User Tag List

View Poll Results: Which option best applies to you?

Voters
58. You may not vote on this poll
  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 77

  1. #51

    Default

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum?
    I don't know. You've got me wondering again.

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?

    I did at one point suspect it enough to join an AS meetup group.

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?


    I have always know that I think differently from most people. I am rather slow at processing most things except for a select few things (the type of things that show up IQ tests like pattern recognition, categorization, math, etc.) I have a horrible time concentrating, so most things I do go at a snails pace. In the rare event that I can concentrate, I am incredibly focused and often amaze myself on how quickly I can finish tasks. Before I take a first step in almost anything I do, I need to know where it is going, what the point is, and how the particular thing fits into the big picture. This has gotten me into a lot of trouble both at work and school, since I have had drawn out arguments over the "pointlessness" of tasks both with my teachers and bosses. These days I am more quiet/diplomatic about it, but the "pointlessness" of things I don't understand yet is one of my most pervasive barriers to motivation.

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    I've met many. I have only had extended contact with two of them.

    One is my little cousin who seems severely afflicted. He is almost 7 and doesn't speak coherently yet. He runs around and makes a lot of noise, and won't listen to anyone. His teeth are rotting due to lack of care. I would say some sort of E--P based on his activity level and his tendency to want to interact with everyone he meets (despite his interactions being incoherent). He is also always saying something. I think both his parents may be on the spectrum too...and I am a lot like those parents.

    The other one is an adult and also seems severely afflicted. He speaks coherently, but is impossible to have a conversation with. The only responses that he seems to appreciate are "that's interesting" and "mmhmm" and head nodding. Giving your own view point, or even a "I had a similar experience" is met with "anyways..." and a continuation of his monologue (which can be quite interesting at points). However, he holds a steady job, can drive, and has friends who care for him.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    I'll answer this one too, since I have experienced a lot of the "neurotypcial looking in" perspective also because I have met many who were severely afflicted compared to me (if I am at all).

    I perceive it as strangeness in focus that happens at a fundamental level. Everyone filters what the external world gives them and produces a coherent consciousness of what is happening. I think, for autistic people (and everyone on the spectrum), the filtering difference makes it hard for them to map their subjective realities to those of others.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    I never like the label of disorder for anything. I think with the proper guidance autistic people can learn to cope well in the world. I think the use of the very logical and predictable world of computers and mathematics can greatly aid those who have the difference in perception. As "training wheels" of sorts.

    The reason I say this is that math and CS teaches a precise way to communicate that greatly aids mapping different subjective realities to each other. It also teaches flexibility in "translating" those subjective realties between each other. In addition it improves general problems solving skills, and provides a way to deal with "hard boundaries" (things I cannot change).

    Initial development is likely to be slow. I had a horrible time making quick decisions (still do). But I use the laws of probability, etc now to make decisions under uncertainty, and have gotten comfortable with the "anchor and adjust" way of doing things (no matter how flawed it seems).

    As a kid (and often now, too), people would say that I never react to anything. But I learned to spot real and fake smiles by practicing on a website. I also learned to mimic expressions by practicing copying captures of people expressing things. I also practiced keeping track of NLP markers, and have now gotten somewhat decent at the "empathy game."

    I taught myself to say, "I don't know" and "let me think about it" as a means of buying me time, since I get very stressed out when people ask me questions.

    Unfortunately, their particular interest may not be in this area, but I think if their narrow interest can somehow be mapped to more general contexts, they will be better able to handle those contexts and eventually switch to more appropriate strategies in those contexts.

    What I said above is a challenge to everyone, not just people on the autistic spectrum. Relating our own realities to those of others is a challenge that requires a great deal of effort.

    I think the effort is greater for autistic individuals because they have far fewer "common points of reference" to start with.


    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?

    My mom and dad both have some of the tendencies (different ones), but I don't believe they would get an Asperger's diagnosis. My mom has a lot of the sensory overload like issues, while my dad has a lot of the perfectionism/rigid thinking issues. I inherited both.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  2. #52
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    1,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I understand the questions all operated in conjunction with each other (i.e., none really stand alone to designate asperger's, they have to be looked at as a whole)... but some were broad enough to apply to many, many different (and often normal) human behaviors and probably apply to some degree to most human beings regardless of condition or type.
    Jennifer's points here need to be remembered. The test measures based on relative behaviour, as compared to a group. Considering that most of you guys are from the US, where extroversion and P is the norm, you may get a 'lower' score than the rest of the population, however, it may simply mean you are more introverted and schedule-preferring than the average american.

    Quote Originally Posted by Merkw View Post
    Hm. I think I might get around to that sometime. In the mean time, are there any particularly good online tests?
    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    Aside from the link posted by elfinchilde, no. But that said online test is good, if only because it has a really professional-looking graph.
    The graph does have its purpose, you know. The mindweb gives you the relative strengths and from there, you can deduce the likelihood of aspie or not.

    Merkw, have you ever had a formal diagnosis? Based on what cafe has mentioned and your replies, it seems as though you may have high functioning autism. As per my previous post: distinct skills in language, memory, mathematics or music. One of the key traits of savants. Higher than normal IQ--likely to range in 130s-upper.

    Cafe pointed out rightly too: delays as a child in speech. Obsession with specific things/behaviour. One child i knew was obsessed with spinning tops, another with clouds (could tell you everything about cirrus, cumulus, stratus, particle formation etcetc ... ).

    If you'd like, you could show me your mindweb so that i could read it for you? (or in private, if you wish. )

    (apologies if this is a derailment. i have no real idea what constitutes one, actually, since it's all linked to me. am very close to being an aspie myself, if not for the fact that i have a twin and she's normal. )
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  3. #53
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    11,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    Merkw, have you ever had a formal diagnosis? Based on what cafe has mentioned and your replies, it seems as though you may have high functioning autism. As per my previous post: distinct skills in language, memory, mathematics or music. One of the key traits of savants. Higher than normal IQ--likely to range in 130s-upper.
    Hmm... I guess that would make me a savant, then.

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    Cafe pointed out rightly too: delays as a child in speech. Obsession with specific things/behaviour. One child i knew was obsessed with spinning tops, another with clouds (could tell you everything about cirrus, cumulus, stratus, particle formation etcetc ... ).
    Keirsey directly noted this tendency of Rationals in Please Understand Me II.

    For anyone interested, here are my results from when I posted the quiz a while ago.

    However, I don't like that quiz overall -- it says I'd likely be diagnosed with schizophrenia. :rolli:

  4. #54
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post

    Merkw, have you ever had a formal diagnosis? Based on what cafe has mentioned and your replies, it seems as though you may have high functioning autism. As per my previous post: distinct skills in language, memory, mathematics or music. One of the key traits of savants. Higher than normal IQ--likely to range in 130s-upper.

    Cafe pointed out rightly too: delays as a child in speech. Obsession with specific things/behaviour. One child i knew was obsessed with spinning tops, another with clouds (could tell you everything about cirrus, cumulus, stratus, particle formation etcetc ... ).

    If you'd like, you could show me your mindweb so that i could read it for you? (or in private, if you wish. )
    No, I have not ever been formally diagnosed with Asperger's/HFA. It has been strongly suggested by one or two psycho-analysts, though. People have also commented on me having certain talents often found in high-functioning autists:

    I am quite good at seeing patterns and hidden inter-connections.
    I think in a way that combines visual thought with a sort of abstract, patterned thinking. A lot of my thoughts cannot really be accurately articulated into words. I am also rather good at building highly detailed imaginary scenarios and worlds in my mind.

    Things such as rapidly calculating large sums in my head (including calculating the day of the week a given date will fall on), and memorizing large strings of numbers, statistics, visuals, or any other information come easily to me, yet I find this to be, although helpful and amusing, mundane and of not much importance.

    My best and most prized strength I think, is my ability to understand the principles behind how things work (a combination of Ti, Ni and Ne?), especially mathematics. I interpret the world in numbers and mathematics. I dive deep into the concepts of abstract math. I like problem-solving in complex mathematics, and I am often good at arriving at answers in an unusual, different, or very intuitive manner.


    However, I am not good at learning languages. Skills in my native language, English? Quite a breeze. Foreign languages, though, are not my cup of tea.


    I will post my mind-web diagram from the test soon.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  5. #55
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Here are my results for Ms. elfinchilde:

    Your neurodiversity (Aspie) score: 160 of 200
    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 31 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie (neurodiverse)

    Asperger/HFA/PDD: 195 - You very likely will be able to receive the diagnosis
    OCD: 161 - Your diagnosis is very likely correct
    Social phobia: 147 - You very likely will be able to receive the diagnosis


    Last edited by MerkW; 03-05-2008 at 03:47 PM.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  6. #56
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    5,351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merkw View Post
    Here are my results for Mr. elfinchilde:...
    Oh dear. Elfinchilde is female. Aelan is her twin sister.

  7. #57
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    1,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    Oh dear. Elfinchilde is female. Aelan is her twin sister.
    thanks for the clarification, Mom (can i call you that? ). Yeps, merkw, i'm female, thank you very much. I do not honestly think a lot of men would willingly call themselves elves, and child at that.

    btw, INTJMom, compare your own mindweb with merkw, that's what i meant.

    but back to merkw's graph and mbti: (pls correct me on any of the following if they're wrong, as i'm just reading from the mindweb and stats--you should know yourself better, so fit in the patterns for what fits you, yea? )

    -i notice your MBTI % for I and N are 100%. that's extreme introversion and intuition. which would mean that you live primarily in your head, and likely have a lot of difficulty interacting with people. Not that you cause trouble, but that given a choice, you'd prefer to be left alone, or as a wallflower, rather than be at the centre of the party.

    -which correlates with your mindweb: very low scores on LH (neurotypical) social, compulsive and communication. i.e., one who prefers to keep to himself. Will not naturally seek the limelight, in fact, seeks to avoid it.

    -however, your hunting perception and talents are relatively higher (LH side of web again): it means you have a generally fair working idea of society, of human dynamics and how things/people function. just that you prefer to stay apart from all of them; maintain position as an observer.

    -RH side of the graph is where it gets interesting (aspie side):

    -very high scores on perception, communication and talent. aided by relatively high score on compulsion, yet low on activity. Means you work primarily in your mind: there it is very, very fluid. Your ideas can flow from one place to another, in loops that others may not see the patterns of first: for instance, (depending on your mode of intake of information): you are likely able to relate sounds to patterns of mathematics, or visual colours to words, etcetc. Basically, links which no one else tends to conceive of. Also, you can grasp things almost instantaneously, even if no one sees the patterns to them first. Classic INTP, aided by high fluidity in internal communication. You will prefer to specialise in systems that are complex; not for showing off, but simply because these attract you intuitively.

    -however, you may not always articulate them in a fashion which people understand.

    -due to the compulsion, it means you're likely to be very highly learnt in the areas you choose to specialise in. Probably, you tend to go on and on in your head (if not to others) about your pet topics? likely these will be intellectual pursuits, as opposed to working with one's hands etc.

    from your graphs and all that you've said, if your childhood was a peaceful one with no major disruptions (ie, no emotive source attributable for the introversion and N), then, high functioning autism has a very high probability of being diagnosed for you.

    erm. ok. i think i may have said enough. Pls do not be offended by any of the above yea; i'm just reading what the web/mbti says.

    Edit: from what you said, your skills appear to be in spatial perception and mathematics. what's your IQ? perchance a savant?
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  8. #58
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    5,351

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    thanks for the clarification, Mom (can i call you that? ). ...
    Sure, no prob. You're not the only one who calls me that.

  9. #59
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    thanks for the clarification, Mom (can i call you that? ). Yeps, merkw, i'm female, thank you very much. I do not honestly think a lot of men would willingly call themselves elves, and child at that.

    btw, INTJMom, compare your own mindweb with merkw, that's what i meant.

    but back to merkw's graph and mbti: (pls correct me on any of the following if they're wrong, as i'm just reading from the mindweb and stats--you should know yourself better, so fit in the patterns for what fits you, yea? )

    -i notice your MBTI % for I and N are 100%. that's extreme introversion and intuition. which would mean that you live primarily in your head, and likely have a lot of difficulty interacting with people. Not that you cause trouble, but that given a choice, you'd prefer to be left alone, or as a wallflower, rather than be at the centre of the party.

    -which correlates with your mindweb: very low scores on LH (neurotypical) social, compulsive and communication. i.e., one who prefers to keep to himself. Will not naturally seek the limelight, in fact, seeks to avoid it.

    -however, your hunting perception and talents are relatively higher (LH side of web again): it means you have a generally fair working idea of society, of human dynamics and how things/people function. just that you prefer to stay apart from all of them; maintain position as an observer.

    -RH side of the graph is where it gets interesting (aspie side):

    -very high scores on perception, communication and talent. aided by relatively high score on compulsion, yet low on activity. Means you work primarily in your mind: there it is very, very fluid. Your ideas can flow from one place to another, in loops that others may not see the patterns of first: for instance, (depending on your mode of intake of information): you are likely able to relate sounds to patterns of mathematics, or visual colours to words, etcetc. Basically, links which no one else tends to conceive of. Also, you can grasp things almost instantaneously, even if no one sees the patterns to them first. Classic INTP, aided by high fluidity in internal communication. You will prefer to specialise in systems that are complex; not for showing off, but simply because these attract you intuitively.

    -however, you may not always articulate them in a fashion which people understand.

    -due to the compulsion, it means you're likely to be very highly learnt in the areas you choose to specialise in. Probably, you tend to go on and on in your head (if not to others) about your pet topics? likely these will be intellectual pursuits, as opposed to working with one's hands etc.

    from your graphs and all that you've said, if your childhood was a peaceful one with no major disruptions (ie, no emotive source attributable for the introversion and N), then, high functioning autism has a very high probability of being diagnosed for you.

    erm. ok. i think i may have said enough. Pls do not be offended by any of the above yea; i'm just reading what the web/mbti says.

    Edit: from what you said, your skills appear to be in spatial perception and mathematics. what's your IQ? perchance a savant?
    Ah, sorry about your gender. That mistake has been fixed.

    I am not offended by anything. I do not see any reason to be. I think that describes me relatively accurately.

    I haven't really taken an official IQ test, but a psychiatrist has estimated what my range of capability probably is (in terms of IQ, that is). I can PM this, if you want to know his estimate.


    I am not a savant. Your definition of "savant" is incorrect. Savants, by definition, have severe cognitive impairments. For reference, see the following:

    | Wisconsin Medical Society
    Autistic savant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Perhaps you are confusing the term "prodigy" with "savant" ?
    Prodigy would be the apt term to describe one with astounding mental capabilities and a high IQ.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  10. #60
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    type
    Enneagram
    5
    Socionics
    INFP
    Posts
    963

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MerkW View Post
    Indeed, the autistic spectrum has been discussed here before, but I have grown curious of personal experiences or opinions.

    Some questions I have:

    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.

    I have entered my myself into the poll as well, under the option that best applies to me. At a later point in time, I will give my own personal answers to the questionnaire.

    Thanks for participating.
    I am an aspie: INTP MBTI.
    The effect it has on my life is that it makes me wierd and other people are repelled by me. At least judgers and non NF's. It's kinda like hedgehog's dilema.
    Aside from me, no other autistics.
    I think Autism could be genetic and caused by brain differences. Of course I am very much an INTP and I have minimal autism. Just enough to be noticed. If neurodiveristy is aimed to have diferent kinds of minds, then I support it. My anecdote (more like a proverb) is: Imagine that every day you had these incomprehensible creatures called humans that tell you to shape up; don't be wierd, get away from me, shut up! Everything negative flows from them. You don't see the point in any of that, and you just have to weather an onslaught of negativity from the outside.
    I don't suspect of relatives of being autistic, except maybe perhaps for grandmother june.

Similar Threads

  1. Asperger's Syndrome and MBTI type.
    By TaylorS in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 230
    Last Post: 06-16-2015, 07:50 PM
  2. Autism and MBTI
    By headlessredhead in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-27-2015, 08:45 PM
  3. [INTP] Girls and women who have Asperger's syndrome
    By greenfairy in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 11-15-2014, 02:13 PM
  4. Autism and brain types.
    By meanlittlechimp in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 08:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO