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  1. #1
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    Default Books that demonstrate the thought processes of the types

    In some books, the characterization of the main characters is deep enough to give the reader a glimpse of what it is like to be that type.

    The main characters in most of The Asian Saga by James Clavell are ENTJ's.

    Specifically, the book Tai Pan and it's character Dirk Struan demonstrate the way an ENTJ thinks.

    I'm curious to see what books others think demonstrate which types.

    EDIT: I think any ENTJ would really like Tai Pan and I would highly recommend it to anyone.

  2. #2
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    I don't think many authors would deliberately structure their characters true to the MBTI archetypes. It would be pretty limiting as a writer, IMO.

    But I guess, like people, characters are going to more-or-less fit a type, or at least show a thought process somewhat fitting to a type... I always thought Holden from the Catcher in the Rye was a very disillusioned, immature, unhealthy(?) ENFP. The Ne's there, so is the Fi.

    The most convincing characters I've come across while reading, I've felt, were reflections of their authors' styles of thinking, or at least acting out a small part of their authors' personalities. Often with those characters I can feel like I'm living through a different mind.

    I think it's a pity this thread isn't moving along. Book recommendations by type would be really interesting! Maybe it should be moved to 'Arts & Entertainment'?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stutterfly View Post
    I don't think many authors would deliberately structure their characters true to the MBTI archetypes. It would be pretty limiting as a writer, IMO.
    It seems like the best, most credible and consistent characters in books would have easily identifiable types. I don't see how characters true to MBTI would be limiting; it would make the character development more persuasive and powerful, imho.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stutterfly View Post
    But I guess, like people, characters are going to more-or-less fit a type, or at least show a thought process somewhat fitting to a type... I always thought Holden from the Catcher in the Rye was a very disillusioned, immature, unhealthy(?) ENFP. The Ne's there, so is the Fi.
    I'd say Caulfield is more INFP. He is a huge loner and lives primarily in his head, and he lets his emotional struggles get in the way of any sort of profound Ne-based intellectual thought. And surely you mean illusioned?

    Anywho, I think this is a really fun topic, and here's my 2 cents:

    Ayn Rand's "Atlas Shrugged" reeks of xNTJ. "Why am I letting myself be a part of a world that sucks so much? Hm, good question. I'm going to get rid of anybody that stands in my way and start my own new world based on a philosophy backed by nothing more than reason and practicality. Fuck the pitiful and pathetic..." The characters are all very goal-oriented, rational, and independent.

    I'd also say that Slaughterhouse 5 is crazy ENTP. I empathize with that writing style a lot. It's just like free association and random connections chaotically strewn amongst the pages.

    Neil Gaiman's American Gods may be a good manifestation of ISTP thought. The main character has a level-headed, objective approach to most of the antagonistic situations that he runs into, and he easily adapts to overcome the struggles without too much complaint. He also is very in tune with his tangible world, and he uses his physical strength to get out of a lot of sticky situations.

    I think Frank Herbert was either a hardcore xNFJ or had a pretty consistent boner for xNFJs. Either way, the protagonists in his Dune books pretty much all have this crazy ability for foresight. Paul is so mystical and idealistic and convicted to his cause, but he uses his capacity for understanding people and the community as a persuasive force in his efforts. ::tingles with INFJ-love::

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