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Thread: Big Five - neuroticism

  1. #11
    Senor Membrane Array
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    May 2008


    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    I think everything can be changed - within broad limits. takes a lot of practice though.
    I can't deny I am an INFP (I have actually tried that. Before I knew I was INFP, though...). I can, however deny my Big Five and practice openness or conscientiousness, as you said, or I can develop neurotic symptoms accidentally. So, I wouldn't call the pattern seen through Big Five my personality. It is more like "the things we do", or "what we are now" than what we are next year or next decade. That essence that doesn't change is my personality, and INFP does describe it pretty well.

  2. #12


    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post

    also, neuroticism (as measured in Big Five) has the lowest correlation to any mbti trait. it's unrelated to S-N measures.

    Myers-Briggs Type Indicator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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  3. #13
    ⒺⓉⒷ Array Eric B's Avatar
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    Mar 2008
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    An extension of the MBTI, the Type Differentiation Indicator, adds another dichotomy called "Comfort-Discomfort" that is supposed to correspond to Neuroticism. From what I've read, subscales for it were originally included in MBTI research, but dropped for fear of being too negative.

    Neuroticism had its origin with Eysenck, who used it in his version of the Galen temperaments as the other factor besides extraversion. Most systems using Galen use people/task, which would seem to correspond with Agreeableness, and the two were similar. Melancholic and Choleric (the task-oriented pair) were high Neurotic, and Sanguine and Phlegmatic (the people-oriented pair) were low. So then, different temperaments did have tendencies towards Neuroticism or stability.
    (Conscientiousness, BTW, would correspond with Keirsey's Cooperative/Pragmatic. But the correlation studies don't match the FFM factors with Keirsey's; it's always with the four MBTI dichotomies, which do not correspond as closely.
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  4. #14
    That's my name biotch! Array JoSunshine's Avatar
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    Dec 2009


    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    I don't even see how neuroticism could be part of personality. You get more healthy and your neuroticism goes down, duh...
    This would seem to be the case, however it has been found that people with extremely low neuroticsm scores can be "emotional stuffers". In other words people who have difficulty accepting or dealing with any kind of negative feelings and therefore choose to deny (and avoid) them on a subconcious level. To be a least a bit "neurotic" is to be human.
    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. " - Dr. Seuss
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    Extroverted (E) 52.5%........Introverted (I) 47.5%
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    Feeling (F) 55.56%............Thinking (T) 44.44%
    Judging (J) 51.43%............Perceiving (P) 48.57%

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