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Thread: Inattentiveness

  1. #1
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Default Inattentiveness

    I've had fair time to observe my IxTP (n?) wife now, and I think it's safe to say her behavior falls on this category.

    I'd like to know what functional cognition theory and personality theory has to offer on this subject. I've tried to understand it on the basis of personality; I've said to myself - these Ti people don't follow what's going around them - their brain and what's happening in there is their own universe.

    Most of anything outside, it seems to me, is just for amusement. Most of all, I've said to myself - they want to follow their own pace. It seems that anything normally judged as urgent is just another thing to them, something that has equal intellectual value with ageless theorems and the end of the universe. In other words, catching a bus and contemplating the meaning of life take equal importance.

    Whom am I kidding? Pondering the meaning of life, surfing in the net and missing the bus takes greater precedence.

    So, I'll just want to know what's there, and why she (or any other INTP for that matter) can be so unable to respond to urgent situations when they arise. I know that she's content with losing almost - if not completely - all the situational opportunities if she's able to perform everything at a leisurely pace. I see Ne there, so I suspect INTP.

    So, INTP and inattentive.

    What's your take on it?

    in·at·ten·tive
    adj.
    Exhibiting a lack of attention; not attentive.
    not paying attention; heedless; negligent

    Synonyms: absent, absentminded, apathetic, blind, bored, careless, distracted, distrait, distraught, diverted, dreamy, faraway, heedless, inadvertent, indifferent, inobservant, listless, lost*, musing, neglectful, oblivious, off-guard, out to lunch, preoccupied, rapt, regardless, remiss, removed, scatterbrained, thoughtless, unconscious, undiscerning, unheeding, unmindful, unnoticing, unobservant, unobserving, unperceiving, unthinking, unwatchful, vague

    Antonyms: attentive, heedful, looking, noticing, observant
    * = informal/non-formal usage
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #2
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    I've had fair time to observe my IxTP (n?) wife now, and I think it's safe to say her behavior falls on this category.

    I'd like to know what functional cognition theory and personality theory has to offer on this subject. I've tried to understand it on the basis of personality; I've said to myself - these Ti people don't follow what's going around them - their brain and what's happening in there is their own universe.

    Most of anything outside, it seems to me, is just for amusement. Most of all, I've said to myself - they want to follow their own pace. It seems that anything normally judged as urgent is just another thing to them, something that has equal intellectual value with ageless theorems and the end of the universe. In other words, catching a bus and contemplating the meaning of life take equal importance.

    Whom am I kidding? Pondering the meaning of life, surfing in the net and missing the bus takes greater precedence.

    So, I'll just want to know what's there, and why she (or any other INTP for that matter) can be so unable to respond to urgent situations when they arise. I know that she's content with losing almost - if not completely - all the situational opportunities if she's able to perform everything at a leisurely pace. I see Ne there, so I suspect INTP.

    So, INTP and inattentive.

    What's your take on it?

    in·at·ten·tive
    adj.
    Exhibiting a lack of attention; not attentive.
    not paying attention; heedless; negligent

    Synonyms: absent, absentminded, apathetic, blind, bored, careless, distracted, distrait, distraught, diverted, dreamy, faraway, heedless, inadvertent, indifferent, inobservant, listless, lost*, musing, neglectful, oblivious, off-guard, out to lunch, preoccupied, rapt, regardless, remiss, removed, scatterbrained, thoughtless, unconscious, undiscerning, unheeding, unmindful, unnoticing, unobservant, unobserving, unperceiving, unthinking, unwatchful, vague

    Antonyms: attentive, heedful, looking, noticing, observant
    * = informal/non-formal usage
    After reading your synonym list I understand attentiveness was a thing highly valued in Hitler's Germany.

  3. #3
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    After reading your synonym list I understand attentiveness was a thing highly valued in Hitler's Germany.
    Yes, we stand to attention.

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    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    YAY now that we've made foolish comparisons between attentiveness and Hitler's Germany (WTF?), I'd like to make a serious answer.

    Although I cannot speak about INTPs, I can speak about my own experience. I'm grossly inattentive. Just today, my IXTP husband, who is highly observant btw, pointed something out to me. And I simply had not noticed either the previous way it was nor the current change.

    This kind of thing happens on a daily basis.

    Therefore, I am really wondering if it is truly a Ti thing. I think there may be some other factor involved.

  5. #5
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Yes, we stand to attention.
    When they play God save the Queen in a movie theatre in the Piccadilly.

  6. #6
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    YAY now that we've made foolish comparisons between attentiveness and Hitler's Germany (WTF?), I'd like to make a serious answer.

    Although I cannot speak about INTPs, I can speak about my own experience. I'm grossly inattentive. Just today, my IXTP husband, who is highly observant btw, pointed something out to me. And I simply had not noticed either the previous way it was nor the current change.

    This kind of thing happens on a daily basis.

    Therefore, I am really wondering if it is truly a Ti thing. I think there may be some other factor involved.
    Attentiveness was the major feature in Hitler's Germany. It was not a foolish comparison.

  7. #7
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Well, my search on the phrase "inattentiveness" revealed the name of a well-establish disorder, although however well-established, doesn't count as a real thing in my book. Should it?
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  8. #8
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    We're capable of understanding urgency, when it's truly urgent. Like, "if you don't turn in this paper to your teacher by 5pm today, she will not accept it, and you may fail the class." But a lot of times people say things are urgent, or act like they're urgent, when they're really not, in our eyes. It's simply not worth getting worked up over doing things by a certain time a lot of times. So you miss the bus. Another one comes along in 10 minutes. So you miss an exit ramp? You can just get off on the next exit and be there two minutes later. It's not the end of the world. So you didn't wash the dishes right after dinner? They will still be there after we watch the movie. Etc. It's a matter of not letting things rile you up when they're not that important.
    Something Witty

  9. #9
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    I'd like to know what functional cognition theory and personality theory has to offer on this subject. I've tried to understand it on the basis of personality; I've said to myself - these Ti people don't follow what's going around them - their brain and what's happening in there is their own universe.
    Short descriptor for these characteristics: Introversion. I'm not sure the Ti categorisation, correct or otherwise, is desparately relevant at this stage. Introverts are more aware of what is going on inside themselves than what is going on in the world outside by definition; it's part and parcel of who they are and why the categories of introversion and extraversion exist. When people have functional preferences strongly geared towards one dimension of introversion/extraversion (as opposed to skills, which can be learned by most individuals), it is extremely difficult for them to focus on the other dimension of experiencing for any length of time, and tends to drain their energy. Perhaps spending time alone and self-reflecting on ideas without external stimulation is just as difficult and draining for you as noticing external matters and attending to them in the same way as you do is for her.

    Is either preference definitively "better", or just a reflection of the person's unique personal attributes, that defines who they are and what they have to contribute to their existence?

    Most of anything outside, it seems to me, is just for amusement. Most of all, I've said to myself - they want to follow their own pace. It seems that anything normally judged as urgent is just another thing to them, something that has equal intellectual value with ageless theorems and the end of the universe. In other words, catching a bus and contemplating the meaning of life take equal importance.
    Whose definition of "normal" are we going by? Should your own preferred one take precedence? If so, why?

    Whom am I kidding? Pondering the meaning of life, surfing in the net and missing the bus takes greater precedence.
    Your grammar is now fixed.

    Now, can you figure out why I just responded as I did? Not perhaps the easiest of connections to make, I grant you, but there is a reason directly and expressly relevant to the topic.

    So, I'll just want to know what's there, and why she (or any other INTP for that matter) can be so unable to respond to urgent situations when they arise.
    Whose definition of "urgent" are you going by, yours or hers? If your personal definitions are at variance, you're misunderstanding the situation. If she's unable to respond in an appropriate manner to something she herself classifies as urgent, then there may indeed be an issue. If, however, it's simply the case that you consider something to be of utmost importance and she doesn't, as is rather strongly implied here, I would instead ask you why it's so important to you that she attunes her own beliefs to yours? You are both different people with different skills and priorities: perhaps you also have something different to offer one another.

    I know that she's content with losing almost - if not completely - all the situational opportunities if she's able to perform everything at a leisurely pace.
    What is a "situational opportunity", as defined by yourself, that it should be as important to anyone else as it appears to be to you? (This is something of a challenge to shift from your familiar and comfortable perspective.)

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    After reading your synonym list I understand attentiveness was a thing highly valued in Hitler's Germany.
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    YAY now that we've made foolish comparisons between attentiveness and Hitler's Germany (WTF?), I'd like to make a serious answer.
    Nothing foolish about it really: I agree with Wildcat on this. It's characteristic of totalitarian and authoritarian society that standards of behaviour are not allowed to develop from the exercise of individual conscience and judgment, but are imposed on the individual by an external authority, reinforced by social proscription and the fear of punishment. One is necessarily highly attentive to these externally imposed values in order to ensure that one is either fully compliant or that one's own non-compliance goes unobserved, in order to avert negative consequences to the self. Wildcat was probably just using an extreme and familiar example to make his point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Therefore, I am really wondering if it is truly a Ti thing. I think there may be some other factor involved.
    As I said earlier, it's probably mostly to do with introversion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    Well, my search on the phrase "inattentiveness" revealed the name of a well-establish disorder, although however well-established, doesn't count as a real thing in my book. Should it?
    Depends. Do you feel an urgent need to fit your wife into a pathological category; or are you prepared to accept the way she is, where that may differ from your own personal or idealised qualities, as part of her natural personality? Both are equally viable options; which one you choose to take is in the end a measure of the heirarchy of values you choose to adopt.
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  10. #10
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Attentiveness was the major feature in Hitler's Germany. It was not a foolish comparison.
    Hitler also ate sugar. Your point?
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

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