. A sad/tragic situation? I wonder what the point is, people must have seen it coming. And if it didn't happen to me, I don't see why I should care. A particular situation where it has been a burden? Every time I go out in public and seeing people find it easier to function in the ways I find difficult. A blessing? I'm pretty much smarter than everyone else.
    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent? N/A
    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum? Some of my uncles on my father's side -- none of them are really that social.
    10. Please mark the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread. Okay.

    Thanks for participating.

  3. #3

    Default

    What if someone else (a mental health professional) suspected me to be on the autistic spectrum but didn't dignose me, and I have a relative who has autism, but I don't suspect that I am on the autistic spectrum anymore?

    That is even though I don't suspect it, it may still be possible that I am on the spectrum.

    I didn't see that option.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  4. #4
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    What if someone else (a mental health professional) suspected me to be on the autistic spectrum but didn't dignose me, and I have a relative who has autistism, but I don't suspect that I am on the autistic spectrum anymore?

    That is even though I don't suspect it, it may still be possible that I am on the spectrum.

    I didn't see that option.
    Ah, sorry about that.
    In any case, still put that under option #2.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  5. #5
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    11,925

    Default

    So far, I am the only one officially diagnosed? Weird...

  6. #6
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    1,465

    Default

    Wildcat is an aspie. You'll have to get him here to do the quiz though.

    I have an inkling that most people affected with autism spectrum disorders would be INTPs.

    apologies. short attention span. quiz as follows:

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?


    No to both.


    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?


    One personally. Severe enough for others to be afraid. INTPs are likely to be on the spectrum. Especially for social anxiety and inability to understand predator/prey relationships.

    Quite a few children. The special schools.


    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?


    Tabula rasa. They are blank slates. In that sense they are pure souls. And they see the world in infinitely more colour than normal people. That's the good. The bad is that few understand them, or try to. Those who are different are always knocked down. And so, they suffer a lot because of it.


    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?


    Genetics, a mis-wiring, mis-firing of the brain. If you can call it that. Perhaps they're just standard deviations off the curve of normal.


    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?


    They get judged very often, and are ignored or treated as invisible, or with fear, by people. It;s the minor incidents: people are usually too polite, but a remark passed behind the back, a subtle shift away, an extra glance, a huddling and whispers.
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  7. #7
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    11,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    Wildcat is an aspie. You'll have to get him here to do the quiz though.

    I have an inkling that most people affected with autism spectrum disorders would be INTPs.
    I'm thinking any introverted NT types, with the introverted ST types following, probably more likely for the ISTJ.

    I'm think the INTJ would be more likely because, as a J, he needs structure and routine and does not like surprises, one of the hallmarks of autistic spectrum disorders.

    And Aspies are likely to be noted for idiosyncrasies which would push them closer to an N type, specifically NT.

    I'm also guessing that the NTPs (particularly ENTP) will more likely be ADD (mental hyperactivity), while the ESTP would be more likely ADHD (physical hyperactivity).

    Also, OCD, I feel, is in the realm of INTJs, because an OCD patient has to do with performing rituals to filter out unwanted thoughts. They also tend to be conceptual people in general. Keirsey also correlated this trait to the Rational temperament, along with a large proportion of autistic traits.

    However, the OCPD patient would more likely be ISTJs. OCPD is what most people associate with OCD, but while the behavior may be the same, the motivations are different. An OCPD patient is the type who is anal about minor rules and details.

  8. #8
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    5,349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merkw View Post
    ...
    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    He is the son of a friend in another state. He was diagnosed with strong autism when he was about 5, I think. He's in his 20's now. He was extremely introverted. I don't know him well enough to answer for sure anything else, but he did become a wiz at computers and playing a musical instrument. His family was full of "quirky redheads" who are highly specialized at something - parents, aunts, uncles, cousins. Speaking of which, I know another family with some quirky redheads (don't know whether that's significant or not) who has a son who is so... well.. I wouldn't be surprised if he was diagnosed with a mild form of autism.

    Autistic tendencies seem rather INTJ or ISTJ ish to me.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    My first introduction was from seeing Rain Man many years ago. My impression is that they become very stuck in their ways and need everything to be the same all the time. They don't adjust well to any changes. They can dig in their heels and become very stubborn if they're forced to endure too much out-of-the-ordinary happenings. I have a friend who takes care of a man with Down Syndrome. He has this type of "stubbornness against change" also. Not sure if he is also autistic.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    I don't know anything about this. I thought it was a genetic malfunction like what causes other mental or physical handicaps.

    Neurodiversity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    "The concept of neurodiversity is embraced by some autistic individuals and people with related conditions, who believe that autism is not a disorder, but a part of their identity, so that curing autistic people would be the same as destroying their original personalities. Proponents prefer the term over such labels as "abnormal" and "disabled". Some groups apply the concept of neurodiversity to ADHD,[2] developmental speech disorders as well as dyslexic, dyspraxic, hyperactive people, and Parkinson's.[2]"

    I find that frustrating. Nothing is a disorder any more. If I had a child with autism, I would want him to be able to lead as "normal" of a life as possible. I think that extreme autism makes "normal" life extremely difficult. If you say it's not a disorder, all of a sudden there's no money available to help you, because well, there's nothing wrong with you. You're "normal".

    I had a friend who had a son who talked like "Baby Bay-oh" (Baby Bear) on Sesame Street, but she couldn't get therapy for him because it was decided that was a "normal speech pattern". Never mind that we couldn't understand him half the time. What a bunch of rubbish.

    I'm sure there's other sides to this I'm not seeing, but those are my first impressions.

    Being a person who is also uncomfortable with too much change, I see it as a social handicap I have. It does not help me in real life.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    My friend's client, the man with Downs who is possibly also autistic - there were a couple of incidents where she had to physically overpower him just to get him to sit in the back seat instead of the front seat that he was used to. She wanted me to have the front seat. She was extremely embarrassed (ISFJ) and I would gladly have taken the back seat, but she didn't want me to.

    Another time, she took him to a new home for a Christmas party and he embarrassed her and made everyone in the house uncomfortable by physically resisting her as she tried to lead him through the house while he yelled "No!' "No!"

  9. #9
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    11,925

    Default

    I'm going to assume that an ISTJ autistic would less likely be diagnosed, because as an SJ, the ISTJ is more cooperative to the norms of society. Same goes for an INFJ autistic, who is likely to be the kind of autistic that has trouble fitting in with a group.

    The INTJ, on the other hand, as a highly utilitarian type, is more likely to be diagnosed for being a disruption to the school environment, which is when most kids become diagnosed with their respective "disabilities." And unlike the INFJ autistic, the INTJ would less likely be interested in fitting into a group.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally?
    2-3
    How severe is it?
    mild
    If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    INTP, INTP, EXTX
    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    To me, autism appears to be a difference of perception, predominantly in areas sensory experiences and communication/social interaction.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism?
    I believe there is a strong genetic component. Beyond that I'm unsure.

    Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure?
    Disorder as defined by something that doesn't work normally, I suppose could be accurate. Probably the severity would be more of a determining factor. A difference in brain structure seems like it would be fairly easily observed and really doesn't prove or rule out a disorder. In milder cases, I would consider it a normal neurological variation.

    Do you think there should be a cure? Theoretically, yes, but those affected or their guardians should not be forced into being cured if they do not wish to be.

    What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    I should probably read up on it.

    8. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    Grocery shopping with my kids.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

Similar Threads

  1. Asperger's Syndrome and MBTI type.
    By TaylorS in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 230
    Last Post: 06-16-2015, 07:50 PM
  2. Autism and MBTI
    By headlessredhead in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-27-2015, 08:45 PM
  3. [INTP] Girls and women who have Asperger's syndrome
    By greenfairy in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 11-15-2014, 02:13 PM
  4. Autism and brain types.
    By meanlittlechimp in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 08:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO