User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 69

Thread: Anxiety Attacks

  1. #1
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    isfp
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    8,584

    Default Anxiety Attacks

    I searched for a thread on this topic and didn't find one specifically, but was wondering if anyone else faces these and what sorts of approaches you take to deal with them.

    I've always had a background level of anxiety in my life, but have always managed to control it and do whatever is required of me at the time for the most part. I've always made progress despite the anxiety. My life right now is quite good externally, but for some reason every single night I wake up with a severe anxiety attack. It is so bad that I had started taking sleeping medication to be sure I don't wake up at night. When I do, I just take more. I have my own theories about what is going on, and don't need to go into the psychological aspects of it, but am curious about nutrition and other external ways of managing the problem. I am going to start doing some meditation and try to cut back on my work load as well.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.

  2. #2
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    infj
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    i don't have any special expertise, but an anxiety attack happens when your anxiety becomes a positive feedback loop that you can not break. you feel like you can no longer regulate it, and the loss of control creates more problems. the very basic advices of deep breathing (first and foremost!) and maybe some light stretching would be the starting point. meditation will have an extremely positive long-term effect. i'd recommend bikram yoga VERY highly as well, it is very cathartic and stress relieving. trying to get more sleep, and maybe trying to see a psychologist or explore some of your fears in a direct and supportive way would be very helpful. the tighter they are locked down and unaddressible the less conscious control you have to confront them, deal with them, re-direct them, recognize them when they start to flare up, etc.

    feeling loved and understood by someone else does the most for this, but it is the most difficult solution to find. if you live in california and you're in the mood for some medical marijuana, that might not be the worst solution in the world either. with or without it, journaling also might be a good way to recover the parts of yourself that get unconsciously brushed aside and linger on throughout the day, wearing on you and weighing you down. i'm consistently amazed how much i am able to evolve when i recognize the problem.

  3. #3
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    isfp
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    8,584

    Default

    Thanks, the state i am in. Those are good thoughts. I think a lot of people have anxiety attacks and the causes can be from a variety of sources. I just wonder if there is a physiological element for some, possibly myself. For a short-term issue I have a performance tomorrow that is stressing me out because it is at the edge of my ability and the first run-through performance I couldn't play the hardest passage because my hands were shaking. I've been working on it since July. It is unpleasant to be placed on stage when feeling vulnerable. I need to rework my worldview as well. There are enough good things in place that I think I will get it under control once and for all, but it never hurts to hear new strategies.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.

  4. #4
    Senior Member proximo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    584

    Default

    If you don't mind my asking, what do you mean exactly by "anxiety attack"? I'm thinking I might have experienced something similar, but I can't be sure we're talking about the same thing...

    Is it when you find your heart beats irregularly and you feel like you can't breathe properly, you just feel really tense and you can't relax at all or take your mind off it however you try, or if you do manage to, it comes back pretty soon anyway? And it seems to be for no apparent reason, as there's nothing specific you can point to as a reason why you're feeling like it?
    I'm male and over 30, FYI.
    Preferences: 20% Extravert, 98% Intuitive, 68% Thinker, 17% Perceiving

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    192

    Default

    You could try eating more raw foods Raw Food Diet - What is the Raw Food Diet

    I'm a pretty anxious person but i definitely find that the less crappy food i am eating the clearer and calmer i feel (exercise also helps to reduce my anxiety). Reducing caffeine intake wouldn't hurt either. The 3 most neurotic people in my family are by far the biggest coffee drinkers, haha.

    Good luck in finding a way to stop the attacks, they must be horrible

  6. #6
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    isfp
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    8,584

    Default

    I had one of my worst anxiety attacks last evening as I was driving home from work. It was mostly physiological feeling light-headed, my face and neck burning hot, increased heart-rate. I was driving on an interstate and had an overwhelming fear that I was going to pass out. I had a few miles until my exit, so I rolled down my window to get oxygen and sang goofy songs to focus and calm down. It felt like I was going to die. It was shocking enough to me that I'm not going to take the interstate again for at least a month until I have proof it isn't going to happen again. On a two-lane road I can pull over at any spot if I feel light-headed.

    There is a tidal wave of anxiety just under the radar in my mind. I think there are a few layers involved. There is enough resolved in my life right now that my mind thinks it is safe to work through it, I think. I am going to do meditation to try to address it. When I face crisis situations I tend to suppress emotions so that I can think clearly and solve the problem. In some ways I have gotten too good at it, and while I like the effect it has on my decision-making, this subconscious anxiety attack bit needs to go.

    I'm always curious how other people experience these things and how they deal with it.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.

  7. #7
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    6,748

    Default Counterattack!

    Hi there, Toonia.
    I'm not normally participating in the threads right now because it is too time consuming, but have been reading some. I just wanted to share my history and some insights about panic attacks, since I can't help myself from trying to help someone in the same situation.

    I started panic attacks about 3 or 4 years ago, the first one waking up with severe chest pain, everything appearing as though I was under water, throat constriction, "derealization" or a feeling that I was in a dream or the world was not real, and "depersonalization" or a feeling that I was kind of floating outside of my own body. I was freezing cold as if all the blood had run from my body, and numb. I had my roommate call 911 and eventually lost my vision for a brief time.

    I've suffered panic attacks since, but the good news is that I now have some knowledge about my own body and panic to be able to abort them pretty quickly.

    These are the things that have helped me.

    Zoloft. Add on Klonopin for acute attacks. I was on this regimen for 6 months and eventually stopped once I felt the panic was under control.

    During or at the onset of an attack.


    Pacing and walking.


    Breathing into a paper bag
    . Clamp it right over your mouth and nose. (Many of the uncomfortable symptoms are caused by hyperventilation, and kind of correcting that C02/02 imbalance seems to get rid of my chest pain immediately. There is some information out there on the anatomy of a panic attack.)

    Deep breathing: There is a certain way that you breathe when you are in panic mode that you don't realize, and there is a way to breathe that helps restore the balance of chemicals in your system and get the right amount of oxygen. (See the website below, I think it describes the breathing better than I can.)

    Don't panic.
    This one sounds silly, but its true. My counselor and nurse practitioner advised me of this. Basically if you accept the panic attack for what it is, and kind of "fall" into it, or let it take its toll without fighting it, it tends to resolve quicker.

    Know that panic attacks do not have long term negative effect on your body: but is actually just like getting a work out, and physically can be good for you. (I used to think that I was going to have a stroke or a heart attack, but turns out the truth is quite the opposite.) The chest pain is all muscular, by the way.

    "The Lemon Trick":I've never tried this one. It's one I learned in nursing school, and it sounds helpful. When you're having an acute attack, take a slice of lemon, (an orange, or icecube whatever.) Focus on it, describe its color, scent, what it reminds you of, stick it in your mouth. (Nothing like a lemon in your mouth to bring you back to the moment.) This is supposed to take the focus off of the attack. Again, i've never tried it, but I guess it's been successful in a lot of people.


    Long term anxiety/prevention:

    EXERCISE. Why do I do cardio workouts six days a week to this day? During the time when I was having attacks (with no control), I started working out vigorously, and it really corrected that imbalance in my brain. It helped me calm down and think clearly, and it is the one thing that I believe took me off medications and onto my own life. We know that working out helps you lose weight, feel better, blah blah blah. But that would never be enough for me to keep going back. Stop panic attacks and not have to take medication and move on with my life? That's the best motivator for me to get out and exercise. I can't say enough about this method. Sometimes when I stop working out, I do have panic attacks still to this day. (And then I just do all of the things listed above, and usually can get rid of them before they really get going.) I've just accepted that I have a weird body that needs to move a lot to be happy. So be it!

    DIET: I think that eating healthy, getting enough B12 from your meats, (or supplement if you need that), and fish oils to help your brain function optimally helps.

    DON'T CATASTROPHIZE EVERYTHING:
    My counselor noticed that I was trying to do everything at once and made a big catastrophe in my head if I didn't get these things done. (If I don't get a new job, I won't have enough money to feed myself! If I don't pass the test, my career will be ruined!") I didn't realize I was doing that, of course. But now I try to focus on one thing at a time. I'm not sure if that's true for you, too.




    These are the things that have truly helped me overcome that panic. Of course some of them might or might not work for you. I recommend trying these practical, sensory type things, since panic attacks tend to be a physical manifestation of the psychological anxiety. (And after reading your posts, I think that you may be on the same page as me with this.) And then of course manage that underlying anxiety however it works for you. Also see a good therapist. Mine was so good he had me out of there in 3 or 4 sessions with a good plan.



    Below is a website that I just found. I never used it myself, but used some other sources and websites and of course the therapist and practitioner's help, and the help of others' who have had the same problem, and this site appears to cover most of the basic info. (Specifically the breathing is what I wanted you to look at. )
    Remember that anxiety and panic are very treatable and there are many non-pharmaceutical methods to help you handle it.

    There is tons and tons more info. out there. The more you know the better you will do!

    Good luck and hope this helped.
    Free self-help for panic, anxiety, worries, PTSD, phobias, fear of flying, social phobias


    Oh, and if you're driving,during an attack, pull over. (Edit: oops, just read that you do that. Good.)
    Last edited by King sns; 02-04-2010 at 08:30 AM.
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

    My Nohari
    My Johari
    by sns.

  8. #8
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Yeah taking a deep breathe and realizing you are having an anxiety attack certainly helps. If a certain situation is causing you anxiety, get away from it for the time being untill you've calmed down.

    Shortnsweet has given alot of good advice. Best of luck to you toonia. I know from first hand experience what anxiety attacks are like.

  9. #9
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    I
    Posts
    3,104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    I had one of my worst anxiety attacks last evening as I was driving home from work. It was mostly physiological feeling light-headed, my face and neck burning hot, increased heart-rate. I was driving on an interstate and had an overwhelming fear that I was going to pass out. I had a few miles until my exit, so I rolled down my window to get oxygen and sang goofy songs to focus and calm down. It felt like I was going to die. It was shocking enough to me that I'm not going to take the interstate again for at least a month until I have proof it isn't going to happen again. On a two-lane road I can pull over at any spot if I feel light-headed.
    Why do these attacks occur? Is it out of a fear of some particular thing? For example in this case, are you afraid of driving on the interstate? Just trying to find out.

  10. #10
    That's my name biotch! JoSunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    eNfj
    Enneagram
    2
    Posts
    660

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    I am going to do meditation to try to address it. When I face crisis situations I tend to suppress emotions so that I can think clearly and solve the problem. In some ways I have gotten too good at it, and while I like the effect it has on my decision-making, this subconscious anxiety attack bit needs to go.

    I'm always curious how other people experience these things and how they deal with it.
    Well, I've never had an anxiety attack. I have recently learned to use mindfulness meditation (which is basically sitting and allowing yourself to think about whatever comes to mind without judgement or directives). It has been most effective in helping me figure out the causes of my stress. I have a natural tendancy to surpress my own emotions and needs until I reach "critical mass". I'm learning to counteract this by figuring out how I am feeling, what my needs are and then doing something about it by addressing the issue...which usually involves talking to people and setting boundaries...which was super-hard to do in the beginning, but is getting way easier.

    That's what works for me...I am not sure if it will be helpful to you, but either way I wish you the best. I know it must not be easy for you.
    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. " - Dr. Seuss
    I can't spell...get over it

    Slightly ENFJ, totally JoSunshine
    Extroverted (E) 52.5%........Introverted (I) 47.5%
    Intuitive (N) 65.63%..........Sensing (S) 34.38%
    Feeling (F) 55.56%............Thinking (T) 44.44%
    Judging (J) 51.43%............Perceiving (P) 48.57%

Similar Threads

  1. Introversion vs. Social Anxiety ---- Quiz
    By heart in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 152
    Last Post: 10-04-2017, 10:11 PM
  2. [NT] NTs & Anxiety/Panic Attacks/Depression
    By Ezra in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 05-19-2010, 04:28 AM
  3. Teachers stage fake gun attack on kids
    By digesthisickness in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 12-29-2009, 04:35 PM
  4. Anxiety/Panic attacks
    By The Third Rider in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 10-16-2008, 05:34 AM
  5. Conservative attacks on health confirmed
    By rivercrow in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 09-11-2008, 03:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO