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  1. #11
    Senior Member LeafAndSky's Avatar
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    nolla, yes I did look up various psychological classifications, disorders and such. I didn't see anything that fit or gave me any clues.

    KDude, thank you, the person was venting at the time, stressed or frustrated about two separate issues, so maybe talking about not wanting to be around people because they're stupid is a way that person vents. And it goes along with a political view of (USA) society going down the tubes (which could be accurate enough, and threatens personal quality of life, and could be said to be caused by the actions of 'stupid' people).

    xNTP and KDude, laughing to avoid social friction is a social mammal thing, right? Like chimps do, or wolves -- a submissive thing in the presence of an alpha. Or at least it's possible to look at what you described that way, that the people at the party were doing what comes naturally, doing the social appeasement work necessary to hang on to or uphold their place in the pack.

    They're functioning effectively -- it's really not possible for people to live alone, as 'it takes a village' to raise children (to support and protect new mothers), etc.

    Which brings me to something else I've wondered, and since this thread is already wandering, I'll wander further. People like Gandhi will spend time around an 'alpha' and not do the submissive thing, which shocks the alpha and the people watching. The same thing happens when someone stands up for an ideal in a workplace. Someone 'thinking for themselves' and taking a stand on an issue usually shocks people.

    It's hard to think of Gandhi as an alpha himself, and it's hard to think of the one standing for a principal in a workplace as an alpha. Their behavior isn't a domination thing -- or is it? It certainly is a refusal to be dominated.

  2. #12
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Well, let's face it! Most people ARE stupid!

    But I'm cool with it as long as it doesn't effect me in some ill way. After all, if people weren't stupid, who would provide the entertainment?

    Hell, half the time I'm stupid, too.

  3. #13
    Senor Membrane
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeafAndSky View Post
    People like Gandhi will spend time around an 'alpha' and not do the submissive thing, which shocks the alpha and the people watching. The same thing happens when someone stands up for an ideal in a workplace. Someone 'thinking for themselves' and taking a stand on an issue usually shocks people.

    It's hard to think of Gandhi as an alpha himself, and it's hard to think of the one standing for a principal in a workplace as an alpha. Their behavior isn't a domination thing -- or is it? It certainly is a refusal to be dominated.
    Oh, that is an interesting thought/question... I don't know if it is a refusal to be dominated. I think such a person sees the game for what it is and doesn't approve or disapprove it, he just drops out of it. If someone wants to "dominate", I bet an enlightened person would not make a point to not be dominated. But if he needed to get something done, he would not let the alpha male stand in his way.

  4. #14
    Senior Member LeafAndSky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    was it a bitter, warped, late teen/early twentysomething who rarely gets a date or gets laid?

    if so, I think the answer should be clear!

    (those are the usual suspects for being misanthropic little pricks)

    No, not a single one of those things! The person has a balanced view of their past (which has included intimate relationships), is glad to have a good career, and enjoys hobbies. Not bitter. I think I'm going to put their comment down to:

    a frustrated intellectual who's venting.

  5. #15
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
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    People do do some stupid things in their lives, hell, we all do. Thankfully, there are usually repercusions and we eventually learn not to. Take misanthropy for example... repercusion=> social isolation => depression. People aren't perfect and they never will be, and of course it's sad watching people learn something that you've already learned or consider obvious, like not crushing a piece of glass in your hand when you're wasted, or not beating your children.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    Thankfully, there are usually repercusions and we eventually learn not to.
    There are stupid things you can do that are rewarded in the kind of society we live in. These are the things that the "frustrated intellectual" would feel frustrated about.

  7. #17
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeafAndSky View Post
    Which brings me to something else I've wondered, and since this thread is already wandering, I'll wander further. People like Gandhi will spend time around an 'alpha' and not do the submissive thing, which shocks the alpha and the people watching. The same thing happens when someone stands up for an ideal in a workplace. Someone 'thinking for themselves' and taking a stand on an issue usually shocks people.

    It's hard to think of Gandhi as an alpha himself, and it's hard to think of the one standing for a principal in a workplace as an alpha. Their behavior isn't a domination thing -- or is it? It certainly is a refusal to be dominated.
    I didn't know that about Gandhi. I don't think he's being alpha himself. I think he's transcending just another form of, what he saw as, hostile interaction - albeit, this one is more casual and a little less harmless than what he usually dealt with. And yes, it's a refusal to be dominated, but non-violent resitance, as a philosophy, has broader goals than just a personal refusal to be dominated. He's critiquing a general lack of equality for everyone.

    I would refuse to be dominated too, but it's personal. I'm not trying to stick up for everyone when I don't rever authority. I'm telling people they need to earn my respect or give me some reasons for it first. And some reasons are fairly apparent.. if they were already well known for something I admired, they'd get my respect. Maybe even an old person would get the benefit of the doubt too, even when they say something silly.

    As for "alphas", no. I addressed this in another thread earlier. I don't even know what an alpha is half of time. Much of what gets passed off as one is ridiculous.

  8. #18
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    There are stupid things you can do that are rewarded in the kind of society we live in. These are the things that the "frustrated intellectual" would feel frustrated about.
    like what? I can see what you mean, but I can't think of anything that fits that description.
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Snow Turtle's Avatar
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    I don't believe it's really true at all. From my perspective, it's more to do with individuals who find it difficult to click with others than it being related to the other persons intelligence. Lots of people might have a lack of interest in their favourite topics, but that doesn't indicate a lack of intelligence at all. Then there are just people who don't really care to engage in debate and discussion, but once again... not a good indicator of intelligence.

    I've no idea whether it's a myth or just stereotyping on my behalf, but group behaviour/thinking tends to be quite different from an individual person acting alone. It's almost like group behaviour promotes silly behaviour for social fluidness, but when you catch the person by themselves, suddenly it's completely different.

    The amount of times I've thought to myself: Hmmm... That group seems really wild and silly and then thought... "Wait a second, don't I do that sometimes when I'm with my group of friends? Making pokemon related jokes and so fourth."

    It does sound like your friend is observing people as a society thing. Then again maybe I'm just 'not intelligent' and therefore don't understand his problem.

  10. #20
    Senior Member LeafAndSky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    like what? I can see what you mean, but I can't think of anything that fits that description.
    Rewarded with money for doing something that's harmful to the environment?

    Rewarded with a promotion for activities that harmed your co-workers and seriously damaged company morale, making people not want to do a good job at the company?

    I guess, rewarded for short-term profits over longer-term stability.

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