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View Poll Results: Which option best applies to you?

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  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
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  1. #71
    Junior Member Apsaras's Avatar
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    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)
    I was diagnosed with Asperger's a few months ago, yes. I always test INTP, though I'm not entirely certain I qualify.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?
    Certain bits of the diagnosis I exhibit consistently. Others don't seem to apply at all - though I understand not everyone experiences every symptom.

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?
    It's sort of difficult to say. This is how I've always been - I've never experienced the other end of things, so I have trouble drawing comparisons. I'm introverted... I need to spend a lot of time recharging by myself. I'm very distractible, although I get lost in thought easily. Sound irritates me - so much noise around me, consistently, everywhere I go. That's probably one thing that differentiates me from neurotypicals. They make so much noise, all the time, without saying much of anything in the process. The same loud bits of chatter, time and again.
    I also have problems with textures. I can't eat certain foods - I become physically ill biting into an onion, just because of how it feels in my mouth. I spend a lot of time thinking and pursuing what interests me. I've never needed to study - material generally comes naturally to me - though if something doesn't interest me, I won't pursue it, even if I'm forced to take a class about it.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    I know one very personally. He's more severe than I am. He is obsessed - obsessed - with programming and the aspects therein. He'll work all day programming, then work all night on something similar. My interests aren't as focused. He makes gaffes and says hurtful things unintentionally, not knowing who he may be hurting. He takes statements at face value and has trouble understanding metaphorical/figurative language. He's a literalist to the core. He's got the best of intentions, but it a bit out of sync with the world. An INTJ.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    --

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    Disorder or difference? A disorder is a difference, just with a negative connotation attached. I'm not sure where I stand here. Would I like to be 'cured'? In some scenarios, yes. Could I do it? Probably not. I've been crafted as an individual by dealing with this throughout my life. Who would a 'cure' make me? I understand that neurotypicals see people with extreme low-functioning autism and think "there has to be a cure for this, we need to help these people!" and what have you. I'm not sure what I would do.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.
    I make a lot of offbeat commentary. My father - a loving, accepting man - always appreciated me for being 'outside the box'. I didn't really understand 'the box' and didn't like the notion of it, anyway.'
    The most obvious showing would be in sports. That's an interesting tidbit about Asperger's - physiological affects. I've never been able to catch or hit a ball. I'm an eldest child, and my well-meaning parents forced me into sports. What a nightmare. I stood at the plate one day in a 'feel-good' sort of league where the coach threw pitches until the kids hit one. Sixty-something pitches later, they just told me to take a base.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    Just what I explained earlier about my friend, really.

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?
    Yes. My birthmother - I don't know her too well - has a number of peculiar mannerisms. She's intelligent, but she hates social interaction. She can't stand office life because everything is so abrasive to her. She doesn't like crowds - even little things bother her. If I'm in the front seat of a car, she has to be in the back, and vice-versa. She mooches off of the government by playing the system well, but going to work kills her. She develops addictions easily.

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.
    Sure thing.

  2. #72
    Junior Member GreenElf's Avatar
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    I'm fairly certain I don't have aspergers, but likely some OCD and social phobia.

  3. #73
    Senior Member Lily flower's Avatar
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    My relative is either INTJ or ENTJ. He has never been diagnosed, but he clearly falls in the Asperger spectrum.

  4. #74
    Member Undeclared's Avatar
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    link .......take the test, but it doesn't necessarily mean you have it. I scored 37 on the test. I have never been diagnosed for such a thing. Someone has actually asked me if I had it before....I'm an INTp. I kind of crazy I can tell :/

  5. #75
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    Possibly. I relate alot to the asperger description, particularly when I was young.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?

    Yes, see above question.

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    Difficulty picking up on social cues, poor eye contact, obsessive and highly specific interests.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    I know an XNFP IRL who has been officially diagnosed with autism. It isn't too severe, she is pretty high functioning.

    Other than that the only other ones I know are hanging out on forums like this one. Most are INxx types.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    Someone who is highly fixated on some very specific thing- usually very technical or mechanical in nature. They are more interested in this than in social interaction. Also someone who has difficulty communicating socially and picking up on social cues and knowing the appropriate thing to do/say in social situations. Some austistics are very rigid about routines and having things just a certain way.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    I think its mostly genetic. I do think there should be a cure, yet I feel that neurotypicals need to recognize the unique strengths and gifts that people on the autistic spectrum bring. People on the autistic spectrum disorder should have a treatment cure available to them but should not be forced to take the treatment.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    Some of it is too personal and embarrassing to list here. I know in my childhood, I took what people said literally, I naturally expected people to say exactly what they mean. I had trouble picking up on sarcasm and being able to tell if someone was serious or just joking. I was also brutally honest and said exactly what I thought. I also expected others to be that way as well.

    I had difficulty picking up on social cues, particularly nonverbal ones. I misread peoples' expressions and have gotten in trouble for accusing someone of being angry with me because they looked angry to me when they weren't angry at all.



    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?


    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?

    No

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.

    I have entered my myself into the poll as well, under the option that best applies to me. At a later point in time, I will give my own personal answers to the questionnaire.

    Thanks for participating.[/QUOTE]
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  6. #76
    Junior Member Evening's Avatar
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    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    Yes. Borderline High-functioning Asperger's. INxP. I scored a pretty strong INFP on my first MBTI test at 15 (and I'm convinced I'd have a higher F score if I'd taken it younger); conversely, my Asperger's was also worse - or had more of an impact - when I was younger. Autism in females, being rare itself, has had little research done on it and is thought to express itself different. Much of the common symptoms of Asperger's don't always apply to me.

    I think that says a lot about the reliability of self-testing.

    My secondary school diagnosed it when I was 12. My ex's mother, who I'm still in close contact with, is a psychologist, and was convinced I had it around a year after knowing with (she was not at all surprised when I told her I had it).

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    I found out about it a few months ago, literally soon after I turned 18. In a sense, therefore, it hasn't effected my life as much as it could have. I have grown up thinking myself another variant of normal, and I'm glad I have, as I might have started self-victimising myself otherwise if I saw myself as 'socially handicapped'. It does, however, put my life into an interesting context and explains plenty of things which I didn't quite understand before.

    I switched primary school (elementary school?) when I was aged 7, and had difficulty trying to relate or make friends with children I hadn't grown up with going to nursery with. It took me about two years to make friends. Even then, I was often perceived as 'weird', and willing to do things which many people considered embarrassing or strange. I was also incredibly gullible and just did not see traps coming my way at all. I've always had above-average intelligence (or, rather, academic ability), and have consistently done well in school, which is something associated with Asperger's.

    I still question a lot of societal norms and views (incest is a good example; most people are opposed to it out of sheer repulsion at the thought of it. 'Eww, that's yucky!' logic fails to work with me). A lot of non-verbal social cues suggest Asperger's as well. I have an aversion to eye contact in all forms - I really can't look at someone whilst speaking to them; my mind goes blank if I try and it sort of intimidates me. A lot of my interests I tend to go about in a scientific way. I have a fascination with people and pyscho-analysing them - but I do it by dissecting their actions actively in my mind and then trying to piece them together; it's not a natural process and I can't do it on the spot. I have a similar attitude to art and poetry - I'll break it down, analyse it, split it into pieces and enjoy doing it (as opposed to 'ruining' it by doing it), and appreciate how the building blocks come together to create a whole. A cool solo in thrown randomly a piece of music I'll shrug off, but I'll appreciate how the use of X and Y and Z all come together to create an atmosphere, and how the solo itself acts as the climax. The actual emotional impact of it actually bores me.

    As for non-autists, my view of them is very positive. I think intelligence is somewhat overstressed and overrated as it is. I like to think that I try to appreciate people and look for the good in them.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    None. I know an xSxJ who's convinced she is, but the girl is silly and likes to encourage any perception of her as 'nerdy' as some quirky form of street-cred.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    I have no idea on the cause. I probably know less about it than I should. I doubt it's something that can be 'cured' - probably more likely brain structure, which would imply it to be partially due to genetics and partially due to early development in the womb. Social skills are something you can work at, hence why I think you can learn to 'be social' and 'act social', but your austism won't change because of it.

    I probably agree with the neurodiversity movement in minor cases. However autisim is on a sliding scale, and it's difficult to find a cut off point between a mild case and a severe one, so I don't ardently support it. I would not change my Asperger's, as that would change who I am. I like being myself, for one, and despite my shortcomings, I've had a boyfriend before and have made friends and have enjoyed a lot of life - some of that is down to luck, and choosing a secondary school where I'd be unlikely to be bullied, but a lot of that is because of me. I'm rather cautious about removing any 'autistic genes' with in vitro fertilisation for that reason. If a 'cure' for autism can be offered, it obviously should be voluntary, for the reason that many with milder cases might not want to change.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    There's one I can think of. 'Tis a happy one. There are probably endless situations as a kid where my social cluelessness has become a burden, to the point that I can't think of a specific one which is sad.

    Back in primary school, we had an African guy come over and do an assembly for 'International Day'. He told us a traditional folk story about a stupid caterpillar... I forget the details, but it ended up in the caterpillar being so happy it broke up into segments and each of them did a dance. He picked around twelve volunteers who stuck their hands up, before telling us afterwards we had to dance (otherwise nobody would have stood up). Things like dancing in public = embarrassing, as well as singing in public = embarrassing, or putting my hand up all my time in class = something-you-don't-do-or-else hadn't at all sunk in yet, and didn't compute. When someone told me to dance, and I saw real no reason not to, I'd comply, because why not make them happy, and why would anyone want to laugh at me because of it? (I stopped doing this when people manipulated me and began to become more cynical of people's motivations). So when the guy said do the happiest dance you could, I really tried. I danced like crazy, and let myself go, jumping in the air and dancing on the ground and moving about, and I was completely oblivious to the fact that I looked stupid. Apparently (I was wearing a summer dress) you could see my underwear. The guy was seriously impressed, since it was the most effort someone had honestly tried to put into the dance, in all the schools he'd been to. Afterwards, at lunch time, he ushered me over, and he gave me two braids from a box he had (he let me choose them) and a green and black zebra-style--striped scarf he happened to have. A couple of girls I didn't like particularly wandered over asked for some braids, and he said no, since I had done something to deserve it.

    Getting the scarf and the braids made me happy for the rest of the day. I lost the braids many years ago, but I still have the scarf.


    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?


    My father. I doubt he actually is, but if we consider autism, as opposed to being a concrete thing separate from normality, one end of a scale, with normal being in the middle, then my father would perhaps be on the autistic side of normal, without being on the autism spectrum. He's heavily introverted, like I am, and doesn't talk to people unless he needs to. He adores puzzles and mind games and things which make him think. He's a very intelligent man and if he'd been brought up in a family which had actually tried to make him achieve his potential as opposed to being completely apathetic, then he could have soared, gone to university, and done very well there, and come out of it all for the better. He is more competent emotionally than I am, but out of my parents he is the most 'autistic'. My parents are both mildly quirky - I sort of inherited both sides of that and am rather more so.
    evening
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  7. #77
    Senior Member VagrantFarce's Avatar
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    Y'know, I read all these descriptions that people give about themselves, and if "asperger's syndrome" or "sensory processing disorder" or "ADHD" or whatever-the-fuck didn't enter into the conversation you'd just think that they were shy, geeky types who just need to get out of their heads and connect with people more.

    I get the feeling that being diagnosed with this shit makes it a sort of self-fulfilling prophesy. Suddenly the reason you can't be "normal" is because you have a mental disorder, and rather than addressing the central issue it becomes the "reason" for who you are, and you become utterly resigned to it. It's so depressing to me, especially when you guys seem like normal people who could fit in just fine if you just got some fucking swagger and had the confidence to really feel good about yourselves around other people.

    I can't be the only one who feels this way, can I?

    Oh and for god's sake, this "neuro-typical" talk is a fucking myth. Please don't make the same assumption that everyone else makes - that there's a "normal" way of being, and that everyone else has it figured out except you, and it's such a shame that you're fundamentally never going to be a part of that. It's. A. Fucking. Myth.
    Hello

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