User Tag List

First 6141516

Results 151 to 158 of 158

  1. #151
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    Entering this discussion very late - and I'm Canadian, not American - but I'm guessing that some Americans get very precious about the "I'm Irish" sort of thing and that would annoy a lot of Europeans. ESPECIALLY if the person who is identifying themselves as Irish, or whatever, has a real lack of knowledge about the country they claim to identify with - I can easily imagine that happening.

    Irish is probably a particularly fraught area. Obviously there are a lot of Irish-Americans but for quite a long time (and probably still somewhat) if you were really keen on identifying yourself as Irish in the US it may have had something to do with the IRA or whatever. They did get a lot of support from America. That whole political area is very fraught and it's still not over, from the sounds of things.

    I grew up in Canada, have lived in Ireland and now live in England. My mother is Finnish (and we used to spend summers there when I was a kid) and my father is Canadian of English-Irish extraction, mainly. I have always considered myself Canadian. I grew up there, lived there till I was 23 and identify more with Canada than any other country. I do tell people "I'm half Finnish" or "a lot of my ancestors came from England" or whatever. But I would never call myself "Finnish" or "English". And DEFINITELY not Irish The thing about my Irish connection is, it's largely Anglo-Irish...some of my Yorkshire ancestors emigrated there, my grandfather was born in Dublin and educated in England and eventually moved to Canada. I never knew him, sadly. He would definitely have been considered Anglo-Irish but apparently he eventually considered himself Canadian.

    I will admit to having some romantic ideas about ancestry, though I wouldn't share them with everyone. I guess they are sort of Jungian and mainly artistic/aesthetic/emotional more than anything. Basically, I think it is possible to feel strong and unusual and otherwise inexplicable connections with a country that your ancestors come from. After living in Ireland for three years, as much as I like the Irish and have/had some good Irish friends, I felt that I was anything but "Irish". I just don't think the national character/temperament reflects mine hardly at all. In fact, I feel like I have very mixed "Anglo-Irish" feelings about the place! On the other hand, I feel a very strong connection to England and think I may end up staying here long-term (though the thing is, I live in London, and it's London more than anywhere else I feel that connection to - and London is not England!). A lot of my ancestors are definitely from here. I don't know, maybe it's just romanticism. I still love Finland but since my grandmother died more than fifteen years ago I've only been once. I do feel a connection, of course, but it's more of a childhood connection. I never learned the language properly. And while my mom is far more Finnish than Canadian (she does not consider herself Canadian at all though she's now lived there the majority of her life), I don't think she identifies all that strongly with Finland either. She's kind of her own nationality.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  2. #152
    Starcrossed Seafarer Aquarelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    3,532

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    In NZ's case, the settlers were successfully brainwashed into becoming loyal and adoring Englishmen, regardless of which nation they originally came from; it was a cultural homogenisation of sorts. It was a rather amazing feat considering so many (such as the Scots and the Irish) have traditionally despised the English. Of course some elements of the cultures were retained (predominantly Scottish culture because so many emigrated to NZ) but they were watered down and kept secondary to the dominant English culture - and even the Englishness is so vague and non-specific. We certainly have nothing to parallel the American cultural ties.
    Hmm, that's interesting - thanks for the insight!
    Masquerading as a normal person day after day is exhausting.

    My blog:
    TypeC: Adventures of an Introvert
    Wordpress: http://introvertadventures.wordpress.com/

  3. #153
    Senior Member Fan.of.Devin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Socionics
    INT-
    Posts
    294

    Default

    I'm 25% Quebec French and 25% Bohemian (Germanic-originating Czech Republic folks) on my father's side of the family, and my mother's side is so WASPy and convoluted that it's difficult to track... But probably some English, Scottish, Dutch... I do know I have a Native American great grandmother on that side.

    I don't feel particularly much affinity to the culture of my ancestors, whatever that may be, and honestly, I wouldn't really care if I didn't know anything at all about my ethnic/national origins.
    But hey, thanks for the healthy and diverse gene pool, and for settling in a relatively nice place!
    INTP 4w5 SX/SP
    Tritype 4/5/8

  4. #154
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    I watched an episode of House Hunters International the other day about an Italian-American who wanted to "get back to her roots" by buying a vacation home in Italy. She was taking Italian language classes. She said, to paraphrase, "I just feel so connected to the culture."

  5. #155
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rhinosaur View Post
    I watched an episode of House Hunters International the other day about an Italian-American who wanted to "get back to her roots" by buying a vacation home in Italy. She was taking Italian language classes. She said, to paraphrase, "I just feel so connected to the culture."
    Did it seem somehow authentic, or did she seem like a flake?
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  6. #156
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    Oftentimes (at least in this area) Italians marry other Italians so ethnically she could be full blooded Italian. Which obviously she would lose just by living outside of Italy.

  7. #157
    resonance entropie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    783
    Posts
    16,761

    Default

    Only lewdy people in Italy ! You always come there innocently as a german

    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  8. #158
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEI Ni
    Posts
    7,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Adasta View Post
    I suppose if all you know about advertising is "TV & Hollywood", then sure.
    The point is, advertising is not a true reflection of a culture or its people. I can't see the relevance of this to the discussion anyway.

    You speak about condescension; I'm not merely a passive observer of America. I have in fact been there, several times as well as knowing many Americans.
    Well, doesn't that make you the expert, haha. You are talking to actual Americans born & raised here, surrounded by other Americans. Don't tell me you know more about our culture than we do. You really don't see the hypocrisy in that, considering the topic at hand & your stand on it?


    Again, you're conflating two things. Recognising one's ancestry is one thing but explicitly aligning oneself with it is entirely another.
    No, hon, you're conflating two things. You seem to think that when an American states they are "Irish" in response to a question that concerns their ethnic heritage, they are denying their American nationality and/or trying to "steal" the identity of a nation they do not belong to. I think its been explained that by far, the average American will identify their nationality as American in a foreign country, when asked where they are from they'll name the city/state/USA, but in response to questions which clearly are seeking their ethnic heritage, they may say "I'm Irish" or whatever. The two are not conflated, but neither are they mutually exclusive. You can be both an American and recognize your heritage connected to other countries.

    As mentioned, in some cases, there IS a direct influence from a culture on a region in the US, so there has been a fusion of sorts, and to NOT recognize that seems to be a sort of denial. People from the east coast are markedly different from people in the southwest (amongst Americans), and I DO see a connection to the countries which colonized and dominated the areas. No doubt, they are still "American", but the nuances are significant enough to note at times & the origins of those differences seem rooted in the heritages of the people. What is so hard about that to grasp?

    I don't see how you can't the positives in this. The less clear the divisions between people based on nationality & ethnicity, the better, IMO. People start to relate to larger chunks of the world instead of having an "us vs. them" attitude.

    Only because you've inferred something different to what I had originally said.
    You're inferring something different to what Americans actually do, on the whole. Knowing a few individuals who are obnoxious about their heritage & viewing "Jersey Shore" as some kind of standard is not any accurate picture of the average American & how they view their heritage. What I've described is much more accurate for the common American: a curiosity into one's personal past & enthusiasm for differences in cultures, not a usurping of another countries cultural identity in a denial of one's own.

    I'd be intrigued by an explication of your analysis.
    No, you explain to me why you're so eager to criticize cultural quirks of Americans. I am just as puzzled, and insecurity seems the obvious answer. Or do you approach all different cultures the same way? Such an attitude is considered rather bigoted here, to be that negative towards something & closed to understanding it just because it is "different" from your own culture. Although, that attitude seems to come from feeling threatened in some way, hence the idea of an "insecurity".

    Okay, if I were to take a stab at it, maybe it gives you a sense of superiority to view Americans as culture-less baboons who are so absorbed in being American they know & care little about the rest of the world. So when a different picture emerges, one of an American who is so fascinated by their cultural heritage that they venture to look into it & mention it from time to time, and it disturbs your previous idea, you quickly need to turn it into something disdainful to reconcile the two & feel superior again. You latch onto the few extreme examples who make your case & once again feel at ease in your ivory tower. You tell me why you need to feel superior though.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

Similar Threads

  1. [Fi] How do you get in tune with yourself?
    By gretch in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 07-24-2016, 07:13 AM
  2. [INTJ] Why do INTJ still keep in touch with their exes... too much?
    By ImNoBozo in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 10-23-2015, 06:52 PM
  3. Replies: 35
    Last Post: 05-10-2014, 02:03 PM
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-06-2007, 04:11 PM
  5. These S people with their tiresome case against N
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 09-17-2007, 11:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO