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View Poll Results: How intelligent do you think you are?

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  • NF - above average intelligence

    20 28.17%
  • NF - average intelligence

    7 9.86%
  • NF - below average intelligence

    1 1.41%
  • SJ - above average intelligence

    2 2.82%
  • SJ - average intelligence

    0 0%
  • SJ - below average intelligence

    1 1.41%
  • SP - above average intelligence

    4 5.63%
  • SP - average intelligence

    1 1.41%
  • SP - below average intelligence

    0 0%
  • NT - above average intelligence

    30 42.25%
  • NT - average intelligence

    4 5.63%
  • NT - below average intelligence

    1 1.41%
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Results 21 to 30 of 78

  1. #21
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    Ya, we'll have to raise the measuring limit for average, only problem then will be alot of people who are flieing in the clouds now will then have their feet on the ground; that could be worse for us if they are confronted with so much reality at once
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  2. #22
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    i think it's hard to rate intelligence as there are many different types of intelligence.

    you have people that a book smarts, excel in school, and yet air headed and dim witted.
    (one of my short lived ex's was great in science, but a complete dunce otherwise. i always considered him a lost and unaware soul.)

    you have people whom are well aware of their selves, of others, and of where they fit into the world... (a wise soul, basically) but may lack factual knowledge.


    The Nine Types of Intelligence

    By Howard Gardner



    1. Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”)



    Designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef. It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like.



    2. Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”)



    Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves. They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss.





    3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart)



    Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns. Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives. Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships. They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.


    4. Existential Intelligence



    Sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.



    5. Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”)



    Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others. It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives. Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.



    6. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”)



    Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union. Athletes, dancers, surgeons, and craftspeople exhibit well-developed bodily kinesthetic intelligence.



    7. Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart)



    Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. Linguistic intelligence allows us to understand the order and meaning of words and to apply meta-linguistic skills to reflect on our use of language. Linguistic intelligence is the most widely shared human competence and is evident in poets, novelists, journalists, and effective public speakers. Young adults with this kind of intelligence enjoy writing, reading, telling stories or doing crossword puzzles.



    8. Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”)



    Intra-personal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and one’s thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directioning one’s life. Intra-personal intelligence involves not only an appreciation of the self, but also of the human condition. It is evident in psychologist, spiritual leaders, and philosophers. These young adults may be shy. They are very aware of their own feelings and are self-motivated.



    9. Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”)



    Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. Sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects all exhibit spatial intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence may be fascinated with mazes or jigsaw puzzles, or spend free time drawing or daydreaming.
    me, personally, on an online IQ... i got above average. 122. in comparison to other college students i rank about average. i'm horrible with recalling facts in the long term and suck at things like trivia (which my best friend is quite fond of) however, most would consider me an intelligent person. i'm insightful, aware of myself, aware of others, aware of the world... i typically do well on spatial reasoning test. when information is given to me, i'm able to apply it. though i am a feeler, i'm capable of reasoning and using logic. when i really apply myself, i can write great essays and really break down a poem or a book. if you ask me about physics or math questions, or a detailed account of something that happened in history, i'll break down right in front of you and feel like a total dunce.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

  3. #23
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    If intelligence is defined as tested IQ, I'm above average. If EQ is considered a larger component of intelligence, I suck.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Mephistopheles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    If intelligence is defined as tested IQ, I'm above average. If EQ is considered a larger component of intelligence, I suck.
    Yeah, same here. To be precise, if I may use the system of Howard Gardner(posted by IndyAnnaJoan), I suck at 1,2,5,7 and 8, while I'm quite good at the rest.
    They say I only think in form of crunching numbers.....
    -Fall Out Boy

  5. #25
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    According to the Cattell scale, I'm above average IQ--wise, but in my field of research I'm definitely of average intelligence globally at best
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

    appreciates being appreciated, conflicted over conflicts, afraid of being afraid, bad at being bad, predictably unpredictable, consistently inconsistent, remarkably unremarkable...

    I may not agree with what you are feeling, but I will defend to death your right to have a good cry over it

    The whole problem with the world is that fools & fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell

  6. #26
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    These threads always seem to generate a lot of false modesty in the hope that it will somehow inspire an inverse relationship to whatever trait-of-the-moment we're self-diagnosing. Fact is, talk is cheap. Anyone can be anything they want to be online. There are no controls, save what the individual offers as fact.

    Intelligence, as a term, is too vague a concept to comment on. Still, it's likely I am very intelligent. Smarter than most; less intelligent than some.

    That's good enough for me.

  7. #27
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
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    lol I'm not sure how much this poll could tell you. I think it's obvious that the people here in typeC do in fact have above average intelligence, so is it a sign of confidence/grandeur or simply an accurate portrayal of the average intelligence when people here think they're smart? I always test 120 or higher in IQ tests, so I guess I'm above average. For what its worth, there was a national IQ test thing that took here in NZ during my teens. That wasn't all that good for me, but I insist that was because it involved a lot of local kiwi knowledge and slang. I've only been in NZ for maybe 2 years at that point, so I felt ripped off. I also had one of those IQ tests which split you up into different cognitive capacities and measure you in a piecemeal fashion. My results were mostly average, but 2 stood out. There was a section on making connections, for example, the tester would ask me what are the similarities between a hat and a glove, with varying difficulties. I got every question correct on that section, I suspect now that it was because of me Ne. The memory section however... oof. Marginal.
    Chimera of Filth

    A gruesome beast with dripping flesh
    Clings to me as a sick fixture
    My throbbing heart it gnawed apart
    It stalks and hunts me through mirrors

  8. #28
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    Online IQ tests put me in Mensa status(IQ of 145-165), I dont know enough about everything though to think that I am highly intelligent. My Se pull is to strong and limits me with the amount of time I put into understanding, and figuring things out.

  9. #29
    libtard SJW chickpea's Avatar
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    i've taken two legit iq tests, one when i was 4 and one when i was 13 or 14. i got 157 when i was four and i think 130 the second time. so if that trend has continued i'm probably average now. that kind of intelligence seems so useless outside of school though. it hasn't gotten me anywhere.

  10. #30
    Senior Member guesswho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    If intelligence is defined as tested IQ, I'm above average. If EQ is considered a larger component of intelligence, I suck.
    I think there are intelligences types which exclude one another. For instance, the logical-mathematical intelligence and the emotional IQ. I don't think many people have them both very developed. Just one of them. Of course... I could be wrong : ) But you don't see many math geeks with high EQs, it's very confusing, because being highly intelligent, would likely make you highly unintelligent in some fields, at least that's what I saw in very smart people.
    I've also seen people who have a very high EQ, very social, and they deal very good with life's small challenges, they don't really have a high IQ, and I've seen people with high IQs who can't handle the shit of life, not fitting in etc. My conclusion is that a high IQ with a low EQ will fuck you up. Smart and misanthropic. Of course these are the extremes...who knows these things.....

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