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    Junior Member Anabel's Avatar
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    Default Autism/Aspergers/PDD-NOS

    I've read on here that most people with an autism spectrum disorder are T's. Can anyone offer any insight into having an extremely high F (approx 95% vs 5% T) and being on the spectrum?

    Is it likely that you could have such a high F and still be on the spectrum?

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    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anabel View Post
    I've read on here that most people with an autism spectrum disorder are T's. Can anyone offer any insight into having an extremely high F (approx 95% vs 5% T) and being on the spectrum?

    Is it likely that you could have such a high F and still be on the spectrum?
    Some AS experts now think that AS people are hyper sensitive to emotional stimulus. Thus they learn at a young age to avoid things like eye contact and other more emotive sharing. Its just a theory. It might however explain "F" AS people.

    If you go to the "wrongplanet" forum, you will not find people who dont feel. I would bet a fair amount are F's that have other AS issues. Its a continuum and has varying reasons for diagnosis. AS does not by definition mean MBTI T (i know you never said that ).

    I'd say an F with AS would be someone who identifies with values over (huge stereotype applied here, forgive me). They might crave personal connection at times. Yet they still might tend to have "special interests", be "little professors" and have issues with eye contact and emotive give/take.

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    Junior Member Anabel's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link :-)

    Yes, I've only just read about hyper sensitivity in Aspergers. I always thought the disorder was associated with lack of empathy etc, however am beginning to realise this is not the case. In my own experience, quite the opposite and this has now led me to look at the disorder in a different way.

    A thought that crossed my mind;
    In a way a high F in someone with ASD could be related to things their upbringing taught them. For example, someone brought up in a strict Christian community where Christian values were firmly instilled could adopt those as part of the autistic spectrum traits of always having to follow rules, instructions etc and therefore have a high F because of those Christian values that were so firmly instilled in them and can often come across as 'instructions' or 'rules'.

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