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  1. #1
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
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    Do people think just because a decision is made quickly it's a bad decision?

    I make what could be called "snap decisions" and I'm not right all the time but my success rate is pretty good. I don't think it's impossible to go into a situation and size what's going on fairly quickly and arrive at an accurate conclusion.

    ETA:
    BBC NEWS | Health | Snap decisions sometimes the best
    Why Snap Decisions Work

    Gigerenzer cites this investment case study in his new book, Gut Feelings: The Intelligence of the Unconscious, to bolster his central point: that intuition often trumps more considered reason. The author is director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior & Cognition at the renowned Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. If his thesis sounds a lot like that of the 2005 best-seller Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell, it's because Gladwell drew heavily on Gigerenzer's research. But the scientist goes a step further by explaining just why our gut instincts are so often right. Gigerenzer is not nearly as clever a writer as Gladwell, a star at The New Yorker, but the new book does serve as a useful and clearly written tutorial on decisions and how to make them.

    Intuition, it seems, is not some sort of mystical chemical reaction but a neurologically based behavior that evolved to ensure that we humans respond quickly when faced with a dilemma (e.g., fight or flight). Too much data, however, throws a monkey wrench into the process. The more variables we consider, the harder it is to make the "right" decision--as anyone who has faced an aisle full of shampoos knows.
    Relationships have normal ebbs and flows. They do not automatically get better and better when the participants learn more and more about each other. Instead, the participants have to work through the tensions of the relationship (the dialectic) while they learn and group themselves and a parties in a relationships. At times the relationships is very open and sharing. Other time, one or both parties to the relationship need their space, or have other concerns, and the relationship is less open. The theory posits that these cycles occur throughout the life of the relationship as the persons try to balance their needs for privacy and open relationship.
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  2. #2
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    Decisions are rather easy for me to make because of what you cite--intuition. My subconscious is constantly collecting information and rearranging my perception of the world, and so when it comes time to make a decision, I often know just what to do and am comfortably confident in my choice.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    *Hesitates*



    YES!



    NO!!



    WAIT, YES!!

  4. #4
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
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    "A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow"
    - General George S. Patton (ESTP).

    Pretty much gives my view on the matter
    Delaying decisions are generally bad. You can always alter the plan while it is being executed or after, if it's wrong.

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  5. #5
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Decisions are rather easy for me to make because of what you cite--intuition. My subconscious is constantly collecting information and rearranging my perception of the world, and so when it comes time to make a decision, I often know just what to do and am comfortably confident in my choice.
    I don't think they mean intuition in the MBTI sense, although I did get the idea for this thread from here.

    If we were to try and match to MBTI, I'd think that EJs would have an advantage ( ) in snap decision making. I also want to emphasize that snap decisions aren't necessarily uninformed decisions it deals mostly with initial sense impressions. If that's the case, wouldn't sensors have an advantage over intuitives in this regard?
    Relationships have normal ebbs and flows. They do not automatically get better and better when the participants learn more and more about each other. Instead, the participants have to work through the tensions of the relationship (the dialectic) while they learn and group themselves and a parties in a relationships. At times the relationships is very open and sharing. Other time, one or both parties to the relationship need their space, or have other concerns, and the relationship is less open. The theory posits that these cycles occur throughout the life of the relationship as the persons try to balance their needs for privacy and open relationship.
    Interpersonal Communication Theories and Concepts
    Social Penetration Theory 1
    Social Penetration Theory 2
    Social Penetration Theory 3

  6. #6
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    I wasn't talking about intuition from an MBTI sense.

  7. #7
    Procrastinating
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    It all depends on the gravity of the decision's impact. If I'm looking a rather pricey purse and assessing its feasibility with my existing wardrobe... I might make a snap one. If, on the other hand, the decision is whether or not to remove life support, not so. I guess, pre-existing familiarity of the subject also applies. If I'm already in some way experienced, with one or two new variables, it might appear to be a snap one but that would be debatable. This reminds of another thread. I addressed Army Officers there. In school they are encouraged to make "snap" decisions, particularly in combat, but are they really since they've been through training?

    Edit: While I can take forever to make a decision sometimes (usually) because I gather so much info and paralyzed by it, I also have a reputation for being someone you want present in an emergency... like someone getting injured... during that kind of situation, I seem to shift into some gear that allows me to act immediately and decisively while others around me seem paralyzed. If have not had special training for this though... I do, however, seem to go to pieces when the emergency is over. lol

  8. #8
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    EJ's and sensors might have a benefit, but it's hard to tell -- there are many many factors.

    For example, Si-primary people -- are their sensory impressions more apt to help them (if they are in a situation similar to their past experience) or go against them (if they are in a new situation)?

    Will Se people do better in just responding to the environment, rather than instinctively connecting it up with past experience that might or might not be true?

    I am thinking that both Se and Ne people might do better in this regard, because they are naturally looking for external data (whether the data itself or the patterns of the data) and thus responding [actually, FLEXING] to it.

    Context also changes things. If someone's in a situation where they are afraid or otherwise feel they HAVE to take an action, they might just go with instincts and be locked in. If there is less imperative to act, some people might get into analysis paralysis or just second-guess their inclinations.

    Still, I know I've read of experiments where people are basically encouraged to go with their hunches (such as when evaluating a teacher based on a few seconds of video), and it seemed remarkable that we can often "catch the essence" of someone or something (regardless of type) based on just a short snapshot.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  9. #9
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    Snap decisions work most of the time for complex problems... Studies have been done on this. (Published in Science oh 2 years or so ago... in an experiment selecting the car with the best overall attributes... one group was told to rationalize their way through the problem, the other group was only given enough time to read it then was assigned mental distraction tasks. The two groups then make the selection. The non-rationalizing group did better for more complex problems). Obviously knowledge of the subject at hand influence your success rate. The more knowledgeable you are, the better you're at making snap decision on that subject. Afterall, if you know nothing about the problem... a snap decision is no better than random guessing.

    Tying that to type... ooo that's a fun one.

    I agree with Jennifer that Se types probably do better at task requiring interaction with the environment.
    Not sure how Si comes into play... well I guess if they remember seeing the same type of problem coming up. They'll be quick to apply the same method to solve it.
    I know for INFJs, we're quick at making snap judgments about people. Especially for assigning people to groups and tasks. Everything else for me though is a slow and laborious process.

    Perhaps it has to do with knowledge? That different types pay more attention to different things and thus pick up knowledge in different areas... making them more accurate in certain types of snap decisions.

  10. #10
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    I tend to trust my gut reaction to things so I can go with what can seem a snap decision alot of the time. It does work out for me 90% of the time and I rarely regret.

    As night said, there are a series of studies that show this. I've read some papers saying that people perform better in card games if they take into account their visceral reactions. Also, there is a theory in psychology called "unconscious thinking" which states that people are better at making decisions involving many criteria after "not thinking" rather than "consciously thinking" about them. In other words, have a good night sleep before choosing which house or car you're going to buy.

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