User Tag List

First 122021222324 Last

Results 211 to 220 of 295

  1. #211
    Senior Member Ruthie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ?
    Posts
    436

    Default

    Yeah, I'm always a fan of the mid-century stuff as well, though I'd include some of the '50s and early - mid '60s (pre-hippie). We were still sort of on our emerging superpower buzz, and got a lot accomplished with the Great Society.

    Funny about the Billy Joel thing - when I was about 8 or 9 years old, that song came out and I decided it would be my "life's goal" to memorize the lyrics. My brother even got a lyrics sheet from somewhere at work and I pinned it up on my wall. I'm one of the lucky ones... accomplished my life's goal by the age of 10.

  2. #212
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I don't see much wilderness anymore. It's all been overtaken by corn.

    Considering that everyone from everywhere else is complaining, we can all say one thing about American culture -- whatever it is, it's very good at perpetuating itself.
    Wilderness is alright.
    I was not complaining. I only answered the question: What does distinguish American culture?
    In Europe you have these orchards, in America you see wheat fields.

    Henry Ford invented America and Finland. There are still people who prefer to walk. Here they look down on the pedestrian. It is because Finland is not Europe.

    In Princeton in the 50s, the local people watched an old man walk home every evening. His hair was long. His shoes did not shine, his trousers were not pressed.
    He had walked all his life. Hitler did not allow him to walk in his native Germany, so he walked in Princeton. He was the only one who walked home in the little town.

  3. #213
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Wilderness is alright.
    I was not complaining. I only answered the question: What does distinguish American culture?
    In Europe you have these orchards, in America you see wheat fields.
    I am so confused. Why is wheat fields more wilderness than orchards? (I should probably note that I have never actually seen a wheat field here in my entire life -- only corn, corn, soybeans, and more corn, with an occasional field of sunflowers in between). In fact, I'd say wheat fields are MORE manmade-looking than orchards. With orchards you replace the trees with different trees -- here, you cut down all the trees and plant shorter plants instead, so you can see all the way to the horizon green and yellow. Maybe it's different further west where there weren't as many trees in the first place, but here, yes, it's very manmade. The patterns are beautiful in their own way, but it's very obvious that man was here and ran his fingers over the landscape to feed the country and make a profit.

    America produces almost half the world's corn. A corn field does not look like a wheat field at all. In fact, they're rather awkward-looking. They start as green little sprouts, and then they grow and grow until they're taller than you in a few month's time, green with red and orange at the very top, and then they're cut down and turn gold.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  4. #214
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I am so confused. Why is wheat fields more wilderness than orchards? (I should probably note that I have never actually seen a wheat field here in my entire life -- only corn, corn, soybeans, and more corn, with an occasional field of sunflowers in between). In fact, I'd say wheat fields are MORE manmade-looking than orchards. With orchards you replace the trees with different trees -- here, you cut down all the trees and plant shorter plants instead, so you can see all the way to the horizon green and yellow. Maybe it's different further west where there weren't as many trees in the first place, but here, yes, it's very manmade. The patterns are beautiful in their own way, but it's very obvious that man was here and ran his fingers over the landscape to feed the country and make a profit.

    America produces almost half the world's corn. A corn field does not look like a wheat field at all. In fact, they're rather awkward-looking. They start as green little sprouts, and then they grow and grow until they're taller than you in a few month's time, green with red and orange at the very top, and then they're cut down and turn gold.
    Good.
    Only the intelligent people are confused.
    Curiosity is about reflection.

    This is kind of tough. I try to explain.

    The wilderness is irony. It is our European look at America. The wild west.
    America is (in its base) a farming society.
    Connotation: Farming is wilderness: It is not an urban way of life.

    The farmers live outside of the urban centers.
    They live in the wilderness = out there in the open.

    The Lithuanians call the open laukas.
    It is the same word as the field. The field is outside of the house.
    The original meaning of laukas is out of the house.
    A house is a kart (= a garden). The Greeks call it oikos.
    Oikonomy > economy (a thing of the house).

    The orchard is the center, the heart of the garden.
    The field is out there. In the wilderness.

    A globe is a ball.
    To conglomerate is to wind into a ball.
    To come together.

    A torp is a house. A dorf is a village.
    Villa > village.

    Cit > citizen, a member of the city. Derivative: Civilization.

    The oikos grew. It became a host of houses.
    The houses enclosed the garden.
    Not the fields.

  5. #215
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    You know, I do begin to think at times that the 20s through the 40s were actually the better decades in American history (in SOME ways, though not in all), because they represented fun (20s), overcoming hardship (30s), and pulling together to win a war (40s). We were more unified back then. Now, we can't seem to agree on anything anymore.
    I agree, at least when compared to England, where I live, the United States has comes across as a deeply divided nation for at least the last decade, probably longer. Left vs. right, Democrat vs. Republican. I don't know how long-standing this situation is. I think your 'infotainment' programmes on news stations are probably partly responsible, and Murdoch wants to bring similar atrocities to our country. I hope he fails.

    Within England and to a lesser extent the rest of the UK, the deepest felt divide is currently between the political class and everyone else. Sure left-wingers and right-wingers get irritated by each other and throw jibes around sometimes, but for the most part ordinary people and those in the media seem united in suspicion and dislike towards the average politician across the spectrum, and direct harsh, cynical criticism towards them far more often than towards each other.

    Ordinary people don't care to forcefully defend the party or politician they vote for, because they've usually picked the best of a bad bunch anyway and don't suspect critics of ulterior motives. People frequently express distrust and even loathing of particular political parties, without directing much if any of that feeling towards its voters.

    There's over-ridingly a sense that most people who vote differently than you do, do so because their experiences, interpretations and areas of knowledge are different, not because their ultimate hopes for fellow citizens are different or they're selfish, dangerous or misanthropic characters.

    I suspect this is partly because here there are far fewer social issues, e.g. abortion, that our country is deeply split on. Non-economic, non-strategic issues haven't tended to top the political agenda in the same way, and these are the ones that would be more emotive and create ill will between people of different opinions.

    Maybe religion is ultimately behind it. Back when the USA was, so I understand, more united, religious fundamentalists did not get involved in politics as much, in fact they taught that it was best not to because government was a 'worldly' concern. So the people who did get involved more often had similar religious beliefs (I suggest most were perhaps the equivalent of modern day American centrists or centre-rightists in terms of societal beliefs).

    The UK, except for Northern Ireland and perhaps London is now overwhelmingly formed of liberal Christians and the non-religious, so again people's approaches to religion are more closely aligned and as a result it's a relatively small minority of people who disagree with the majority opinion on most strictly societal and scientific issues.

  6. #216
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Good.
    Only the intelligent people are confused.
    Curiosity is about reflection.

    This is kind of tough. I try to explain.

    The wilderness is irony. It is our European look at America. The wild west.
    America is (in its base) a farming society.
    Connotation: Farming is wilderness: It is not an urban way of life.

    The farmers live outside of the urban centers.
    They live in the wilderness = out there in the open.

    The Lithuanians call the open laukas.
    It is the same word as the field. The field is outside of the house.
    The original meaning of laukas is out of the house.
    A house is a kart (= a garden). The Greeks call it oikos.
    Oikonomy > economy (a thing of the house).

    The orchard is the center, the heart of the garden.
    The field is out there. In the wilderness.

    A globe is a ball.
    To conglomerate is to wind into a ball.
    To come together.

    A torp is a house. A dorf is a village.
    Villa > village.

    Cit > citizen, a member of the city. Derivative: Civilization.

    The oikos grew. It became a host of houses.
    The houses enclosed the garden.
    Not the fields.
    Americans have a very different view of trees, though.

    Have you ever been to the University of Indiana? They pledge to plant two trees for every tree they cut down in construction. There's been a lot of construction, so there are a lot of trees.

    Ironically, the only place without a lot of trees is the Arboretum -- it only contains trees that are native to Indiana. There's a lot of wide, open space there.

    I see a lot of wide open space. Wide open fields, wide open backyards, wide open parking lots. At least when you're standing by a corn field, you can see the farm house on the other side. At the University of Indiana, you can barely see across the street.

    I hate that place.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  7. #217
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Ah, looking at this I got to looking up proximetrics (personal space). Americans and Canadians have pretty similar ideas of personal space, and these ideas are unique compared to the rest of the world -- mostly because they're, well, larger. And more than that, America is able to provide for that need of personal space because of well, the amount of space we have.

    Non-Americans, try this experiment. Hold your arm straight out in front of you, with your thumb sticking out. If you were at comfortable American talking distance with someone, you could stick that thumb in their ear. Now, hold your hand flat, pointing to the side, facing you. In places like the Mediterranean, to be at normal talking distance you'd be able to put that hand on the back of the other person's head.

    Yikes, quite a difference.

    Two other things I've heard people complain about Americans:

    1) Americans don't like to be touched

    2) Americans are always "grinning like idiots"

    Kind of sends out conflicting signals to others, I guess. Anybody have any ideas explaining these last two?
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  8. #218
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Ah, looking at this I got to looking up proximetrics (personal space). Americans and Canadians have pretty similar ideas of personal space, and these ideas are unique compared to the rest of the world -- mostly because they're, well, larger. And more than that, America is able to provide for that need of personal space because of well, the amount of space we have.

    Non-Americans, try this experiment. Hold your arm straight out in front of you, with your thumb sticking out. If you were at comfortable American talking distance with someone, you could stick that thumb in their ear. Now, hold your hand flat, pointing to the side, facing you. In places like the Mediterranean, to be at normal talking distance you'd be able to put that hand on the back of the other person's head.

    Yikes, quite a difference.

    Two other things I've heard people complain about Americans:

    1) Americans don't like to be touched

    2) Americans are always "grinning like idiots"

    Kind of sends out conflicting signals to others, I guess. Anybody have any ideas explaining these last two?
    I have not been in Indiana. I have never been to the U.S.

    I checked the university, mapwise, a year ago. Usually a university campus is an open place. Like Berkeley in California. So sorry.

    Maybe the two signals are not so conflicting. Touching is personal, very Mediterranean.
    Grinning is impersonal. It is a sign of high spirits. Left hemisphere, low cortex activity.

  9. #219
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    I have not been in Indiana. I have never been to the U.S.

    I checked the university, mapwise, a year ago. Usually a university campus is an open place. Like Berkeley in California. So sorry.

    Maybe the two signals are not so conflicting. Touching is personal, very Mediterranean.
    Grinning is impersonal. It is a sign of high spirits. Left hemisphere, low cortex activity.
    The University of Indiana is very unique in its foliage. It's often considered very beautiful. I don't want to live in trees, though. I grew out of that years ago.

    Smiling is obligatory with eye contact in America. If you meet someone's eyes, you start to smile. You see them, and you know they see you. In America, you greet people a thousand times a day with "Oh, I am here, and so are you. It's so nice to see a friendly face in this Godforsaken place." If they don't smile back, a feeling of dread washes over you. There's something wrong, you think. Did I say something wrong? Did something happen? Did someone die? Am I so dreadful to set eyes upon that they won't greet me properly? It seems arrogant to always expect a smile when even making eye contact with a stranger -- but if the ones that didn't were always harbingers of bad news, wouldn't you expect a smile, too?

    Perhaps it's mostly an issue to the South and East, then. Our Southern neighbors often take smiling as permission to get closer. To the East, smiling is not obligatory, but touching is no problem.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  10. #220
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1
    Posts
    3,823

    Default

    If all goes according to plan, I'll be leaving the Canadian prairies next summer and moving to a yet-to-be-determined American city for several years for schooling (I can't get my degree in Canada). I am looking forward to it, but at this point there's too many unknowns to get all hooked on it.

    Things that I'm mulling over about the differences:
    • America: entering into the incestuous relationship between politics and religion
    • Canada: leaving behind people who are too cautious about casually speaking their stronger beliefs because we're so "live and let live" that they're afraid of giving off the impression that they don't respect your beliefs (I'm over-exaggerating, it's fine to have at'er and all, especially when people intend to talk politics or religion, but it feels like sometimes it's not appropriate to ever bring up politics and religion in ways that it'd be appropriate in The States for just a sentence or two in the middle of a different conversation topic)
    • America: I can order stuff online without ginormous international border crossing fees
    • America: weirded out by the patriotism (in Canada, "being Canadian" is secondary to "being yourself"; you're allowed to live and let live more, but OTOH, it makes people less united
    • Canada: I like my toonies and loonies (wtf is with paper money for such small amounts, Americans?)


    Also: I don't think the reasoning, "America is unusually diverse" is a good excuse, because while it's certainly true that America is incredibly diverse, it's not uniquely diverse. A lot of this is just in-group v. out-group stuff; you can see the nuances a lot better in places where you spend a lot of your time. There are old European nations who have many languages and cultures to the point that they cannot understand each other speaking. Sure, the USA has a lot of geography differences, but so does Canada and a number of other countries.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
    C.S. Lewis

Similar Threads

  1. [Fe] Extraverted Feeling in American Culture
    By Gabe_2 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-16-2015, 01:03 PM
  2. Of death and children and American culture... What's the reason?
    By Risen in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-18-2012, 11:58 AM
  3. Why is American Culture so against the Martial Arts and Fight Sports
    By DiscoBiscuit in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 85
    Last Post: 11-23-2010, 03:16 AM
  4. Americans--care to be my cultural interpreter?
    By Usehername in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-18-2009, 11:09 PM
  5. Web 2.0 - the death of culture?
    By Langrenus in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-04-2007, 08:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO