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  1. #31
    it's tea time! Walking Tourist's Avatar
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    I have auditory processing disorder.
    For me, it meant that I had difficulty with phonics. There are certain sounds that I don't perceive at all. My reading skills are visual in nature. I can recognize entire words almost as if they were word pictures. When they are broken apart into sounds, they become meaningless to me.
    Also, I can't do the thing that is called "selective listening." If I am in a noisy place with multiple conversations, I cannot tune out the background noise to listen to the person who is speaking to me. It all sounds as if it is at the same volume (excessively loud).
    Although I sometimes seem as if I have hearing loss, that is not true. My hearing is better than normal. I just can't filter out anything at all so I respond to everything or I get a monster sized headache and have to get away before I start responding like a wild animal!
    Oddly enough, however, my auditory processing problems have not affected whatever part of the brain is responsible for understanding music. I have had dreams in four-part harmony and my thoughts are frequently musical. If school had been sung, I would have been a very happy camper.
    As for brain dominance, I don't know what all of this means. I am not a visual thinker. I think in melody and harmony and rhythm. But I learn with the help of music and art!

    Quote Originally Posted by GemPOPGem View Post

    I can offer nothing on auditory processing differences, i do know though that it can affect dyslexic individuals too, and it does sound partly similar in description. I rather suspect that you have done the best for her also. I do wonder if having this alone would also affect brain dominance, and think that a multisensory approach would be helpful. Did she have any specilaist programs to help?
    I'm a little teapot, short and stout. Here is my handle and here is my spout. Every time I steam up, I give a shout. Just tip me over and pour me out.

  2. #32
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    From what little i know the wilson program is not too bad, it has a strong emphasis on multisensory learning and visual imagination. Of course it depends on who is teaching it and how well they teach it, but it certainly sounds like you did very well for him at the time. I'd certainly chose the wilson program over jolly phonics
    .

    If they would have had it here, I would have put him through the Scottish Rite program.

    Susan Barton's program is excellent. I have looked at a lot of programs and hers is terrific.

    I'm not familiar with the Lindamood-bell lips program, was this for your daughter? It seems to have a strong emphasis on phonics (based on a quick look at their site), which always worries me with dyslexia as, for the majority of dyslexic individuals, it frustrates rather than helps their progress.
    My son did this at his school. LiPs is an excellent program (it is terribly expensive, though, through a private provider). It directly teaches phonemic awareness. For example, to someone with poor phonemic awareness, short 'i' and 'e' sound a lot alike--pen and pin. The program taught the difference between the two by showing the placement of the mouth when saying the two sounds, which is very different. They do this by having pictures of a woman with a lovely mouth saying the sound. The teachers do it and they get the kids to do it.

    Susan Barton's program had a screening video to see if a person would benefit from her reading program. If your child fails the screening (like mine did), then LiPS is the best thing for them. Mine had to go through the LiPS program and then go through a reading program.

    I can offer nothing on auditory processing differences, i do know though that it can affect dyslexic individuals too, and it does sound partly similar in description. I rather suspect that you have done the best for her also. I do wonder if having this alone would also affect brain dominance, and think that a multisensory approach would be helpful. Did she have any specilaist programs to help?
    I used Earobics and Sound Reading for her. I also just waited a little longer to teach her reading. Once she caught on to the sound/symbol relationship, she went through several reading levels--from late pre-K to early 3rd grade--in a few months. It was hard but she was really determined to do it. She actually did better with learning to read than her brother.

    I wonder if you noted any things which seemed to indicate they had high intelligence befor reading/nursery age? For example were they unusually good at lego, puzzles, problem solving, visual memory in card games such as pairs, making things.
    Not really for my son until he got older. He has an excellent and extremely sharp wit. I know that this isn't thought of as a mark of intelligence but it really is.

    My daughter showed strong and early signs of visual strengths. She learned early to play games or operate software on the computer without knowing how to read. I have a hard time explaining this but it's like she had this system of rapid trial and error when learning something.

    Even though my 3rd child didn't have any of those difficulties, he is unusually gifted. He could speak over 600 words by the time he was 18 months, play and beat his brother and sister at games before he was 2, and potty-trained himself.

    There are often signs of good visual imagination as well as the negatives which get picked up on when they start nursery or school.
    There are but sometimes they can be too subtle for parents to catch. There's a reliance on measuring verbal intelligence/expressive/receptive language to gauge intelligence in young children. If they have problems in that area, it can take a skilled tester to get a good measure of their intelligence/potential.

    Thats fantastic, where is that?
    Sent you a PM.

  3. #33
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    .

    If they would have had it here, I would have put him through the Scottish Rite program.
    I can't seem to find anything that actually explains what the program consists of, what methods are used, so i'll refrain from commenting on this. I'm in the U.K so i'm a little naieve of all the programs available in the states. Is it available in the U.K?

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    Susan Barton's program is excellent. I have looked at a lot of programs and hers is terrific.
    Really? I'm not so sure actually, i always have a problem with programs that introduce phonics as a learning strategy for people with dyslexia. Although i am not sure of how it works exactly, i did note this on her site...
    * Phonemic Awareness is the first step. You must teach someone how to listen to a single word or syllable and break it into individual phonemes. They also have to be able to take individual sounds and blend them into a word, change sounds, delete sounds, and compare sounds -- all in their head. These skills are easiest to learn before someone brings in printed letters.

    I have a really hard time imagining how the bolded could help, since dyslexics are not suited to learning in this style (for the main), i find it very frustrating when programs offer this as a solution in a language that is so irregular at it's core.



    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    My son did this at his school. LiPs is an excellent program (it is terribly expensive, though, through a private provider). It directly teaches phonemic awareness. For example, to someone with poor phonemic awareness, short 'i' and 'e' sound a lot alike--pen and pin. The program taught the difference between the two by showing the placement of the mouth when saying the two sounds, which is very different. They do this by having pictures of a woman with a lovely mouth saying the sound. The teachers do it and they get the kids to do it.
    Unfortunately i just don't see how this would help someone with dyslexia, unless corraborated with a 3d image of each sound simultaneously.
    I do think it would be helpful to anyone with speech difficulties though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    Susan Barton's program had a screening video to see if a person would benefit from her reading program. If your child fails the screening (like mine did), then LiPS is the best thing for them. Mine had to go through the LiPS program and then go through a reading program.
    Gosh, he had to go through a lot, did he benifit greatly from these pprograms?

    I have done the Davis dyslexia program with my son, which is also nighty expensive, but i really do understand how it is working and give it a lot of credit. I don't think it's perfect but i do think it is the best program i have come across as yet.



    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    Not really for my son until he got older. He has an excellent and extremely sharp wit. I know that this isn't thought of as a mark of intelligence but it really is.
    I do believe it is a sign of intelligence, not many can boast an excellent extreamly sharp wit.


    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    My daughter showed strong and early signs of visual strengths. She learned early to play games or operate software on the computer without knowing how to read. I have a hard time explaining this but it's like she had this system of rapid trial and error when learning something.
    It's funny you should mention this, my son knows very well how to find his way around visual sites without reading any of the text because his visual skills are advanced so he will memorise icons and picture links etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    Even though my 3rd child didn't have any of those difficulties, he is unusually gifted. He could speak over 600 words by the time he was 18 months, play and beat his brother and sister at games before he was 2, and potty-trained himself.
    So he is classically gifted, in the academic, how old is he now?


    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    There are but sometimes they can be too subtle for parents to catch. There's a reliance on measuring verbal intelligence/expressive/receptive language to gauge intelligence in young children. If they have problems in that area, it can take a skilled tester to get a good measure of their intelligence/potential.
    Yes it needs to be a tester who looks for the strengths and well as the weaknesses, which can be difficult to find as most tests are inclined towards academia they do not give a true indication of intelligence.
    e.g if my son see's something, understands it, can manipulate it in his mind and make new things with it...does the fact that he can't write it down in a test make it invalid.
    Has your son ever had a full educational psychological assessment by an independant dyslexia assessor?

    It is only in my sons most recent report (at his new school) that they have recognised his intelligence and stated that he has exceptional visual skills.
    I had been fighting (his old school) for years over this, they were hell bent on forcing the idea that he achieved poorly in everything and was below average intelligence-mighty frustrating!



    I am going to a talk/lecture on monday evening by Ron Davis (the gift of dyslexia), i will post later about it, if anyone has any questions they would like me to ask, let me know.
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

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