User Tag List

First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 106

  1. #51
    my floof is luxury Wind Up Rex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    853 sx/sp
    Posts
    4,981

    Default

    There's power in words. Perhaps more than we care to remember. I recall when I was still living in the dorms at college my RA decided to post the meaning of the names of each of her residence on their front door, and I was struck by how--without necessarily knowing those meanings--how well each well one suited their owner.

    My name is from the Greek for "defender of mankind". How to protect those closest to me, how to be strong and how to serve and provide for those weaker than myself have always been the existential concerns of my life. I was named for rulers and generals, and I have always striven to live up to that.

    I wonder whether when meaning is uncovered, it provides a certain slant to what we already know. Or if there's power in the act of naming in and of itself. I've heard it said that we process emotion in our native language. It makes me wonder if someone somewhere in China is feeling something I've never experienced for the simple fact that person is of a culture that felt that particular sentiment was compelling enough to be codified in some way that mine has not. And if so, does the lack of codification mean that I'm incapable of experiencing that sentiment, or is it simply one that occurs in a blind spot? Mislabled and therefore missed altogether.

    So it goes with names. If my name honored life itself as my sister's does, then would I be more vivacious? Or would my vivaciousness simply be more outstanding? Having become a name I don't know myself otherwise, and frankly (and this may be more to the point) such that I am don't necessarily care.
    And so long as you haven’t experienced this: to die and so to grow,
    you are only a troubled guest on the dark earth

  2. #52
    A Gentle Whisper ~MS*ANGEL~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/so
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    1,518

    Default

    My name could not have been a more appropriate match for my personality, those who know me well say. Sneha.

    I used to hate the name I was given at birth, though. I remember now how we were once taught at Chinmaya Mission that sneha means 'conditional love', and that it's the lower kind of love. Since that day, I had felt bad about being called something that had such a negative connotation to it.

    But now I've come to appreciate that name. It feels nice now when someone I care about calls me by my given name, because 1) it makes me feel a little more connected to my culture, and 2) no matter what 'form' of love it signifies, it still means 'love'.
    Only she who attempts the absurd can achieve the impossible... and then some.

    MY BLOGS: https://freestylelines.blogspot.com/, https://tfthdiary.blogspot.com/
    TWITTER: https://twitter.com/angel_ss1
    TUMBLR: http://angelight1.tumblr.com/


  3. #53
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Socionics
    ILI
    Posts
    1,838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wind Up Rex View Post
    There's power in words. Perhaps more than we care to remember. I recall when I was still living in the dorms at college my RA decided to post the meaning of the names of each of her residence on their front door, and I was struck by how--without necessarily knowing those meanings--how well each well one suited their owner.

    My name is from the Greek for "defender of mankind". How to protect those closest to me, how to be strong and how to serve and provide for those weaker than myself have always been the existential concerns of my life. I was named for rulers and generals, and I have always striven to live up to that.

    I wonder whether when meaning is uncovered, it provides a certain slant to what we already know. Or if there's power in the act of naming in and of itself. I've heard it said that we process emotion in our native language. It makes me wonder if someone somewhere in China is feeling something I've never experienced for the simple fact that person is of a culture that felt that particular sentiment was compelling enough to be codified in some way that mine has not. And if so, does the lack of codification mean that I'm incapable of experiencing that sentiment, or is it simply one that occurs in a blind spot? Mislabled and therefore missed altogether.

    So it goes with names. If my name honored life itself as my sister's does, then would I be more vivacious? Or would my vivaciousness simply be more outstanding? Having become a name I don't know myself otherwise, and frankly (and this may be more to the point) such that I am don't necessarily care.
    Hello, name-sharer.

    Interesting how our name is interpreted as conqueror, vanquisher, and defender at the same time, and I find that to be highly representative of those who bear it as well.

  4. #54
    LadyLazarus
    Guest

    Default

    I feel like my name may have played a hand in why I was/sort of still am painfully shy, being that it's weird and therefore was the subject of many a ridicule. I remember being very ashamed of it as a kid, it kind of made me a target for bullying, now I'm fine with it for the most part, although I do go by my nickname most often nowadays; Mei, which is the end part of my name.It made me want to hide, and become very timid during my younger years. Inside I wasn't as unassertive as I came off at first glance, but I acted that way because the embarrassment was almost unbearable and incredibly crippling.My full name is a misspelled/ variation of the Japanese word for "dream", which I've always thought was stupid and hippy-dippy .I'm honestly not even remotely significantly Japanese enough(I'm like 1/100th or something) to have a Japanese name in my opinion.The only thing I like about my name now is that it's extremely uncommon, I may be the only person in the country(dare I say world?)with my name, which I love.

  5. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    Hm. I have a rather 'ordinary' name. It was given to me for no other reason than that my mother liked the sound if it. It's common and unremarkable. I share it with a great many other people. I don't really give it much thought. I'm happy my name is simple enough that it doesn't get butchered by other anglophones.

  6. #56
    my floof is luxury Wind Up Rex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    853 sx/sp
    Posts
    4,981

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alea_iacta_est View Post

    Interesting how our name is interpreted as conqueror, vanquisher, and defender at the same time, and I find that to be highly representative of those who bear it as well.
    What can I say? Heavy is the head that wears the Alex.
    And so long as you haven’t experienced this: to die and so to grow,
    you are only a troubled guest on the dark earth

  7. #57
    Sweet Ocean Cloud SD45T-2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 so/sp
    Posts
    2,761

    Default

    1w2-6w5-3w2 so/sp

    "I took one those personality tests. It came back negative." - Dan Mintz

  8. #58
    I could do things Hard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 sp/so
    Socionics
    EIE Fe
    Posts
    7,988

    Default

    My name in some ways makes me feel a little pretentious. When I was young, combined with my mothers "you're super special!" barrage at me, it didn't help with it. My real name is Pieter (I don't really mind sharing it too much). Every time I have to say for someone to write down I have to say "but it's spelled different". I get people that say "pie-eater", "Pee-ater", and many different variations. It's pronounced exactly the same as Peter. It's just the dutch spelling of the name (since I am 1/4th dutch ancestry). Combined with my middle name, and last name (both of which are about as German as you can get), my name stands out a good chunk. I do like that my name is unique though, but not in an overt way.
    MBTI: ExxJ tetramer
    Functions: Fe > Te > Ni > Se > Si > Ti > Fi > Ne
    Enneagram: 1w2 - 3w4 - 6w5 (The Taskmaster) | sp/so
    Socionics: β-E dimer | -
    Big 5: slOaI
    Temperament: Choleric/Melancholic
    Alignment: Lawful Neutral
    External Perception: Nohari and Johari


  9. #59
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INtp
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    5,091

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    Hm. I have a rather 'ordinary' name. It was given to me for no other reason than that my mother liked the sound if it. It's common and unremarkable. I share it with a great many other people. I don't really give it much thought. I'm happy my name is simple enough that it doesn't get butchered by other anglophones.
    Same here.

    The only thing I don't like about my name is that it's too common. Someone calls my name at work, in the store, on the street, etc. and I think they are calling for me but really it's for someone else. Happens all the time.
    INtp
    5w6 or 9w1 sp/so/sx, I think
    Ravenclaw/Hufflepuff
    Neutral Good
    LII-Ne




  10. #60
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    2,591

    Default

    I really always loved my name. I did have a stretch in my younger days when I wanted a name more aligned with my surroundings, but I got over that. My first name isn't all that unique, but it's uncommon in my community, and it catches people by surprise sometimes when the match my name and face. It makes for good conversation starter.

Similar Threads

  1. [JCF] How Does Your Inferior Function Affect Your Thinking?
    By Mal12345 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-26-2014, 06:44 PM
  2. How does Bipolar disorder affect personality type?
    By Tyrinth in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-14-2012, 09:18 PM
  3. How does your mind work when reading?
    By Saslou in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 07-16-2011, 07:06 PM
  4. How does your mind work?
    By Queen Kat in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 10-25-2009, 10:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO