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View Poll Results: Which option best applies to you?

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  • I have been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum condition

    9 15.52%
  • I have not been officially diagnosed, yet I suspect that I might be on the spectrum

    14 24.14%
  • I am not on the autistic spectrum, yet I have a relative who is

    8 13.79%
  • Neither any of my relatives nor I are on the autistic spectrum, yet I know a friend who is

    11 18.97%
  • There is no person in my life on the spectrum, myself included

    16 27.59%
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  1. #21
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    With my roller coaster designs, for example, I tend to be dissatisfied with them and wish to go back into the simulator to perfect what I wasn't happy with. But I think the mindset is different. The J wants things to be just right, but coupled with their N preference, there is a sort of contradiction that is always seeking to change things. The NJ will likely see more mistakes and want to go back and fix them, because they are more dissatisfied with what they feel is an unfinished product.

    NP writers seem to be better at creating metaphorical language and symbolism than NJs, too. I would expect that NJ language would be a sort of pouring of their imaginary conceptions that become concrete to the observer. So from the NJ's viewpoint, they are abstract in their thinking. But because of their J preference, or their inferior Se, if you will, they tend to want to express it in a very concrete manner.

  2. #22
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
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    1. Are you on the autistic spectrum? (if so, please list your MBTI type)

    No

    2. If not officially diagnosed, have you ever thought that it was likely that you might be on the autistic spectrum?

    Never seriously

    3. If either one or both of the previous questions apply to you, how would you describe your autism (or in the case of the second question, possible autism) in relation to your life? How would you describe your condition? How is your life affected by it, if at all? How do you perceive non-autists?

    N/A

    4. This question is for everyone, whether on the spectrum or not: How many people with an autistic spectrum disorder do you personally know personally? How severe is it? If possible, what do you think the would be the MBTI type of the person?

    I know an Aspie. He's functional, but very quirky, and has some eccentric ideas. He's also pretty affable and will talk to (more like "talk at") anyone who isn't perceived as a threat. Not sure about MBTI type.

    5. If you are NOT on the autistic spectrum, how would you personally describe autism and how you perceive it?

    I think it's pretty intense. In a different society, some people on the autistic spectrum might be considered more normal than in this society.

    6. For everyone: What do you think is the cause of autism? Do you think that it is, in fact, a disorder, or rather a difference in brain structure? Do you think there should be a cure? What is your opinion of the neurodiversity movement?

    I think autism originates in the "software," not the "hardware," but that's just a guess. I don't know how it originates. I do not think that a cure would be necessary or desirable, but I do think we should attempt to teach social skills to the ones who want to lead normal lives. I've never heard of the neurodiversity movement.

    7. If you are on the autistic spectrum, what anecdotes do you have that are particularly revealing of your condition, or related to it? i.e. are there any particular moments where your condition has resulted in a comic situation? A sad/tragic situation? A particular situation where it has been a burden? A blessing? Any notable anecdotes related to you being on the spectrum are welcome.

    N/A

    8. Same as the above, accept for non-autists. Any notable situations that you can recall where the subject of autism or an autistic individual was prominent?

    The Aspie guy I knew was particularly adept at describing astronomy-related concepts with great enthusiasm. One night he described the star Betelgeuse in great detail to me, and it was pretty enthralling. However, his social skills were very limited, and when he often found himself with a strong attraction to some girl, he didn't know what to do. He also had a limited sense of his own body and personal space, and so would sometimes get much closer to you than you desired. My Adviser would yell at him for this.

    9. If you are an autist, are there any relatives of yours that you suspect of being on the spectrum?

    N/A

    10. Please fill mark the the option that applies to you in the poll attached to this thread.

  3. #23
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    wildcat! you're here!

    If an interpretation is needed:

    Wildcat's point is that an autistic person, (possible likely, a savant) is likely to be a P, which is why he needs the external structure.

    Because the MBTI types the personality: hence, someone who is totally P, especially in thoughts--which an autistic person would be, since their world is internal--would need a very structured and ordered routine outside. Because all of the energy is going within on the disordered thoughts, so outside disturbances have to be eliminated, things have to be streamlined and kept as simple and predictable as possible.

    right, wildcat?
    right

  4. #24
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  5. #25
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    ...
    I think as far as MBTI types, now that I have thought more about it -- it's like mentally they deal from an NT perspective, but behaviorally they operate in ST mode. Does that make sense? That's why I keep getting mixed reads.
    ...
    That's how I see it, too.

  6. #26
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    That's how I see it, too.
    Yes, seconded. which is why I had initially typed an autist (is this the right word?) as an intp. For the internal world.

    wildcat.
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  7. #27
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elfinchilde View Post
    wildcat! you're here!

    If an interpretation is needed:

    Wildcat's point is that an autistic person, (possible likely, a savant) is likely to be a P, which is why he needs the external structure.

    Because the MBTI types the personality: hence, someone who is totally P, especially in thoughts--which an autistic person would be, since their world is internal--would need a very structured and ordered routine outside. Because all of the energy is going within on the disordered thoughts, so outside disturbances have to be eliminated, things have to be streamlined and kept as simple and predictable as possible.

    right, wildcat?
    I have always felt that this is the way I am. If my surroundings are too confusing, I can feel confused internally. Does that mean I may be autistic?
    I thought it was an INTJ thing.

  8. #28
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    I have always felt that this is the way I am. If my surroundings are too confusing, I can feel confused internally. Does that mean I may be autistic?
    I thought it was an INTJ thing.
    Autism exists as a spectrum. That's why the full name is autism spectrum disorder. There are high functioning autists, including the autistic savants--always an intrigue to me, as they will specialise in one of the intuitive art/sciences: music, maths, language or art--all the way to the severely handicapped.

    May not be autism. May simply be introversion. I get very nervy in and around crowds, loud noises, lights and disturbances too. (although, i have always kind of suspected I had asperger's. But I have a twin, and so, if she's fine, that means i'm fine, too. So i'm just socially awkward. )

    There was a test here some time ago; i can't remember which thread...you can take it and test for the likelihood of receiving an autistic reading?

    Edit: found it. Thanks to uber. Aspie-quiz
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  9. #29
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    "Quenck says inferior extraverted sensing brings "... an adversarial attitude toward the outer world":

    "Dealing with details, especially in an unfamiliar environment, can trigger inferior extraverted sensing in introverted intuitive ... Unexpected events that interrupt planned activities can also (be unsettling)... "
    Conscious Type Development


    Adversarial Attitude Toward the Outer World

    Effective dominant Extraverted Sensing types approach the outer world with eager anticipation of all the wonderful experiences awaiting them. For introverted Intuitive types in the grip of inferior Extraverted Sensing, the immediate reality of the outer world spells difficulty and danger. They expect obstacles and problems to plague them as they move through a strange and potentially hostile environment.

    Their hypersensitivity to potentially dangerous surroundings can promote uneasiness about people as well. "I can have negative forebodings and feel that people are against me," said an INTJ. An INFJ said she "becomes suspicious. Usually I'm tolerant, curious, and compassionate, so 'out of character' for me means I'm unaccepting and frustrated with the world."

    An INTJ said, "I start tripping over things and feel out of control in the external world. I feel like I'm under a dark cloud. I get hung up on some false fact and distort it. I get stressed out about time--too many things and not enough time. I attack others with words and then feel guilty." An INFJ described herself as "shutting down, communicating very little. I misplace things, especially keys and watches. I'm very harsh, critical, not diplomatic. I lose my temper, obsess about details, organize, reorganize, yet nothing gets done."

    Anticipating the worst can often elicit anger and blame in INTJs and INFJs. "I'm moody and gloomy, with sudden deep anger," said an INTJ. An INFJ also describes experiencing deep anger: "I am emotionally aroused and am terribly critical of others. I accuse people of never helping me. I become dogmatic and blast people with facts. If no one is around to attack, I write a scathing letter to someone." Another said, "I internally check off all the events that happened leading up to the 'conflict' and then I verbalize this list with a sense that the impeccable logic of it will convince others I am right and I will be vindicated."

    The altered state of any inferior function is typically accompanied by a lessening of social controls and therefore more frequent expressions of anger. However, the character of the anger may be different for different types. For INTJs and INFJs the "cause" of distress is often one or more "objects" in the environment. The anger directed at either things or people may therefore be more focused, intense, and extreme than with other inferior functions. Introverted intuitive types may be unable to recognize alternative possibilities so that their perspective becomes extremely narrow. This tunnel vision and externalization of blame can produce ruthless results.

    One INTJ said, "I get into verbal raving and am out of control. I regress emotionally and act childish. I feel anxious, exposed, childlike." Another INTJ said, "If I bump my head on a cupboard, I get mad at the world for putting a cupboard there. Others think I'm cursing at myself--but it's really at the inconsideration or stupidity of the cupboard being there." An INFJ observed, "I am angry, unreasonable, totally irrational, closed-minded, and impatient. I feel vulnerable and then become angry at others for it. I can't communicate with anyone. I am hard, callous, unfeeling, and I have not energy to be bothered with anyone else."


    I have experienced these things many times.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    I have always felt that this is the way I am. If my surroundings are too confusing, I can feel confused internally. Does that mean I may be autistic?
    I thought it was an INTJ thing.
    I tend to think mildly autistic behavior (Asperger's) is the INTx type (with a grain of salt, naturally). Behaviorally, they seem like SJs on a superficial level because of their desire for structure. At an early age, the INTJ types are reported to stubbornly resist playing with other children. The repetitive motor behaviors and outbursts of rage frequently observed in autistics is, I hypothesize, due to an inferior Se function.

    The ISTJ would more likely escape a diagnosis because their academic and behavioral performance is acceptable in the school environment. Theoretically, stressed ISTJs tend to develop a miserly, pessimistic, and passive-aggressive attitude -- exercising of their inferior Ne in a negative fashion. Stressed INTJs get caught in the moment, engaging in excessive physical pleasures, such as eating, drinking, or yelling -- exercising of their inferior Se function in a negative fashion.

    Also, the ISTJ and INTJ's respective inferior functions are also used to satisfy their dominant. The ISTJ can use Ne to maintain an Si illusion that "everything is fine," the INTJ will use Se to maintain Ni's world of conceptual fancy, such as by repetitive motor acts.

    I believe Wildcat or someone else posted a link to an Aspie forum thread a while back that recorded MBTI types. They were overwhelmingly INTJ, followed by INTP. A bit farther behind, but the next most popular set, were ISTJ and ISTP. And I'm not entirely sure, but I think INFJ may have ranked higher than ISTJ and ISTP.

    EDIT: The link that elfinchilde gave was what I found at INTJ Forum. And the majority of the people who scored high on it there were INTJs, while the ST types scored significantly lower.

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