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  1. #11
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    they tried to fit me INTO the stereotype or attributed any of my quirks to "being crazy"... I just don't care to deal with it
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  2. #12
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    yeah, people suck that way. You even see sterotyping on this site when it comes to type. and then theirs also the people who think they have mental illness figured out. ANd it's like that's why their's still stigma because you won't admit that you can't possibly understand every mental illness, I don't even full understand what I have but I do know how it manifests in myself so i know when i'm going into an episode. But I do not understand bipolar disorder at all but people can be very different within the disorder. the disorder doesn't define a person, it's just part of who they are.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  3. #13
    Cat Wench ReadingRainbows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kastor View Post
    I feel this way with my mom sometimes, especially the not trying hard enough bit. It's like she thinks that just because I'm on two perscription drugs that my mental problems should just magically disappear. She says, 'You're on your pills, this shouldn't be happening.'
    I have a mom like that. In fact it was neglect that like that could possibly be part of the root cause of mental illness (another point is raising your kids in an unstable enviroment). I've always been on the higher functioning spectrum of those of my diagnosis, but I was in a group home/halfway house setting when I was 18, and I saw all levels of functioning. I recieved my offical diagnosis at age 15. That being said, a lot of my life skills had to be fine tuned at a later age.

    Anyone who calls someone with a mental illness lazy, esspecially those with a lower GAF score (Global Assessment of Functioning, it's included on the diagnosis sheet)

    And the medicine they give you can do some nasty stuff to your body ( went from weighing 135 to 185 in one year as a teen and I already had body image issues at 135) It makes you wonder if it's really worth it sometimes.
    I'm a member of a group called NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) and working on a degree in psychology (hopefully) The stigma that still exists. I usually start to ignore ignorant people after I make an attempt to educate them, and if they are unresponsive to what I am saying. People believe what they want to believe you know? I do kinda get ashamed about having state health care, but then I get reminded by the people around me that I work and should not be ashamed, because I am working towards something better.
    Supportive people are key to doing well
    Quote Originally Posted by EffEmDoubleyou View Post
    St. Stephen took rocks and St. Sebastian took arrows. You only have to take some jerks on an internet forum. Nut up.

  4. #14
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    yeah, people suck that way. You even see sterotyping on this site when it comes to type. and then theirs also the people who think they have mental illness figured out. ANd it's like that's why their's still stigma because you won't admit that you can't possibly understand every mental illness, I don't even full understand what I have but I do know how it manifests in myself so i know when i'm going into an episode. But I do not understand bipolar disorder at all but people can be very different within the disorder. the disorder doesn't define a person, it's just part of who they are.
    very true there... it's like defining someone by or a physical disability (like my limp and inability to run or skip ) it's not who the person IS and it's not like they want it... to judge them by it is pretty cruel

    and people are in general either intellectually lazy or intellectually haughty and refuse to admit when they don't know something... this seems to lead to putting people in premade little boxes based on the most extreme behavior
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  5. #15
    Ghost Monkey Soul Vizconde's Avatar
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    I have a cousin who has schitzophrenia...and being of Irish heritage its more accepted than most cultures...sometimes when someone goes off the deep end of a head trip I am tempted to make light or a little fun of it, however often hold off especially if I suspect others will respond to the fun making in a meaner or harsher way.

    The brain is a complex organ. Who is to say what is normal and what is not...and who wants to be normal anyways?
    I redact everything I have written or will write on this forum prior to, subsequent with and or after the fact of its writing. For entertainment purposes only and not to be taken seriously nor literally.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    Spamtar - a strange combination of boorish drunkeness and erudite discussions, or what I call "an Irish academic"

  6. #16
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    At the end of the day meds do save lives in the short term. While I disagree with the approach and believe the whole industry is misguided and misinformed in their approach to dealing with mental health. there are no quick fixes and cures and I have come to the conclusion the industry themselves cause the stigma as much as the public by mistreating you their clients and patients. by being lazy and taking the easy way out, which is prescribe anti depressants, anti everything because they just assume its one trigger as a cause, too much effort and a waste of their time, see a therapist. You spend hours, years of your time supposedly trying to reconcile your issues...only to rarely reconcile your issues and find out its all been a waste of your time. People like fast results like fast food, except with fast results your stitching up the wound and hardly the infection...

    Its almost like the medical profession is inflexible, prove it through blood, if your blood fails so do you. Never mind the physical symptoms, especially when certain substances mask results and create an illusion of good times but bad times in your body still. Its just a mental illness take a pill, next please!

    People don't like being challenged or questioned, neither are they interested in hearing other peoples views when they are convinced their ideas are true and accurate. Suppose its like that with core beliefs, I might be dismayed with the system since its failed me, but then it has a lot of people. Who then think what they are going through is normal, convinced it is and unlikely to question it much since meds keep them afloat and Dr and Psychologists are the final word...

    Suppose after a decade or more you get tired of it and thats when you start wanting proper answers. When for a time you feel better and when you stop with the meds, for years, your convinced that they worked. Somehow unaware that this was created like a short term pump that would burst again. and then you assume the relapse is normal too, maybe the next one after that too.

    When your still a child they say take an adult with you to cross the road because the field of vision isn't as developed. I sometimes wonder at people, maybe sometimes the field of vision stays poor for reasons like money, at least the drug companies and the proliferation of industries surrounding the mental health industry are happy but your not or are you?

    Maybe its unusual that iodine was removed from bread and bromide was introduced. Maybe it isn't that unusual that last year iodized salt had been reintroduced in Australian bread, don't know about other countries legislation but still makes me wonder why.

  7. #17
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spamtar View Post
    Who is to say what is normal and what is not...and who wants to be normal anyways?
    The Bell Curve says what is normal.

    And it turns out that almost all of us are normal, but there are a tiny number who are subnormal, and an equally tiny number who are abnormal.

  8. #18
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    yeah- I'm aware of the public image attached to bipolar disorder- especially by ignorant people, so I just don't tell anyone about it!
    What public image is that? My impression is in the UK people see it as glamourous, or something geniuses or the highly talented get, probably because a lot of highly respected public figures have it or are thought to have had it and that's what it's mainly known for here (which I imagine presents its own problems). Possibly people also think of the so-called 'artistic temperament' when they hear it described. I have noticed anecdotally that Americans seem more defensive about it. Does it have a different reputation in other countries?

  9. #19
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    I live in a less educated area of the city... the prevailing image here is that someone who's bipolar is completely crazy and just might chop you up in your sleep if the wrong mood hits... not to mention I'm supposed to be emotionally unstable :rolli:

    the weird thing is, I'm more emotionally stable and less homocidal than a lot of "sane" people I know
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  10. #20
    Senior Member Little_Sticks's Avatar
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    ^ OMG, Don't believe her people! She wants to chop you up!

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