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  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
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  1. #41
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Merkw, did you experience speech delays or unusual speech patterns as a child? Do you have a history of sensory sensitivities? Did you exhibit odd behavioral problems (especially ones that seemed not to be age-appropriate) in elementary school? Difficulty transitioning from one activity to another, unusual levels of perfectionism, rigid thinking as a child? Did your play include lining objects up in rows? Did you display any kind of unusual, repetitive movements, especially when stressed or excited?
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  2. #42
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    Aside from the link posted by elfinchilde, no. But that said online test is good, if only because it has a really professional-looking graph.
    My AS/HFA result:

    185 - you are very likely to receive this diagnosis
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  3. #43
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    In response to Cafe, yes, I did have unusually formal speaking patterns as a child. I also was a relatively late talker and late walker, but with a rapid catch-up afterward.

    I used to also have extreme sensitivity to certain sounds such as vacuum cleaners (actually, this I still have) and I also hated things like the little red light that flashes on a smoke detector. Other unusual fears I had were going through a car wash and fear of the hand dryers in restrooms.

    In addition, I became excessively angry when my routine was upset.

    EDIT: Here's a list of Aspie traits I have, which I posted at INTJ Forum:
    • I used to be obsessed with objects that were atypical for people my age, such as:
      • A preoccupation with ceiling fans, and I used to draw pictures of my own.
      • An obsession with speakers and stereos.
        • One time, I got a set of car speakers for my birthday because people knew I was interested in them, and I got a cardboard box and carved holes in it to fit the speakers, and I pretty much built my own stereo box out of it after fitting a car radio into it.
      • I also enjoyed the design of VCRs (the forerunner of laserdisc and DVD players in case you forgot! )
        • And I used to draw pictures of my own VCR designs.
      • When I was first introduced to the original Legend of Zelda game for the NES, I started to design my own underworld maps.
      • Early on, I had a fascination with movies, and every weekend, my grandmother used to take me to the movies and I started making up my own movies in my mind and acting out the scenes.
        • I also went as far as drawing up the posters for my movies.
          • This often got my movie privileges taken away from me because:
            • It interfered with my performance at school.
            • My posters contained rather violent imagery
        • I also drew my own credits for my "mind movies."
        • Despite my fascination with movies and dreaming up ideas, the farthest I ever went to making one was making a claymation movie when I was about 12.
        • I also wrote a screenplay for a movie but I never got around to making it because of:
          • My lack of confidence in dealing with other people.
          • My perfectionist tendencies of wanting my vision to be expressed exactly in the way it appeared in my mind.
          • My lack of access in the technological tools I would have wanted to use to make a movie; I can't afford a George Lucas-esque green screen set or CGI software.
    • I also always played with my shirt tag, especially when it was smooth and silky because I like the texture.
      • Only relatively recently have I started tearing the tags off T-shirts, mattresses, and whatnot.
        • I now collect them, and the soothing feeling of them helps me to think better.
    • When I was a kid, I never played with others. I always played by myself in my imagination.
      • People always thought I was a little crazy because of this.
    • I had very poor motor skills as a child (and I still do), and I always hated the idea of going to gym class. People used to make fun of the way I ran.
    • I was never interested in dating during my adolescent years.

  4. #44
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    Merkw, did you experience speech delays or unusual speech patterns as a child? Do you have a history of sensory sensitivities? Did you exhibit odd behavioral problems (especially ones that seemed not to be age-appropriate) in elementary school? Difficulty transitioning from one activity to another, unusual levels of perfectionism, rigid thinking as a child? Did your play include lining objects up in rows? Did you display any kind of unusual, repetitive movements, especially when stressed or excited?
    1. My parents were never quite sure when the standard age of speaking in full sentences was, so they never paid close attention to when I began to speak. They estimate that I begun speaking a little before my 3rd birthday. I went straight to speaking in full sentences without much baby-babble in between. Interestingly enough, I recall being able to comprehend English and write it at least a year before I actually spoke. Unusual speech patterns? People say that I speak in a monotone, and often use very strange, vague, or idiosyncratic expressions that very few people (if anyone) understands. I have always spoken in a rather formal manner, with flawless grammar.

    2. Sensory sensitivities: Definitely. Virtually my whole childhood, I would always insist upon wearing sunglasses (even when it was cloudy) because I could not bear the sunlight. My parents said that I would through fits because I would be disturbed by the seams and labels on my clothes. Thus, I would often wear the same pair of clothes over and over again. I behaved rather strangely in regard to certain noises. Four noises that felt painful and resulted in me behaving very oddly: the sound of a sweeping broom, the noise created by airplane toilets, the sound of popping balloons, and firecrackers. I still cannot stand these noises at all. I also cannot stand humidity, and I am extremely tolerant towards extreme temperatures and certain types of pain. I often do not notice much sensory stimuli, as I am always in my head. My absent-mindedness and lack of attentiveness to the external world has always been rather extreme.

    3. Behavioral problems in school? Not many. I was rather shy. Teachers complained, though, that I would be tactless, rude, and would laugh in odd circumstances. I would daydream all class, and was thus reprimanded for my lack of attention to what she was teaching. This, however, was merely the result of the fact that I was bored, due to the fact that I had already learned pretty much everything she was teaching. And, yes, I was, and am, extremely perfetionistic. In fact, so severe, that it occasionally is more of a set-back than a benefit. It has resulted in an OCD diagnosis, as well. Regarding switching tasks, I must admit, I am quite bad at multi-tasking.

    4. I have, and have always had, very obsessive interests. My main interest is mathematics and theoretical physics, which I plan on pursuing professionally. I have always, though, had side interests of lesser value. These side interests fluctuate, and often re-occur over a length of about a year. They are usually quite intense, but are still regarded by myself as petty hobbies. I also indulge in creating detailed fantasy worlds in my head.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  5. #45
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    Well, Js prefer the outer world to be predictable and controlled, that's what I meant about "needing" structure. The J has a personal need for structure. I didn't mean needing structure because they were hard to pin down -- in that case, the P needs structure.
    And thus we find structure in structure.

    One hand folds neatly into the other: What creativity exists when our fingers are interlocked?

  6. #46
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I'd say if you were in early elementary school right now, you'd have a better than 50% chance of being diagnosed with high functioning autism, Merkw. In our district, at least, the distinction between aspergers and hfa is whether or not there were speech delays. I don't know if that is a universally recognized criteria, though.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  7. #47
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    I'd say if you were in early elementary school right now, you'd have a better than 50% chance of being diagnosed with high functioning autism, Merkw. In our district, at least, the distinction between aspergers and hfa is whether or not there were speech delays. I don't know if that is a universally recognized criteria, though.
    Interesting speculation.
    However, I do not think that such is readily apparent in my outward behavior. Most people regard me as merely odd and aloof. However, when a friend of mine with Asperger's (she is an INTJ, just for the record) and I compared results on tests in regard to deciphering facial expressions, we found that I scored a few points worse than she did.

    Some test results for the record:

    the Aspie test: 185 - you are very likely to receive this diagnosis
    AQ test: 37 out of 50 (35 was apparently the "average" score amongst Aspies)
    EQ/SQ test: 6 = EQ, 116 = SQ - extreme systemizing
    eye test: 6 out of 36 (25 being average).

    Most of these tests have said that Asperger's is either somewhere between "somewhat likely" and "nearly unquestionable." However, I sometimes question the accuracy of such tests.
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  8. #48
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merkw View Post
    Interesting speculation.
    However, I do not think that such is readily apparent in my outward behavior. Most people regard me as merely odd and aloof.
    My speculation is based on having two kids diagnosed with autism in elementary school right now, so I have a pretty good idea of what they look for. If you were doing fine academically and not causing anyone any extra work or trouble, you'd probably have been allowed to slip through the cracks.

    My older son was red-flagged because of immature social behavior (rolling on the floor during story time, blurting out answers in class, falling out of his chair, difficulty staying on task- he's an extrovert, if it wasn't obvious). He also fixated on bacon for months.

    My younger son was red-flagged because of difficulty staying on task, reading difficulties, and immature social behavior (temper tantrums when he could not do tasks to his standards or he had to transition from one activity to another before he was ready), along with sensory issues (sensitivity to sound, hand-flapping, and 'stimming').
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  9. #49
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    My speculation is based on having two kids diagnosed with autism in elementary school right now, so I have a pretty good idea of what they look for. If you were doing fine academically and not causing anyone any extra work or trouble, you'd probably have been allowed to slip through the cracks.
    Ah yes, this is a rather good point. I suppose that since I was rather shy and never a problem to anyone, people might have dismissed the idea that I was/am anything more than eccentric and withdrawn.

    I am still in highschool (and I eagerly await college). I think my transition from childhood into adolescence has revealed more potential problems. My scrutiny and obsessive-compulsive nature certainly damaged some of my academic performance. I have also been marked down for "potentially morbid tendencies."
    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

  10. #50
    Senior Member MerkW's Avatar
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    "The mathematician's patterns, like the painter's or the poet's must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics..." - G.H. Hardy

    "Another roof, another proof." - Paul Erdős

    INTJ (I = 100, N = 100, T = 88, J = 43)
    Solitary/Idiosyncratic, 5w6 sp/sx
    RL(x)EI (RlxE|I|)- Inquisitive Dominant
    Reserved Idealist
    ILI-Ni/INTp

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