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  1. #1
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    Default Cognitive Functions of the Newborn Infant

    It seems to me, without really going into any of the research that may have been done on the subject, that a human being is never more vulnerable than the first moment that he or she comes into the world.

    So here's the question:

    What cognitive functions do you think are present and active in a newborn child? And how do these cognitive functions change and develop over time? How are certain cognitive functions preferred over others and consequently developed into specific personality types?


    If I had to guess, I would say all the cognitive functions are present and active in a newborn child. But then again, are cognitive functions even possible at this stage? Are cognitive functions only possible when consciousness is tied to memory in some way? It seems to me that in order for a child to grow and adapt as quickly as it does to the drastically new environment around them, all synapses have to be firing at full speed.

    I would love to hear what you guys think and if you know of any significant and helpful research that may have been done on the subject, particularly with regard to the relationship between cognitive functions and early infancy, and maybe even at the fetus stage - or is that not even possible?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member durentu's Avatar
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    from neuroplasticity research, from the age of 0 to 4, the brain is setting itself up in a bootstrap manner. while there are curious things, like the ability for infants to swim without training, it is largely a big meat loaf organizing itself. After that, there is a second stage of hyper learning from about 4 to 14, where learning disabilities are in high alert. From there, the BDNF gene is 'turned off' and the brain is 'set'.

    However, there are ways to reactivate this hyper learning ability, though not to that degree from 4-14 year old in advanced age that helps with senility, and alzheimer's and some cases of parkinson's.


    Cognitive functions? if it does exist at all, it's very very blurry and primal.
    "People often say that this or that person has not yet found himself. But the self is not something one finds; it is something one creates." - Thomas Szasz

  3. #3
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
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    None.

    the "cognitive functions" described in MBTI are merely self attributions/ascriptions and attitudes about the world, and seeing as a newborn hasn't identified itself yet (even toddlers don't recognize their reflections in the mirror), they can't make unifications about who they are nor about how they relate to the world. I do agree however that any of them could develop from onset.

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    OK. Well, it seems I missed Child Psychology 101, so I'll make the question more general then.

    Basically what I'm after is this:

    How much, if anything, is known or understood about the overall cognitive or psychological state of a newborn infant who has just left the womb? Other than that it is one of extreme vulnerability, if that is even true to begin with...

  5. #5
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Well, I've seen the E/I thing definitely play out almost from birth for my two biological kids. One is an introvert, one an extrovert; the extrovert was obvious from day #1 and the introvert was pretty much pegged within the first year. Babies have no filters yet to prevent their natural engagement style (fear, shame, doubt, whatever), so it's pretty raw and obvious.

    My ESFP kid spent the first two months of his life in NICU... and all the nurses literally would spend their break times holding him and visiting with him, or staying after shift, beyond their assigned duties -- because he was so responsive and engaged them so overtly and happily. He was a people magnet from the start.

    But the baby is not conscious of any of this. Babies just react/respond and/or explore. They are just however they're wired. So it's kind of difficult to label it as a framework; they're more just traits. I'm not sure what we could ever say about a cognitive/psychological framework from a child who doesn't even yet have language with which thoughts are actually formed; at that age, they just know biological instinct.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Well, I've seen the E/I thing definitely play out almost from birth for my two biological kids. One is an introvert, one an extrovert...
    Same, I noticed E/I early on. One is an introvert and one is an extrovert.

  7. #7
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    Same here with my kids. Could tell from very, very early if they were E or I. Two Es and two Is.
    You can get a lot of clues about how they react to things. For example, feeding. I had one that would cry when hungry but would immediately settle down and get quiet as soon as I picked him up and started fumbling with my bra to nurse him. Another one would work herself into such a fit that I learned to work quickly to get her latched on to prevent having to spend the first 10 minutes of feeding getting her calm.

    Somebody quipped on here that all babies are born ultra-demanding ESFJs.

  8. #8
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    According to this page: Personality and Kids I/E and J/P are the first letters to develop (at 2). And of course, these are not even functions, but simply the attitude indicators, or "sociability temperaments".

    At around 7 (according to this site) the functions, which are perspectives information is processed through, begin to differentiate, where one is now preferred by the consciousness of the ego.
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