User Tag List

First 12

Results 11 to 18 of 18

  1. #11
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    I agree with what Redbone said.

    Also, rituals are comforting. They can provide us with a sense of normality so that the curve of change isn't so overwhelming. One of the ways to come out of an anxiety attack is to perform a familiar ritual like brushing one's teeth.

    We also need to remember our history. Tradition and ritual give us a link of continuity to remind us from where we came. People who forget history are doomed to repeat it, et al.

  2. #12
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    I'm going to try to take some of what I said into the abstract and say that I don't think rituals really have anything to do with a larger sense of tradition. They can and they can't. A bunch of gangsters pouring out 40s for their dead homies are also commited to ritual. Or maybe it's some private act.. I was listening to an interview with a local novelist recently, and while she wasn't a poet, she said she'd read poems every morning before she got to working. Partly as a way to get her own creative juices flowing, but she started going into how it was sort of a sacred act for her.

  3. #13
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,536

    Cool Creative Ritual

    I rather like rituals. And I like to create my own rituals.

    As a boy I rather enjoyed the answering chants in church, and so I have created an answering chant on Central.

    First we bring up, "Wind in the Willows", onto our screen. Then on Skype we read it to one another. And we read it to one another in the form of an answering chant.

    So first you chant a paragraph, then I chant the next paragraph in reply.

    It's best to think of this answering chant as taking us deeper into the meditative state.

    We start to relax. We let the story occupy our cognitive mind, and allow our meditative mind to come awake.

    Of course in the meditative state we are suggestible. But I can't think of anymore delightful suggestions than those found in, "Wind in the Willows".

  4. #14
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default The Wind of the Willows and Spring Cleaning Rituals

    "The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring- cleaning his little home. First with brooms, then with dusters; then on ladders and steps and chairs, with a brush and a pail of whitewash; till he had dust in his throat and eyes, and splashes of whitewash all over his black fur, and an aching back and weary arms. Spring was moving in the air above and in the earth below and around him, penetrating even his dark and lowly little house with its spirit of divine discontent and longing. It was small wonder, then, that he suddenly flung down his brush on the floor, said `Bother!' and `O blow!' and also `Hang spring-cleaning!' and bolted out of the house without even waiting to put on his coat. Something up above was calling him imperiously, and he made for the steep little tunnel which answered in his case to the gravelled carriage-drive owned by animals whose residences are nearer to the sun and air. So he scraped and scratched and scrabbled and scrooged and then he scrooged again and scrabbled and scratched and scraped, working busily with his little paws and muttering to himself, `Up we go! Up we go!' till at last, pop! his snout came out into the sunlight, and he found himself rolling in the warm grass of a great meadow."

  5. #15
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,536

    Default

    Meditation is simple. All we do is repeat something over and over again to occupy the cognitive mind, and then the meditative mind comes awake.

    It's a bit like repeating a word over and over again, and after a while it loses its meaning. In the same way, if we repeat something over and over again it loses its meaning in our cognitive mind, leaving plenty of room for the meditative mind to come out to play.

    And in the meditative state we are suggestible, so it is important to decide with our cognitive mind, before we enter the meditative state, what suggestions we will make to ourselves.

    And it seems to me that the suggestions contained in, "Wind in the Willows", are ideal.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4
    Socionics
    INFp
    Posts
    3,403

    Default

    Intense. Thanks for the interesting discussion.

    But why are rituals and traditions seen as an ideal way of transmitting learning?

    I mean if there was a sudden change and a person lost a steady job or lost faith in their faith or something wouldn't having rituals and traditions become like a crisis because their whole identity revolved around those rituals and traditions. So much so that the self was forgotten and when something happened there was a lack of coping to deal with what was going on. Well hypothetically wouldn't it be grounding to be able to have possibilities than be limited by the rituals and traditions that are there.

    I mean yeah it is helpful to have rituals for a depressed and anxious people to get out of a loop too, to have a sense of normal in their life, structure but then there are opposites to that angle too I suppose.

    There is certainly a difference to doing something in a ritual manner and traditional manner. I see ritual as a repetition or trance and tradition as something established and that feels safe and comforting on the surface. You learn through ritual of repetition as a habit and then there are traditions like holidays that are cultural.

  7. #17
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,536

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    But why are rituals and traditions seen as an ideal way of transmitting learning?
    Because they bypass the critical mind.

    Children, for instance, have yet to develop a critical mind so they are very suitable for learning by rituals and traditions.

    In fact of the more than six billion souls alive today, almost all of them learnt their language, culture and religion as children, before their critical mind had time to develop.

  8. #18
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,536

    Smile Enchantment

    Life has lost its savour. Anomie stalks the land. Now is the winter of our discontent made glorious summer by enchantment.

    Our voices are being heard as we chant to one another across the internet.

    Some follow the topic; others follow logic; while some follow their feelings as we re-enchant the world.

    Our task is simply the re-enchantment of everyday life which has been drained of meaning, drained of love and turned into the drain of the economy.

    But as we chant to one another, answering one another like the dawn chorus, we laugh along like drains in the rain, together with the laughing kookaburras.

    The drought of anomie has broken. And even the introverts have come out to play, to dance and chant in the rain, re-enchanting the land.

Similar Threads

  1. Close minded and traditional people
    By Fay in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 12-11-2013, 06:17 PM
  2. Forum culture and traditions?
    By Octarine in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 06-26-2011, 07:41 AM
  3. [SJ] SJ's and tradition.
    By Athenian200 in forum The SJ Guardhouse (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ)
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-28-2008, 11:12 AM
  4. Tradition, Modernity and Shrinking Birthrates
    By INA in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-30-2008, 02:55 PM
  5. Extroverted Judgment and Conventions/Traditions
    By proteanmix in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-15-2008, 06:53 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO