User Tag List

View Poll Results: Which option best applies to you?

Voters
58. You may not vote on this poll
  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
First 5678 Last

Results 61 to 70 of 77

  1. #61
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    972 so/sp
    Socionics
    EII Ni
    Posts
    365

    Default

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)
    Yes, Asperger's Syndrome. INTJ

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?
    IMO it's best described as an abnormal wiring of the brain that results in abnormal processing of sense data which then impairs understanding of non-verbal social cues. The positive autistic traits are not separable from the bad ones, they are different sides of the same coin. I perceive non-autistics, or at least unreflective ones, as having difficulty distinguishing between social norms and objective facts, that is, social norms are treated as if they were inalterable laws of nature.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    My girlfriend, an INFP, also has Asperger's.


    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    I think Autism is genetic and only severe, "low functioning" Autism a disorder in the broadest sense. I am completely against a cure and consider such a thing a form of Eugenics based on prejudices. I am a strong supporter of the Neurodiversity movement.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.
    I and many who know me have noticed that I don't have a racist or sexist bone in my body not because I have consciously rejected them but because I never soaked up the unquestioned social rules racism and sexism are based on in the first place.

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?
    I suspect that my paternal grandfather, an INTJ, had Asperger's. I have an aunt who is severely autistic.
    Autistic INFP


  2. #62
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    I
    Posts
    3,104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    Edit: found it. Thanks to uber. Aspie-quiz
    Took the quiz, my results:

    Your Aspie score: 111 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 78 of 200
    You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits



    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    I'm thinking any introverted NT types, with the introverted ST types following, probably more likely for the ISTJ.

    I'm think the INTJ would be more likely because, as a J, he needs structure and routine and does not like surprises, one of the hallmarks of autistic spectrum disorders.

    And Aspies are likely to be noted for idiosyncrasies which would push them closer to an N type, specifically NT.

    I'm also guessing that the NTPs (particularly ENTP) will more likely be ADD (mental hyperactivity), while the ESTP would be more likely ADHD (physical hyperactivity).

    Also, OCD, I feel, is in the realm of INTJs, because an OCD patient has to do with performing rituals to filter out unwanted thoughts. They also tend to be conceptual people in general. Keirsey also correlated this trait to the Rational temperament, along with a large proportion of autistic traits.

    However, the OCPD patient would more likely be ISTJs. OCPD is what most people associate with OCD, but while the behavior may be the same, the motivations are different. An OCPD patient is the type who is anal about minor rules and details.
    Yeah I could see the ISTJ have Asperger's also, because of the close attention and memory of detailed things.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Lacey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    401

    Default

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)
    Nope.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?
    I've joked about it, but no, I don't think I am.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    I have 12-year-old sister and 8-year-old brother with autism. My sister's is pretty severe, she doesn't speak at all (although she understands certain verbal cues), she has more outbursts, and she can't take care of herself in any way. My brother, on the other hand, is actually pretty social for an autistic kid, and he is SMART. Not a savant or anything, but you can talk to him and he knows what you're saying (although he only speaks in words and short phrases, so it's a one-sided conversation), he can read simple things, and he has a brilliant imagination and sense of humor. He can tell when he's making people laugh. He's pretty self-sufficient too, considering his condition and age. He's (mostly) potty-trained, he can pop certain foods in the microwave and feed himself, and he's actually really good at painting peoples' toes. He knows his colors, body parts, everyone's names, etc. He's aware of the world around him. He has a really good sense of direction too.

    If I had to guess their types...sister: INTJ; brother: ESTP.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    This is the hardest question. I live with autistic people, so I've never been good at describing it in words. It is what it is, to me. So it's hard to explain to other people.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    I have no strong idea or opinion on most of this, but I think there's some genetic connection. My mom has 2 autistic kids, and so does her cousin. There has to be some environmental thing though too, because autism has exploded in recent years. A cure seems like a weird idea to me...autism just seems...irreversible. I don't know. Neurodiversity only makes sense up to a certain point. My siblings, for example, will need to be cared for by someone else for the rest of their lives.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    Heh. I have a ton (I can't think of most of them, unfortunately). But, I think the best one is:

    Once, my sister ran away in the middle of the night, completely naked. The cops brought her home.

  4. #64
    it's tea time! Walking Tourist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    esfp
    Enneagram
    7
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    Your Aspie score: 101 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 95 of 200
    You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

    I have auditory processing disorder, hyperacute hearing, and sensory processing disorder. I don't really have the social issues that go with aspergers, just the sensory issues. I have to avoid loud, crowded places to keep from being painfully overstimulated.
    I'd say more about this but it is late at night.
    I am an atypical type here: isfp.
    MOre later.

    I'm a little teapot, short and stout. Here is my handle and here is my spout. Every time I steam up, I give a shout. Just tip me over and pour me out.

  5. #65
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    So I took that test...



    Your Aspie score: 126 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 70 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie

    I have never considered the possibility of having Asperger's. I don't think that I do. After taking that quiz, I read up on the traits of Aspies and find that I don't really match them that much. I'm not going to answer the OP specific questions (sorry), but I will discuss what I've found out about Aspies in the course of this evening's time-wasting research on the subject .

    For one thing, I read that Aspies are often very literal minded and can take a while to understand a joke. This is not like me. I'm pretty good at handling metaphors, and I can *usually* tell when something funny has been insinuated, though some things admittedly fly over my head (but this happens to everyone at some point, I think, especially if you don't usually pay attention).

    One of the defining characteristics of Aspies (that I read) is that they also have trouble reading and interpreting the signals given by the facial expressions and body language of other people. I can usually tell when someone is sending non-verbal signals of, for instance, annoyance or sadness. Though I will admit that I sometimes have trouble knowing what other people's intentions are, so I end up either defaulting to the assumption that their intentions are bad unless proven otherwise, or that their intentions are good unless proven otherwise, depending on the situation.

    Aspies are said to have intense interests and obsessions with categories of information. I can relate to this aspect probably better than other aspects. Since I was a child, I've gone through many different absorbing interests...dinosaurs, whales (I was the second grade whale expert), Celtic culture, Japanese culture, languages (including, embarrassingly, Tolkien's Quenya and Sindarin), Fighter Jets, Manga, certain musical artists, post-structural theory (this was a short-lived one)...I could go on. Right now I'm still riding my obsession with typology and personality systems, and it's hard to think of other things. Re-reading typology information is often more interesting to me than many of the things I'm supposed to be doing for school. I have friends who are quite obsessive about stuff as well, but I doubt that any of them are Aspies.

    Finally, I've read that Aspies often go into "meltdowns" when they get overwhelmed or stressed. I don't think I really ever melted down in my teenage or adult life, and I don't remember throwing tantrums or anything like that when I was a child. I watched some videos with Aspie children on youtube where they are throwing tantrums, and I can honestly say that I didn't ever do this. I did have a kid in my second grade class who did this kind of thing. I have no idea whether he had autism or not (though looking back, I suspect that he did and I just didn't know about it), but I remember finding him inscrutable and unpredictable. Not unpredictable in the sense that he did spontaneous things, but unpredictable in the sense that I didn't understand where his reactions and behaviors were coming from at all.

    Oh, also, I read that Aspies and other autistic individuals often "stim," which I guess are like odd physical ticks or behaviors (such as handflapping). My younger brother, who is also INTP and who exhibits Aspie traits more than I do, does a weird hand flap. My sister used to tease him about it, and I had no awareness that this was something that autism spectrum people did. I tend to fiddle with things like pencils (I'm a notorious pencil and pen chewer, and I bite my nails), I do wring my hands and crack my knuckles incessantly, and I tend to spin back and forth for no good reason in my computer chair. These are things I observe a lot of people doing, though (I take the pen chewing to another level, I will admit). I don't do hand flapping or backwards/forwards body rocking, I don't think.

    Anyway, I'll end this rambling discussion here, though in the course of writing this I've come across a whole bunch of other stuff about Aspies that I could write and compare myself and others to. I still don't think it's likely that I have it...that test can't really be all that meaningful on a real diagnostic level.

    I am curious, though, how do they diagnose Aspergers or HFA? I know it's usually done in childhood, and usually because the child needs "special" classes or something, or has disruptive behaviors, but I want to know what kinds of tests they run to make the diagnosis. Is it all anecdotal? Do you just basically tell the psychiatrist/psychologist that your child has these behaviors, and they check it against typical Aspie behavior, and then recommend a likely diagnosis?
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  6. #66
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    So I took that test...



    Your Aspie score: 126 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 70 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie

    I have never considered the possibility of having Asperger's. I don't think that I do. After taking that quiz, I read up on the traits of Aspies and find that I don't really match them that much. I'm not going to answer the OP specific questions (sorry), but I will discuss what I've found out about Aspies in the course of this evening's time-wasting research on the subject .

    For one thing, I read that Aspies are often very literal minded and can take a while to understand a joke. This is not like me. I'm pretty good at handling metaphors, and I can *usually* tell when something funny has been insinuated, though some things admittedly fly over my head (but this happens to everyone at some point, I think, especially if you don't usually pay attention).

    One of the defining characteristics of Aspies (that I read) is that they also have trouble reading and interpreting the signals given by the facial expressions and body language of other people. I can usually tell when someone is sending non-verbal signals of, for instance, annoyance or sadness. Though I will admit that I sometimes have trouble knowing what other people's intentions are, so I end up either defaulting to the assumption that their intentions are bad unless proven otherwise, or that their intentions are good unless proven otherwise, depending on the situation.

    Aspies are said to have intense interests and obsessions with categories of information. I can relate to this aspect probably better than other aspects. Since I was a child, I've gone through many different absorbing interests...dinosaurs, whales (I was the second grade whale expert), Celtic culture, Japanese culture, languages (including, embarrassingly, Tolkien's Quenya and Sindarin), Fighter Jets, Manga, certain musical artists, post-structural theory (this was a short-lived one)...I could go on. Right now I'm still riding my obsession with typology and personality systems, and it's hard to think of other things. Re-reading typology information is often more interesting to me than many of the things I'm supposed to be doing for school. I have friends who are quite obsessive about stuff as well, but I doubt that any of them are Aspies.

    Finally, I've read that Aspies often go into "meltdowns" when they get overwhelmed or stressed. I don't think I really ever melted down in my teenage or adult life, and I don't remember throwing tantrums or anything like that when I was a child. I watched some videos with Aspie children on youtube where they are throwing tantrums, and I can honestly say that I didn't ever do this. I did have a kid in my second grade class who did this kind of thing. I have no idea whether he had autism or not (though looking back, I suspect that he did and I just didn't know about it), but I remember finding him inscrutable and unpredictable. Not unpredictable in the sense that he did spontaneous things, but unpredictable in the sense that I didn't understand where his reactions and behaviors were coming from at all.

    Oh, also, I read that Aspies and other autistic individuals often "stim," which I guess are like odd physical ticks or behaviors (such as handflapping). My younger brother, who is also INTP and who exhibits Aspie traits more than I do, does a weird hand flap. My sister used to tease him about it, and I had no awareness that this was something that autism spectrum people did. I tend to fiddle with things like pencils (I'm a notorious pencil and pen chewer, and I bite my nails), I do wring my hands and crack my knuckles incessantly, and I tend to spin back and forth for no good reason in my computer chair. These are things I observe a lot of people doing, though (I take the pen chewing to another level, I will admit). I don't do hand flapping or backwards/forwards body rocking, I don't think.

    Anyway, I'll end this rambling discussion here, though in the course of writing this I've come across a whole bunch of other stuff about Aspies that I could write and compare myself and others to. I still don't think it's likely that I have it...that test can't really be all that meaningful on a real diagnostic level.

    I am curious, though, how do they diagnose Aspergers or HFA? I know it's usually done in childhood, and usually because the child needs "special" classes or something, or has disruptive behaviors, but I want to know what kinds of tests they run to make the diagnosis. Is it all anecdotal? Do you just basically tell the psychiatrist/psychologist that your child has these behaviors, and they check it against typical Aspie behavior, and then recommend a likely diagnosis?
    A good post.

    A child does not need special classes.
    The adults need them.

    But they are not in the classroom.

  7. #67
    it's tea time! Walking Tourist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    esfp
    Enneagram
    7
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    My answers are below:

    Quote Originally Posted by MerkW View Post
    Indeed, the autistic spectrum has been discussed here before, but I have grown curious of personal experiences or opinions.

    Some questions I have:

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)
    No.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?
    Yes, I have considered the possibility. I have the sensory issues but not the social skills issues. My MBTI type is isfp. If I didn't have the sensory issues, I would be an esfp.

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?
    I have been diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, auditory processing disorder, hyperacusis, ADHD, and possibly nonverbal learning disability (which I think is inaccurate for me).
    Because of my condition, I have difficulty with receptive language but not really with expressive language. I can't block out any background noise at all. As a result, I tend to become hopelessly overstimulated in a noisy environment. I have to avoid large crowds because I can't tolerate people brushing past me. When I'm in a restaurant, I have to make sure that I am seated with my back against the wall to avoid having people constantly walking behind me. I can't tune out some sounds and listen to other sounds. So, if there are multiple conversations, and one person is speaking to me, it is very likely that I won't understand that person at all. Certain sounds (especially very high frequency sounds) cause me intense pain. They don't have to be loud; they just have to be the offending frequency.
    When I become over stimulated, I have an excruciating pain in the center of my head. It feels as if my ears have been forced open and the noise was poured in like water. Sometimes, the noise feels like shards of broken glass. When that happens, I don't even know where my body is in space. Everything appears confusing and erratic. I have to go home and go into a darkened room and listen to soft instrumental music. The noise is still in my head. I take ibuprofin and go to bed. It takes several days for the pain to go away.
    I also don't understand people when they talk really fast. They just sound like blah blah blah to me.
    I taught myself to read when I was four years old and couldn't do phonics in school so I was placed in a slow reading group. I was not diagnosed with CAPD until I was an adult.
    I'm really, really bad at sitting still.
    People who don't have my processing problems generally don't understand them. They seem to have the idea that, if the disability becomes inconvenient for them, it can be turned off. I tell people that my condition is a disability, not an annoying inconvenience and that it doesn't have an off switch. With some of the more sensitive folks, that works, but a lot of people are rather insensitive when it comes to things that they think might inconvenience them.


    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    I am not sure. I have family members who seem to have issues with social skills.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    People with Aspergers seem to be focused on a few interests all of the time. They live, breathe, and dream those interests. They also have sensory problems. They have difficulty with nonverbal social cues and they may speak with a monotone. I perceive them as being somewhat different, but as very interesting people. Also they tend to be very smart. I have met people with Aspergers, and I have always liked them.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    I don't know what the cause is and I don't know if there should be a cure. It would be nice, though, not to have painful ears. I would like to see better architecture, with acoustical engineers being called in to design spaces that don't have excessive reverberation and echo. That would be very helpful to me. I think that the neurodiversity movement is a good thing. People who are "neurotypical" need to be better educated about people on the spectrum so that they can be more sensitive to the needs of people who aren't like themselves.


    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.
    I have trouble localizing sound. One day, I was doing laundry. I had just started the washing machine when I heard a frightening sound. Where was that noise coming from? It was very loud and very shrill.
    Oh no, I thought, the washing machine is going to explode!
    I quickly turned the machine off and unplugged it. The noise did not stop immediately. But I wasn't aware of that because I had raced upstairs and had gotten the cordless phone. It was time to call the manufacturer and to get out of the house (just in case the washing machine actually exploded!).
    But then I noticed that the noise had stopped. Perhaps the machine wasn't really going to go ka-boom. I went downstairs, replugged the machine, and turned it back on.
    Ahh. No noise.
    Oh no! The noise has just started again, loud and shrill. Oh. My ears. I'd better brace for a big explosion.
    I dialed the number of the manufacturer. They answered the phone, but I couldn't really make out what they were saying because of all of that noise.
    At that moment, my landlord walked into the house and made some sort of speech sound. He went to the basement, did something, and the noise stopped immediately.
    "Smoke detector," he said, holding up the battery.
    "Oh," I said to the person on the other end of the phone. "I'm so sorry. The noise came from the smoke detector. Thank you very much for your time."
    I told that later on to the speech-language pathologists who were working with me on my auditory processing disorder, and we all got a good laugh out of it.

    8. Same as the above, except for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    No, I can't think of any.

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?
    N/A (I'm not autistic)

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.
    OK.

    I have entered my myself into the poll as well, under the option that best applies to me. At a later point in time, I will give my own personal answers to the questionnaire.

    Thanks for participating.

    You're welcome.
    I'm a little teapot, short and stout. Here is my handle and here is my spout. Every time I steam up, I give a shout. Just tip me over and pour me out.

  8. #68
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7,917

    Default

    I took this test about a year ago and got the "You are very likely an Aspie".

    I think I could technically qualify as one, but I don't think about it or really take it into consideration.

  9. #69
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    4,601

    Default

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)
    No.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?
    No, I have never suspected myself to be, but occasionally in my life relatives have thrown it at me that they think I am. The ones who said that though were all Fe types, who mistook my deliberate and knowing directness for tactlessness/lack of empathy. I was and am perfectly aware of other people's responses - I choose to respond to them differently than they do. Similarly, I'm aware of etiquette and what's expected of me in that area, intuitively. I simply choose to disregard it frequently for reasons I believe valid.

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    My daughter has Asperger Syndrome. It affects us in many ways, chiefly in that she cannot share a bedroom with her sister or anyone else, and this has caused a lot of housing related headaches for us. Also, because she's a girl and it seems most of the literature and studies on the subject have focused on boys, we are often disbelieved about her condition by "laymen", because her manifestation of it is not as "textbook" as some of the male autists we've met through support groups. But it adds an extra dimension of stress and difficulty for me as a parent and her sister, and indeed for her too, in dealing with the usual childhood squabbles and sibling rivalry.

    Also, my father almost certainly was on the spectrum, but was never diagnosed as it wasn't really known widely in his day. However, when as a family my siblings, mother and I talked together about my dad in the presence of a psychiatrist, and also in light of what we know of the condition through my daughter, the conclusion that he was definitely on the spectrum seems inescapable.

    How do I view non-autists? To be honest... I have said in the past that I personally prefer sometimes, the company of people with High Functioning forms of autism. I find the "emotional privacy" that they afford me very relaxing and refreshing, and I find them also very straightforward and direct, again, something I value a lot. I think this implies a lot about how I view non-autists!

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    I know a great many children and a couple of adults with autistic spectrum disorders, whom I've met through support groups and help sessions, mostly with Asperger's or other HFA forms, but one or two with more severe autism. I don't know most of them well enough to be able to speculate about their type, but my daughter is as ENTP as I am, and my father was almost certainly ISTP. You have to get to know autistic people very well I think, to be able to see the individual personality behind the disorder - initially, that is. I do think I'm a bit quicker to perceive it though than many people, because of my prior experience.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    I don't actually perceive it as a disorder as such, necessarily, though I've used that word in this post more for convenience than accuracy. I generally see it as a different way of being, and it irritates me when people express sympathy with me because of my daugher being autistic. I not only love her as my daughter but i like her very much, and she has a great deal to offer and it makes me annoyed that people would try to invalidate that or make out that it's not enough just because of the other things that she can't offer, such as empathy. I think that autistic people can perform a very valuable function in society and should be encouraged to do so, taking advantage of their unique strengths, rather than relentlessly drugged and pushed into trying to be like everyone else.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    It gets my hackles up when people talk about "curing" autism. A friend of mine sent me a link the other week in fact, raving over this exciting "love drug" that could be used to cure autistic people, and he couldn't understand why I just hit "delete". I'm not interested in curing my daughter of her personality. She's perfectly happy as she is, and the only problems she has are from other people being ignorant and intolerant and lacking compassion. To me, that means it's these other people who need to be changed, not her. I find it fairly offensive in fact, I imagine how I would feel if someone offered me drugs that would "cure" all my personality defects - IOW, make me not me any more. Everyone has faults and flaws and I don't see why "normal" ones are just sympathized with whilst those of people with HFA are seen as something that has to be drugged or therapied out of them. Why can't they just be left to develop their personality naturally, in a way that's true to them, like everyone else?

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    NA

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?

    Gosh, every day. My daughter has taken to "being" a boy to cope with things - she finds as she gets older that the level of emotional empathy and social savvy-ness that's required of her to play with girls is well over her head, and so she finds respite in the rather more direct and straightforward play of boys up to the age of about 13. Otherwise, she just hangs out with adults. She just has nothing to say to girls of her own age or older (she's 10).

    Every day though, there are many clashes between her sister and her, which result from a combination of her not being able to see her sister's POV, and her sister expecting more from her in that respect than she's capable of and then being outraged when she doesn't get it.

    Oh also, I have taken her out of school and been homeschooling her this year, as it seems that the sort of "social dyslexia" she has puts her at a distinct disadvantage in the classroom, where instructions and lessons are given in a way that takes no account of how she might view the words that are chosen - some things that she wouldn't have needed pointing out have been told to her in roundabout ways, using figures of speech that she's taken literally, confusing her to no end, whilst other things that she just needed to be told in a direct way, she was left to simply assume - which of course she didn't. She was always being punished for things that, when I talked to the teacher about them and to her, it was clear she had no idea what she had done wrong or why. Also, the work was far, far below her intellectual level even in the top streams, so she simply wasn't learning anything except anger and bitterness at the way she was treated. Barely a month after I took her out of school, her academic performance shot up and, tellingly, she stopped wetting herself - which had been a problem, now I thought about it, since about when she started school - within a week of coming out.

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?
    NA
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  10. #70
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MerkW View Post
    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum?
    No

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?
    No

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?
    A few personally, my roommate's brother has Asperger's. My other friend's sister has autism. My research is related to this field too. I, myself, have, in the past, worked as a facilitator providing ABA to children with ASD and other developmental disabilities (like Fragile X, etc), for about 2 years. So, I have worked with kids that were on the high end of the spectrum, to extremely severe, and non-verbal, to those with dual diagnosis (such as Prader-Willis Syndrome, Behaviour disorders, etc), ages ranging from as young as 2-3years old, to ones as old at 17-18. Then, I was also involved in a group for forensic cases of adults with developmental disabilities - they were charged with various sexual crimes, and the mess with the court/legal system. As for MBTI - Too many to list, and many were too severe to have MBTI applicable to them.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?
    Depends on the degree, as I agree with DSM, that something becomes a disorder when it significantly affects daily living and functioning. For some, I can see the point of view that the world is just not attuned to their 'language' thus the society around them creates the disorder, for others (the most severe), I don't think it's plausible for a world (as we conceptualize it) to ever be able to understand that 'language'. Thus, again, depends on the severity. It's really only a label that has function for governmental support, etc., but, if you truly know the varieties that exist within the umbrella of ASD, I don't think anyone who has worked closely with them can say that ASD neatly sums up the group and their extremely varied manifestations.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?
    In one evolutionary psych class, there was a discussion that, evolutionary speaking, these personalities were advantageous/had a function. Thus, it seems likely, that any thing selected for in evolution, might manifest itself in a handful of cases such that the traits are magnified to a noticeable degree.
    I don't know if I would use the word 'cure', but more like the need for effective management of certain symptoms, geared to specific individual (not as groups, but, individual profile). Like, self-injurious behaviours, zoning out on stims.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.
    Too many to list. One had this obsession with trailing all straight lines with his eyes, so, it was awfully hard to get his 'focus', esp if in a room that's modernized with many sharp lines and angles, so, we had to work in a square bare room. One was ridiculously sharp - savante, but, his behavior problems overshadowed much of his amazing personality. He was eventually too much to handle for his mother, and it was one of the saddest incident in the course of my work, watching his mom come to the hard decision that she couldn't take care of him. He was getting bigger too, and she was a petite woman...I loved working with him because he kept me sharp. One incident I remember, he had a special team, who could handle him, that worked with him. Well, another facilitator (who didn't work with him) had to watch him for 5 mins while his facilitator had to use the loo, and, this newbie thought it would be a cute thing to teach him, making a wish using his fallen eyelashes. As soon as I heard it, I knew where it would lead. By the end of that day, he had physically plucked every single of his eyelashes off his eyes, and with each pull going, "I wish I didn't have eyelashes at all" Not a fun trip to the emergency, with bleeding eyes. I have gotten punched, bitten (still carry that mark ), pissed on, hair pulled by the little buggers - but, they're so awsome, that's it's kinda worth it. And, I got to always be on my toes, never had to go to the gym as my work was my gym. My reward was when I saw that glimpse of their personality, I've never felt so elated by such human nuances as I did when working with my kiddies. It made me appreciate/value the little things so much more. Like if one held my gaze for 5 seconds, or, another, when going through the motions of singing "Patty Cake", he ended with, "bake me a cake for Qre:us and me". HE SAID MY NAME!!! Or, when I would be standing and all of a sudden, this recognition would come to one of their eyes, and to see them run up and hug me. Or to hear the stories of a guy getting permanantly banned from the public transit because he just had to pee, and he did, inside the enclosed bus stop, then proceeded to masturbate, much to the chagrin of those around him. Another, he was 4, loved to stim off my hair, petting it (the feeling of it), and for him, I made sure to shampoo and condition regularly (that was his reward, 1 mins of play with my hair...and I got a massage too! ) Too many stories. Especially when you see their other side, *them*, not just the fantastical stories attached to each of them, but, the essence of these kiddies and individuals....and, as I said, get that glimpse (however brief) into the person inside. It's very rewarding. Although, as a past provider of ABA, I am a firm believer that ABA does not work outside the controlled environment where the therapy is run.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?
    I just loved the challenge of being able to cater to each individual kid, to figure out exactly how I'll get them to connect. And so, when they started to stim, I knew, it was a way of saying, "Qre:us, you're bugging me, so I'm tuning you out!" haha! I learned to speak, not for myself to be understood, but, to engage the other in a way that they *want* to understand ME... hence, speak TO the receipient/audience. And, that has been a pivotal lesson my experience with these individuals taught me. (which, sadly, after not being in daily contact, I am losing....)

Similar Threads

  1. Asperger's Syndrome and MBTI type.
    By TaylorS in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 230
    Last Post: 06-16-2015, 07:50 PM
  2. Autism and MBTI
    By headlessredhead in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-27-2015, 08:45 PM
  3. [INTP] Girls and women who have Asperger's syndrome
    By greenfairy in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 11-15-2014, 02:13 PM
  4. Autism and brain types.
    By meanlittlechimp in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 08:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO