User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Introspection:

  1. #1
    ThatGirl
    Guest

    Default Introspection:

    Have you ever analyzed yourself into the point there was nothing new to look at?

    As a kid I analyzed my body and physical presence, as a teenager my spirituality, in my twenties my mind, and now I sometimes dabble with emotions (I get those but have yet to be able to accurately predict their meaning).

    But self analysis leads to a slammed door effect. It is addictive to learn about yourself and use that to gain better tools in life and a broader understanding. Then one day, you can no longer come up with anything new, or unlock an unknown feature.

    I am starting to get restless, wondering what else can I do? Craving that ability to wow at myself again. I think building new skills and becoming successful are a good way to start, but those are so cut and dry. They take time to develop and in the meantime my brain still craves.

    I would be curious to know if anyone else has ever experienced something like this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    192

    Default

    Not really, because there are still a lot of questions that are inside of me that I haven't really worked out yet. Also, I can't always figure out the deeper reasons behind some of my actions and thoughts.

    I don't know what to do in your case. I think you can get that similar 'wow' factor from being around people whose insights expand your mind.

    I guess at least try to be happy that you've gotten to know yourself pretty well.

  3. #3
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    There's so much I could do, I think. Develop more patience, organization, more health consciousness... learn a new instrument. I'm more stumped on how to change the world, but I never run out of ideas on how to improve myself (and maybe, indirectly, I help others out through whatever skills I pick up). And I agree, new people can help spark that wow factor.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ColonelGadaafi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    Si
    Socionics
    ESTP
    Posts
    774

    Default

    You could always remove you're temporal lobe.
    "Where can you flee? What road will you use to escape us? Our horses are swift, our arrows sharp, our swords like thunderbolts, our hearts as hard as the mountains, our soldiers as numerous as the sand. Fortresses will not detain us, nor arms stop us. Your prayers to God will not avail against us. We are not moved by tears nor touched by lamentations."

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Well I'm younger than you, so I don't know how I'll see it if I'm your age, but I think actually there is always something new to learn and discover.
    First because the things in the world outside yourself constantly change, so you always experience new things, and by these new things you have always new mental reactions or issues of whatever. Maybe you could see the world outside as mirror for the world inside of you...
    Furthermore, because you can always introspect of introspection itself. You are a consious being, but what is consiousness? What's the difference between your consiousness in everyday life and in dreams? What if the world is actually a dream? What is more real your consiousness, thoughts and feelings or the material world outside? Enough to learn and think about, I think so...
    Good luck.
    Personality type: INTJ Enneagramtype: 5w4 Neurodiversity: Asperger's Syndrome
    The aim of life is self-development. To realize one's nature perfectly - that is what each of us is here for. - Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,124

    Default

    Almost all of my well developed functions, with the exception of Ti, are Extroverted functions... I actually think that some of my introverted functions were better developed when I was younger, but something happened and there's not much good to look at in there anymore... so I quit looking... why bother when you know

    I prefer the outside world... that's what I focus on
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  7. #7
    Senior Member FallsPioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    260

    Default

    Well, I think that a person can look within himself/herself too much. Over time people mature and learn more about the world, and in this sense people can continually learn more about themselves.

    "Too much introspection at a time," is something that I've done before, I don't know if the same applies to you, but I'd get so caught up in analyzing myself and trying to improve myself that after a while I felt like I wasn't really getting anywhere, that I was just getting nitpicky. Plus I didn't want to think about myself all of the time, it was skewing the way I looked at the world around me. It was addictive to me too in the beginning, I'm only thankful now that I can cut back.

    You're not too interested in developing new skill sets or becoming successful...might I suggest another hobby? It's such a contrived response to give, but in many cases it's actually quite helpful, if you invest yourself well.
    Still using a needle to break apart a grain of sand.

  8. #8
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FallsPioneer View Post
    Well, I think that a person can look within himself/herself too much. Over time people mature and learn more about the world, and in this sense people can continually learn more about themselves.

    "Too much introspection at a time," is something that I've done before, I don't know if the same applies to you, but I'd get so caught up in analyzing myself and trying to improve myself that after a while I felt like I wasn't really getting anywhere, that I was just getting nitpicky. Plus I didn't want to think about myself all of the time, it was skewing the way I looked at the world around me. It was addictive to me too in the beginning, I'm only thankful now that I can cut back.

    You're not too interested in developing new skill sets or becoming successful...might I suggest another hobby? It's such a contrived response to give, but in many cases it's actually quite helpful, if you invest yourself well.
    exactly, just do some stuff and learn from your surroundings some more, you'd think an extraverted function would be required to feed introversion properly.
    5 3 9

  9. #9
    Senior Member MiasmaResonance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w? sp/sx
    Posts
    156

    Default

    You have yet to experience everything that comes with living. With each experience, tumultuous or steady, an underlying facet of our personality is utilized. You will observe and "analyze" these developments. You have done this your entire life, as you've stated. It doesn't end, it never ends. It merely unfolds.

    Most people will never find what they are looking for within themselves, but rather they will settle on an alternate dream or reality. This is how they "go on" in life, whether in fantasy or truth.

    I, personally, have not the slightest of what I want from myself. I've done everything you've done: all of the stages, the analyzing, though the depth of this all will of course vary, due to the factors of personality, intelligence, experiences, etc., which are all important in the grand equation.

    I can say that, yes, I've gone and go through similar things.
    I cannot, however, give you a solution. The greatest minds in the world have given us words of wisdom, yes, but each will find an inadequacy in this. There is never a finite solution in the end.

    I suggest you find something in what you feel, this "restlessness", and analyze that itself. This may not work for you; it is failing to work for me, but I suppose it's worth a try if you want to move on. Then again, I am 15. I cannot say that I've had much "real world" experience, but I do have my personality and my brain, and I have to work with that for now. Eh?
    "A spill at the plant increased the phosphates in the lake and produced a scum of algae so thick that the swamp smell filled the air, infiltrating the genteel mansions. Debutantes cried over the misfortune of coming out in a season everyone would remember for its bad smell."

  10. #10
    Senior Member InsatiableCuriosity's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MiasmaResonance View Post
    You have yet to experience everything that comes with living. With each experience, tumultuous or steady, an underlying facet of our personality is utilized. You will observe and "analyze" these developments. You have done this your entire life, as you've stated. It doesn't end, it never ends. It merely unfolds.

    Most people will never find what they are looking for within themselves, but rather they will settle on an alternate dream or reality. This is how they "go on" in life, whether in fantasy or truth.

    I, personally, have not the slightest of what I want from myself. I've done everything you've done: all of the stages, the analyzing, though the depth of this all will of course vary, due to the factors of personality, intelligence, experiences, etc., which are all important in the grand equation.

    I can say that, yes, I've gone and go through similar things.
    I cannot, however, give you a solution. The greatest minds in the world have given us words of wisdom, yes, but each will find an inadequacy in this. There is never a finite solution in the end.

    I suggest you find something in what you feel, this "restlessness", and analyze that itself. This may not work for you; it is failing to work for me, but I suppose it's worth a try if you want to move on. Then again, I am 15. I cannot say that I've had much "real world" experience, but I do have my personality and my brain, and I have to work with that for now. Eh?
    A very profound and insightful statement for a 15yo!
    "Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible."
    — Richard P. Feynman

    "Never tell a person a thing is impossible. G*d/the Universe may have been waiting all this time for someone ignorant enough of the impossibility to do just that thing."
    author unknown

Similar Threads

  1. [E9] 9s and introspection
    By Asterion in forum Enneatypes
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-26-2011, 08:20 PM
  2. [MBTItm] Introspection Vs. Extrospection
    By Crescent Fresh in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-20-2011, 11:49 PM
  3. Career planning and less introspective types
    By entropie in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 09:15 PM
  4. Introspective Introvert is What? >__>
    By Caligula in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 02-08-2010, 01:41 AM
  5. Introspection
    By Asterion in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-22-2010, 09:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO