User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 59

  1. #21
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Look at how often the person objecting to the generalization and claiming it's an unfounded stereotype is a member of the group being generalized about.

    I'm not black.
    I'm not homosexual.
    I'm not female.

    I object to stupidity.

  2. #22
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    I'm not black.
    I'm not homosexual.
    I'm not female.

    I object to stupidity.
    You realize that you're kind of helping to prove Sim's point, right?

  3. #23
    mrs disregard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    7,855

    Default

    Stereotypes are limiting where generalisations are helpful.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    Does generalising a certain group mean one is stereotyping? If not then why does one accuse someone else of stereotyping when they generalise?

    Examples of generalisations:
    - Usually, women suck at computers
    - Usually, women don't know how to drive
    - Usually, men are idiots while women are smart
    - Usually, men only care about sex when trying to hook up with a woman
    - Usually, a child doesn't know any better than an adult

    Cancel out the 'usually' then we have stereotyping. But doesn't generalising have some truth in it? If I go somewhere and the people at the place treat me in a certain way I will generalise saying the people over at this place treat me like 'this and that'. It wouldn't necessarily be stereotyping would it?

    I would think many confuse generalisations with stereotyping. (if they of course aren't the same)
    Any views on the matter?
    I think they are confused, they arent the same thing though.

    I also think people generalise about things that they shouldnt, for instance generalising their own experience to everyone else, sometimes unconsciously, when they shouldnt and that can give rise to stereotypes.

  5. #25
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    I'm not black.
    I'm not homosexual.
    I'm not female.

    I object to stupidity.
    Translation: "I'm a single counterexample so your point is ruined!"

    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  6. #26
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    A lot of the time generalizations are accurate whereas stereotypes are often driven by emotion and are overly negative.
    Nope, that would be prejudice. Attaching an emotional reaction to stereotypes = prejudice. Acting on them = discrimination.

    Generalizing is kinda like observing a group and seeing what traits they have in common, whereas stereotyping is (imo) more like trying to find ways to discriminate against a group that you don't like.
    Nope. See above.

    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    When we stereotype, we stick people into a mold into which they may not fit. Stereotyping is typically done blindly and carries a more narrow-minded view with it. Perhaps we see a general trend and attempt to associate a causal relationship with the character trait and the character.
    Yes.

    Stereotyping seems to have a snowball affect and be less susceptible to change. Stereotyping is forming a rather narrow mold (rashly based on our experience and/or indoctrination) and [unconsciously?] sticking people into that mold prematurely.
    Yes.

    When we generalize, however, we are grouping data based on some sort of reality, and the data does not carry any extra weight with it. Though we often may not have tangible statistics on an issue, we can gather information from our own experience and realize that we have indeed noticed that women are typically less likely to be interested in automobiles, so we say something to the tune of "It seems that women are less likely to enjoy automobiles" (while making no corollary claims as a result of that initial observation).
    Yes.

    Stereotyping is (forcefully?) cramming someone into a rather arbitrary mold, while generalizing is creating an everchanging mold that is subject to tweaks based on our experience.
    Yes.

    To put it more specifically, the way these definitions are differentiated is by thinking of generalization as the beginning point, and stereotyping as the end point.

    Meaning, generalization makes a comment on the trends observed, while stereotyping is a conclusion, that boxes someone in, given only the general trends observed.

    Generalization leaves it at the "general" level, to allow for further investigation, while stereotyping applies it at a personal level, and calls it truth.

    All Asians must be good at math. (stereotype)
    Asians tend to be good at math. (generalization)
    Lee is Asian so he must be good at math. (stereotyping)
    Lee is an Asian, maybe he's good at math? (generalizing)

  7. #27
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    7,917

    Default

    Poignant generalizations are a good thing. We need them. And science relies on them.

    A stereotype is basically an oversimplified or poor generalization.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Translation: "I'm a single counterexample so your point is ruined!"
    You still don't get it. Jesus.

  9. #29
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,193

    Default

    Generalizations are accurate observations given a certain sample size that describe trends.

    Stereotypes are the same thing, but they just make people feel bad, and thus, are wrong.



  10. #30
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    isfp
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    8,595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    Examples of generalisations:
    - Usually, women suck at computers
    - Usually, women don't know how to drive
    - Usually, men are idiots while women are smart
    - Usually, men only care about sex when trying to hook up with a woman
    - Usually, a child doesn't know any better than an adult
    The word "usually" is not much of a disclaimer because it is rather imprecise. Placing it in front of a stereotype does not transform it into a rationally based generalization. A generalization needs to be backed up with some sort of statistical data and the statement should reasonably relate to that data. What makes these above statements less useful is that even though they have the disclaimer, "usually", the content of the statement is too extreme, too absolute, and many are not supported by any sort of data.

    I understand a generalization to be more like, "women are more often employed as nurses than men" or something like that. What about the following:

    Women in general do have not as much training or knowledge in the computer field as men do.

    Car insurance for women tends to be less expensive because they are involved in fewer accidents than men, so women generally are safer drivers than men.

    etc.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

Similar Threads

  1. MBTI stereotypes
    By erm in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 134
    Last Post: 06-15-2015, 07:07 AM
  2. [MBTItm] Sensors, how do you react to stereotypes?
    By labyrinthine in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 02-01-2010, 08:34 AM
  3. [SJ] I'd like to advance a wild generalisation: SJs hate metal
    By Mort Belfry in forum The SJ Guardhouse (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ)
    Replies: 116
    Last Post: 09-29-2009, 04:13 AM
  4. [JCF] Blinded By Gender Stereotypes
    By "?" in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 12-08-2008, 03:22 PM
  5. Please... Stereotype!
    By miss fortune in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 01-27-2008, 05:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO