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Thread: PMAI Archetypes

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    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    Default PMAI Archetypes

    About the PMAI® Archetype Instrument

    People are storytelling creatures. Listen to the conversation in a restaurant, at the water cooler, or on an airplane, and you will find that the majority of what is said is in the form of stories. Carl Jung, a founding father of modern psychology, contributed to our understanding of these stories through the concept of the archetype—the shared myths, themes, images, characters, patterns, and symbols ever present in our lives and our culture.

    The PMAI® (Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator®) is the world's first scientifically validated archetype assessment tool, and it opens a window into the patterns of our unconscious stories and provides a path to self-understanding. Once we are aware of the archetypes that are active in our lives, we can decide how and when to use them, and which ones may need nurturing or further development.


    Created by Carol Pearson, Ph.D., and Hugh Marr, Ph.D., the PMAI instrument does for archetypes what the MBTI® instrument does for psychological type; it makes the theory clear and applicable for everyday life.


    Archetypes: Discovering Unconscious Patterns

    "Why did I do that. again!?"
    "Why do I keep ending up in the same situation?"
    "Who is the perfect life partner for me?"
    "What kind of job would I really like?"

    At one time or another, we all ask ourselves questions like these.

    Such questions are usually easier than their answers. We don't always know why we do what we do. In the stories of our lives, we often find ourselves in roles we didn't even realize we chose to play.

    Psychologist Carl Jung, one of the great minds of the modern era, called these roles and characters archetypes. He proposed that people go through life drawing from a repertoire of instinctive roles: father, mother, child, lover, creator, warrior, caregiver, and an untold number of others. Jung claimed there are as many archetypes "as there are typical situations in life."

    Each of us is capable of playing any one of these countless characters at any time in the stories of our lives. Yet, out of the countless archetypal roles available, each of us uses a select few more frequently than others. These are called our "dominant archetypes."

    Often the characteristics of a dominant archetype fit a particular situation or challenge. But sometimes we're like the proverbial hammer that sees only nails, applying the same solution even when the situation demands a different approach. We're blind to other options lurking outside our usual attention, often operating unconsciously. In extreme cases, the resulting self-deception or lack of self-knowledge may be harmful—"there is no lunacy people under the domination of an archetype will not fall a prey to" (Jung, 1959).
    Archetype assessment: Becoming conscious of their influence

    Identifying which archetypes are influential in our lives can thus lead us to self-discovery, self-awareness, growth, and self-actualization. Consciously choosing the right archetype for each chapter in our life story can create a more fulfilling, successful life, where we use our archetypes instead of being controlled by them.
    Found at capt.org

    Using the PMAI® and the MBTI® Instruments Together

    "This failure to holistically harmonize the types with the archetypes is
    the central intellectual cause of the split in the Jungian family."
    JOHN GIANNINI, Compass of the Soul

    Millions of people around the world know their "type"—the result of completing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® assessment. The MBTI® instrument is a tool created by Isabel Myers, based on Carl Jung's personality type theories.

    Others know Carl Jung for his concept of the archetype, and consider archetypes to be the "principal structural idea" of Jung's psychology.

    CAPT publishes the Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator® (PMAI®) which applies the same successful assessment approach of the MBTI instrument to the assessment of archetypes. The PMAI® assessment measures the influence of twelve archetypal themes for individuals, and when used in conjunction with knowledge of psychological type preferences gives greater insight into the complexities of being human.
    PMAI and MBTI Logo
    Type and Archetypes - Differences and Similarities

    Because type and archetype are concerned with different aspects of the total psyche, an individual who takes both the PMAI and MBTI instruments will gain a deeper self-understanding. Some of the key differences in the information provided by learning both one's type and archetype preferences include:

    1) Type is more descriptive of our cognitive style. Type describes "how" we prefer to function. Archetypes are more concerned with the forces that motivate our functioning.

    2) Type has fewer dimensions. There are only four dimensions of type as measured by the MBTI instrument, but, as Jung wrote, "there are as many archetypes as there are situations in life." The PMAI instrument looks at twelve important archetypes.

    3) Archetype profiles change. Type theory maintains that preferences are inborn and lifelong. Because there are so many archetypes available in our collective unconscious, however, different ones are likely to be more influential at certain stages or situations of life. Assessing both type and archetype, therefore, provides more information, encompassing both dispositional and situational influences upon personality.

    4) Archetypes are very influenced by culture. People who share type preferences perceive and judge in similar ways, regardless of their countries of origin. In contrast, archetypes are influenced by "a person's culture, setting, and time in history" (Pearson & Marr, 2002). Thus, both societal culture and smaller subcultures can profoundly influence archetypes.

    5) Archetypes link to our unconscious. Psychological type is partly, if not primarily, a conscious activity, with type functions either described as "modes of consciousness" (Hillman, 1974, p. 84) or ranked from "most conscious" to the "essentially unconscious" inferior function (Quenk, 2002) In contrast, archetypes are the "contents of the unconscious." Assessing archetypal influence, therefore, can provide a window into our deepest inner levels.

    Using the PMAI and the MBTI Instruments Together

    By studying results from the MBTI and PMAI instruments used in combination, CAPT has confirmed predicted relationships between these two measures. For example, per Pearson & Marr (2002), the Seeker archetype is largely concerned with potential—visualizing and pursuing possibilities. High Seeker scores on the PMAI assessment are associated with a preference for Intuition on the MBTI measure (McPeek, 2007).

    But combining MBTI and PMAI results might tell us something important and unique about our Seeker. A judging function preference for Thinking would orient a Seeker towards facts, accuracy, and knowledge—a "search for truth." A Seeker with a preference for Feeling will be concerned with harmony, contentment, and human values—more like a "search for bliss." Each may thus seek different goals or follow divergent career paths—for example, a truth Seeker as a cancer researcher and a harmony Seeker as a marriage counselor.

    There are many more examples of the interaction of type and archetype preferences. Measuring both affords a deeper self-awareness, encompassing both conscious and unconscious processes, lifelong and life-situational tendencies, and preferences for behavior that range from fundamental to nuanced.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    I've found little information on PMAI archetype assessment. I was trying to find a free test, or a link that described the archetypes in detail.

    What I found was this:

    PMAI™ Results Sample Report
    This report has been generated specifically for you based on the answers you provided on the
    Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator® instrument. Included are your scores for all twelve
    archetypes, descriptions of 3 archetypes for which you scored highest, and a description of
    archetype for which you scored lowest, also called your "shadow" archetype.
    Scroll down this page to view your report. You may print this report or return to it by typing
    your access code on the sign-in page http://www.capt.org/pmai.htm.
    What the scores signify:
    24-30: These are the most active archetypes in your life. If you have no scores in this range,
    then the top two to four in the next range are your most active.
    18-23: These archetypes are likely to be available to you when you need them, but do not
    determine how you see the world (unless they are your highest).
    12-17: These archetypes are not often expressed in your life currently, and you may have
    difficulty understanding people who express them.
    6-11:
    You may actively disown these archetypes, either because you have internalized a
    belief that they are undesirable or because they may have been over-expressed in
    the past.
    The archetypes for which you scored the highest are printed in bold. These archetypes are
    likely the ones that are most active in your life now, serving as allies and defining the stories
    you are living. When you receive the Introduction to Archetypes book, you will be able to relate
    the individual scores for each of the twelve archetypes to how active or inactive they are in
    your life.
    Your PMAI Scores:
    Creator - 27
    Sage - 27
    Jester - 27
    Warrior - 22
    Ruler - 21
    Seeker - 21
    Lover - 19
    Magician - 17
    Innocent - 17
    Caregiver - 15
    Destroyer - 12
    Orphan - 10
    PMAI, Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator and the Archetype Icons are
    registered trademarks or trademarks of Carol S. Pearson and Hugh K. Marr.
    Copyright 2002, 2007 Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc.
    If the Creator is active in your life, you assume what can be imagined can be created.
    At your best (now or when you fulfill your potential), you are highly imaginative and even inspired, and your skill
    level allows you to create with ease. You have moments when the ideas just flow and creativity seems effortless.
    You have a wonderfully developed aesthetic sense and surround yourself with things that reflect your taste. You
    have the potential, moreover, to create your own life as a work of art, so that you avoid the ordinary, the shallow,
    and the mundane, opting for more satisfying ways of life, even if this means that others do not always understand
    why you live the way you do.
    When problems arise, you seek inspiration to develop a clear vision of how you want to remedy them, to decide
    what you want to create to put in their place, or to choose what other innovative steps you might take. Or, you
    divert yourself by undertaking some satisfying creative project, believing, often correctly, that the answer to how to
    handle the problem will come to you in the process.
    You tend to notice the need for new inventions or interpretations. You also focus on the resources that help you
    innovate and on ways to enhance your skills. You know that if you open your eyes wide enough, you will find what
    you need to be successful. You also have a highly developed critic and generally notice every flaw in what you and
    others do, which could lead you to feel inadequate to the task and dissatisfied with life.
    You may want to guard against the Creator's tendency to reduce life to raw material for art (as in a cartoon
    depicting a writer who keeps one hand on the keyboard while he makes love with his sweetie), robbing life of the
    joy of felt experience. The Creator also may become overwhelmed as a result of taking on so many projects. Like
    weeds that kill a garden, too many projects can sap the joy out of an otherwise great life. When the inner critic gets
    out of control, Creators may undermine their own confidence and that of others.
    You like and live stories involving the many guises of inspiration and their unpredictable consequences such as
    Alice Walker's The Color Purple, in which a character changes her life, in part because she starts to write about it and
    hence understand it. In Fried Green Tomatoes, the creative act of telling a story becomes a life-changing force in the
    life of another character. You also may relate to stories of artists, inventors, or entrepreneurs who have the
    imagination to envision something admirable and then the skill to make that vision a reality. Unless you have
    wealth, you may empathize with the difficulties (often portrayed in literature) faced by artists who live in poverty
    because they will not compromise their standards or allow their creativity to be co-opted by others (as in the film
    Amadeus).
    As a leader, you are (or could be) entrepreneurial, innovative, and unorthodox.
    You want to be seen as grounded, practical, and having the ability to create something the world needs, so you
    may avoid doing things that make you seem like a stereotypically wild-eyed, crazy artist.
    Others may appreciate and even envy your imagination and taste. However, they may have no idea how much
    dedication and hard work is involved in creating anything of real worth, minimizing what the outcome costs you.
    They may even see you as elitist or eccentric, perhaps even immoral (you know those artists!) and someone not to
    be trusted.
    You may (or do) benefit from:
    Taming your inner critic so that you become less critical of others and yourself
    Remembering that anything worthwhile takes time
    Moving from an ego-oriented focus on whether what you do is good enough to an attitude of service or being
    a channel for the muse or the vision to be expressed
    Balancing artistry with being a responsible, thoughtful person (avoiding the trap of excusing self-indulgence)
    Balancing the virtues of the Creator with those of the Destroyer
    PMAI, Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator and the Archetype Icons are
    registered trademarks or trademarks of Carol S. Pearson and Hugh K. Marr.
    Copyright 2002, 2007 Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc.
    If the Sage is active in your life, you assume that "the truth will set you free."
    At your best (now or when you fulfill your potential), you are not only knowledgeable but wise. You are wonderfully
    curious and love to think things through, striving as much as possible to filter out your own biases, to be as
    objective and fair as possible. You are motivated by a genuine hunger for truth and take a long-range perspective
    that prevents you from getting bogged down in petty squabbles and problems. You also see patterns in apparently
    discrepant events; you spot the error of logic or reasoning and practice paradigm vigilance, knowing how easy it is
    to be trapped by habits of mind or even accepted ways of thinking things through. You excel at evaluating the
    merits of relative truths and commit to people and ideas even in the face of the realization that it is impossible to
    know anything for sure. You also have a gift for staying calm and unruffled.
    When problems arise, you typically research how others have addressed them before. Then you seek out the best
    process possible for thinking the issue through, finding an answer, and taking action to solve the problem. Finally
    you try to track and evaluate the results.
    You tend to notice methodological flaws and to be rather slow to respond to situations unless they are urgent,
    because you see clearly how dangerous it is when people take action before they know what they are doing. By
    nature, you love ideas and the process of thinking, so you gravitate more toward the life of the mind than to doing
    or experiencing. As a consequence, you may filter out your gut or kinesthetic wisdom and facts that are not
    intellectually interesting.
    You may want to be on guard against the Sage's tendency to be dogmatic and opinionated, with an ivory tower
    disdain for ordinary life and affairs. Their keen ability to see the flaws in opinions and practices can take a negative
    or cynical turn, as they sit on the outside criticizing the efforts of others. They also can retreat to their heads, so
    they fail to act on what they know. Their emotions may take them over so that they act in petty ways, masked by
    high-sounding principles and rhetoric.
    You like and live stories that begin with some fact or event that is curious and unexplained. Then the scholar,
    sleuth, or wisdom figure in you undertakes a process of laboriously discovering the truth. For these reasons, you
    may relate to academic writings, mystery stories, biographies or histories that are tales of discoveries (e.g.,
    Sherlock Holmes or The Name of the Rose). Identifying as an expert, you also keep up with the literature in the fields
    that interest you or in which you are knowledgeable. You also may relate to stories in which the Sage as teacher has
    an impact through advising, mentoring, or teaching the next generation. (Narratives about heroes almost always
    contain a guide or seer, someone like you, who makes all the difference.)
    As a leader, you are (or could be) excellent at dispassionate analysis, planning, evaluation, and making wellplanned
    decisions. When others are panicking, you can detach, see the big picture, or take the long view and know
    what to do. You have a calming influence, and under your leadership events move forward at a measured, sane
    pace, so that you know that the right thing is being done in the right way.
    You like to be seen as intelligent and perceptive, so you avoid revealing any areas of ignorance.
    Others may admire your intelligence and expertise, or they can see you as nit-picky, living in an ivory tower, and
    irrelevant. They may seek you out as an advisor or enjoy trying to catch you in a mistake.
    You may (or do) benefit from:
    Avoiding dogmatism and staying open to new information, even if it contradicts what you have thought
    previously
    Paying attention to what works in the real world, rather than what simply delights the mind by its complexity
    Communicating simply rather than showing off your genius
    Staying in touch with gut or body knowledge
    Balancing the virtues of the Sage with those of the Jester
    PMAI, Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator and the Archetype Icons are
    registered trademarks or trademarks of Carol S. Pearson and Hugh K. Marr.
    Copyright 2002, 2007 Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc.
    If the Jester is active in your life, you assume that life is meant to be enjoyed.
    At your best (now or when you fulfill your potential), you are happy, playful, funny, and fun to be around. In fact,
    you bring out the joy in life for everyone around you, showing others how to "be here now," to be playful and
    inventive, to enjoy the gift of living, even in stressful or difficult times. When everyone else is going crazy with fear
    and anxiety about how much change is going on in the world, instead of feeling anxious, you experience a rush of
    excitement. Instead of getting white-knuckled, you cry "Whee!" Like court Jesters and wise fools everywhere, you
    have a deep wisdom and use humor to say things with impunity that others might not want to hear. Implicitly
    politically incorrect, you are irreverent and apparently unconcerned with what others think, but really know how to
    share what you think in ways that provoke laughter, not outrage. In fact, you find nothing more satisfying than
    making others laugh.
    When problems arise, you think outside the box. Having a trickster side, you know how to maneuver so that others
    help you out, like Tom Sawyer getting friends to paint his fence or Brer Rabbit or Coyote talking their way out of
    difficulties. By nature, you also look for ways to enjoy the process of dealing with the issue—even if all you do is
    order pizzas so you (and others) can work through the night.
    You tend to notice chances for fun in almost any situation, clever ways to get around obstacles, and the absurdities
    of life, which eventually become the basis of funny stories. Like a kid in a candy store, you are drawn to new
    experiences, the more the merrier. You may be a bit oblivious to the seriousness of situations or how seriously
    others are taking them.
    You may want to be on guard against the Jester's tendency to be irresponsible, to give into debauchery (it is fun to
    party!), or to play tricks or make cracks that really hurt people—or at least hurt their feelings. You may also fail to
    take yourself seriously enough to fulfill your own dreams.
    You like and live stories that are playful and fun. A natural clown, you enjoy stories that are light, humorous, and
    perhaps satirical. Even with very serious or upsetting material, you prefer approaches that emphasize the absurd
    (as in, say, the novels of Kurt Vonnegut). You also may relate to stories where a character succeeds through trickery
    or where people are psychologically or physically freed up by the antics of some lovable clown. Thus, you see
    yourself as helping to free people from their illusions, depression, and a limited view of life's possibilities.
    As a leader, you may find that others look to you, especially for solving contradictions and problems in the current
    system/regime. However, you may not be comfortable in thinking of yourself as a leader, and the acceptance of
    leadership is likely to be an important area of growth. Without this acceptance, you may eschew not only the
    trappings but also the responsibility of leadership, leaving your followers feeling startled and even abandoned.
    You want to be seen as a fun person, so you try not to do or say anything that makes you seem boring or a drag
    on others. This means that you may clown your way through difficult times, making it difficult for others to be there
    for you.
    Others may appreciate your humor and enjoy being around you. They also may wish you would stop fooling
    around, settle down, be serious, and get a life.
    You may (or do) benefit from:
    Being certain to fulfill your responsibilities, even if they are boring
    Finding fun ways to do work that might seem routine or dull
    Remembering to have empathy for how others may experience your jokes
    Taking time to clarify your values and protect what and who are really precious to you
    Practicing moderation and common sense
    Balancing the virtues of the Jester with those of the Sage
    PMAI, Pearson-Marr Archetype Indicator and the Archetype Icons are
    registered trademarks or trademarks of Carol S. Pearson and Hugh K. Marr.
    Copyright 2002, 2007 Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc.
    Your Shadow Archetype
    This is the archetype for which you scored the lowest and it represents qualities that you may have repressed. This
    archetype also provides potential energy for you to use and also may influence your unconscious behaviors.
    If the Orphan is active in your life, you assume that it pays to be careful.
    At your best (now or when you fulfill your potential), you demonstrate the resilience to survive life's tragedies and
    disappointments, a deep egalitarian belief in the dignity of ordinary people, a hard-boiled realism that does not
    need to sugarcoat life, and a deep empathy for others, especially those in need. You may also make effective use
    of self-help, twelve-step groups, or friendship networks; and you may band together with others to advocate for
    those who are weak, hurting, poor, or otherwise in trouble.
    When problems arise (which they always do), you may have a tendency to feel like "here we go again." This can
    either trigger a sense of despair or, conversely, boost your confidence in your ability to weather hard times. You
    tend to articulate the problem clearly (bear witness), emphasizing how serious it can be if not addressed, and work
    (alone or with others) to get the attention of those who can fix it. Recognizing that not all problems can be solved,
    you also try to help people support one another to cope with intractable issues that will not go away.
    You tend to notice and anticipate difficulties so that you can head them off, serving as the squeaky wheel that gets
    attention to a problem. With people, you are careful to discern their character before placing any trust in them, and
    you have an acute awareness that whatever can go wrong will. You may fail to notice opportunities, especially if they
    come from unexpected sources or in unanticipated ways.
    You may want to be on guard against the tendency to be fatalistic, cynical, or fearful of trusting again because
    Orphans have been let down many times. In fact, the worse things get, the less likely you are to trust others and
    get the help and support you need. Often you hunker down, protect your turf, and let others cope as best they can.
    As an Orphan you can excuse your own hurtful actions because "everyone does it," "the person deserved it," "it was
    really the other person's fault"; or you can use the bad things that have happened to you as an excuse for
    inappropriate behavior.
    You like and live stories that begin with trauma, betrayal, or victimization, in which a person learns the skills and
    perspectives that allow him/her to overcome adversity or survive difficulties. You also may be attracted to rather
    fatalistic or cynical stories, as well as stories where the dispossessed help one another (e.g., Braveheart, Looking for
    Mr. Goodbar, or Easy Rider).
    As a leader, you are (or could be) realistic about what can be accomplished, you do not promise what you cannot
    deliver, and you are good at identifying problems and addressing them. You are empathic with people in difficulty
    but not likely to let them use excuses to get away with not doing what they are supposed to do.
    You want to be seen as realistic, tough, and resilient, and you want to avoid seeming naïve or like a potential patsy
    or victim.
    Others may appreciate your tough-minded realism, your self-deprecating or sometimes cynical humor (think
    Dilbert cartoons), and your resilience. While others may sympathize with the difficulties you have gone through,
    they also may be put off by what to them seems like chronic whining, complaining, or negativity. Some may try to
    rescue you while others may identify you as a target for victimization.
    You may (or do) benefit from:
    Avoiding settling for too little; instead setting your sights higher, being willing to excel
    Collaborating with others for self-help or for economic or political advantage
    Disconnecting responsibility from blame, so that you can take responsibility for your life without blaming
    yourself or others when things go wrong
    Learning what part your own behavior might play in your difficulties and making indicated changes
    Balancing the Orphan's virtues with those of the Innocent
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    And also this silly quiz: http://helloquizzy.okcupid.com/tests...archetype-test

    You are the Seeker.

    58% Innocent, 38% Orphan, 50% Warrior, 54% Caregiver, 71% Seeker, 54% Lover, 58% Destroyer, 50% Creator, 60% Magician, 46% Ruler, 50% Sage and 58% Fool!

    Goal: Search for better life

    Fear: Conformity

    Response to Dragon/Problem: Flee from it

    Task: Be true to deeper self

    Gift: Autonomy, ambition

    Addictions: Independence, perfection

    The Seeker seeks to find a better future or found a more perfect world. Seekers often feel confined and are therefore vulnerable to the call of the unknown. Wandering begins with rather aimless experimentation. Often, this experimentation alienates those around the Seeker and the Seeker is forced to give up his/her conventional life to wander and grow. Eventually, the Seeker finds h/er Grail and can create a new life of convention.



    Shadow Seeker

    The Shadow Seekers manifests itself as an obsessive need to be independent that keeps us isolated and alone. Other times, the urge to seek will take destructive forms such as chemical addiction, or even to dangerous situations that produce adrenalin. Seeking is often dangerous. In a materialistic, secular society, the mountain to be scaled is often professional or vocational. Initially, channeling the urge to ascend into various kinds of achievement is very positive and healthy. Therefore, modern Seekers often find themselves seeking a high through their work, working an ever increasing amount of time to satisfy her/his needs.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Symbolic Herald Vasilisa's Avatar
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    Ooh thats interesting, I didn't notice that there was so much behind this personality test. I admit it appeals to me
    the formless thing which gives things form!
    Found Forum Haiku Project


    Positive Spin | your feedback welcomed | Darker Criticism

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    Creator

    54% Innocent, 50% Orphan, 67% Warrior, 38% Caregiver, 71% Seeker, 71% Lover, 75% Destroyer, 79% Creator, 72% Magician, 50% Ruler, 54% Sage and 63% Fool!


    Goal: Identity

    Fear: Inauthenticity

    Response to Dragon/Problem: Claim it as part of the self

    Task: self-creation, self-acceptance

    Gift: Individuality, vocation

    Addictions: Work, creativity



    The Creator is the center of improvement, always striving to create and better her/his surroundings. The Soul is the center of the Creator’s dance, and it seeks to find a deeper sense of self and wisdom even at the price of the Ego’s functions of keeping us healthy and functioning. The Soul is the source of our freewill, and the healthy creator can tap into the potential, creating circumstances while others feel acted upon by her/his actions.

    The Creator is driven to be authentic despite the costs. Creators are threatening to Warriors and Seekers, who are very concerned with how things are ‘supposed’ to be.

    Shadow Creator:

    The Shadow creator creates without any sense of responsibility for what s/he is making. The Shadow Creator often will deny his/her responsibility in events. Most often, the Creator is shunned by the community, and a Shadow Creator seeks to create to disturb the community from which s/he is shunned. If a creation comes out badly, a Shadow Creator will blame circumstances.

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    Oh shite. You're a threat to my seekerness.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilisa View Post
    Ooh thats interesting, I didn't notice that there was so much behind this personality test. I admit it appeals to me
    awesome! thanks for the link.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    Quote Originally Posted by IndyAnnaJoan View Post
    Oh shite. You're a threat to my seekerness.
    Haha ...sorry. But Creator sounds very ENFP. I also looked at Destroyer, my second highest, and that does sound like a certain aspect of my personality, though not my default mode or what I consider enjoyable.

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    Yes, it does sound very ENFP.

    I think seeker sounds kind of 4w5....

    Just read this description for seeker:
    SEEKER
    Feel Like: Energizing; freedom; alone but not lonely; trying something new; adventurous; outrageous; I want to learn more about the world, people, myself and how we connect/relate; endless root-lessness; never ending; I am not finished, there’s so much more to do; when I find it, I will complete it and move on---; being on an adventure, unbridled curiosity
    Motivates Me: Entering the unknown; being the first to explore; potential of discovery; the fact that possibilities yield success; learning; thriving ; guest for growth and self-actualization; perpetual learning; continual learning; experiencing new ideas; what I might find!; that it never ends……..; finding novelty
    Look/Sound Like: Dramatic, solitary, open, Bromberg song, “Top of the Slide”; something different or unexpected; let me read this book, take this class, attend this workshop etc…; being energized vs. being jaded; worn out; energy; the only thing that can stop me is death; I’d love to learn more about…..; let’s try it!
    for creator:
    CREATOR
    Feel Like: Complete elation; everything clicking; the best; energizing; imagining the possibilities (all of them); fulfilling; I can’t turn the ideas off; a rush, a high, nonstop ideas; high energy, excitement; all things are possible!; in the zone (in flow); start with a blank sheet of paper; let me picture it in my mind to get a design; too many ideas-too little time; energetic; time disappears; deep breaths; concentration; constant thinking of new ideas; excitement; creativity; hope; flow-totally in the moment; purposeful; like I’ve made a difference; “popcorn thoughts”; effortless/frustration/inspiration; smart; powerful; energy; in sync; enlighten; birth; easy; peaceful; connected to ideas; in the zone; to make a difference; exquisite sensitivity or “antennae”; stimulating; exciting; joyful; breathless; the ah-ha; sense of flow—out of body experience
    Motivates Me: Getting it out; communicating; new ideas/realities; endless opportunities; open flow; freedom; sharing “me” and my thoughts/ideas/energy; connecting pieces to create a clear consistent whole; solving a problem; pulling ideas, people, “raw material” together and creating something; cool great new; changing chaos to order and pattern, creating pictures; give birth to something new; something new replacing something old; new possibilities; deep energy; the new; cool ideas; procrastination; finding an answer to a challenge; the joy of producing what does not exist; to make a difference; new ways to look at thing differently; to help people; honor self; actualizing the vision; actualizing the purpose; new ways; stream line better; be unique; possibilities; potential; self-expression; connecting things; other archetypes; maximizing creativity in other ways; Rx/ validation—validating others; to work hard; be free
    Look/Sound Like: My best ideas made tangible; original; unique; fresh; new; energized; contribution; making things better; just doing it and making it happen; pressured speech and lots of gesturing as I try to get all of the ideas out; let me make it work in my mind; total focus, headache after-wards; a tumble of ideas—four sentences at once trying to get out; pulling things together from the inside; making something happen that never happened before; “why not?; what do you mean “it can’t be done?!?”; charged up-energetic vs. laziness; I’m in another world; hard to communicate with; interrupt me; lots of talking; brainstorming; painless birth; art/visual; a hum; fun; light bulb over head; bright eyes/exciting voice; enthusiasm; needs to be tested; what is reaction to new idea/creation; isn’t this interesting?; sparkly-triumphant; expression of love; beautiful
    both found at http://www.typetalk.com/Articles/Cla...-Archetype.pdf
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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