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Thread: Performing

  1. #31
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Could it be said that part of the success of the performance lies in the hands of the audience?

    In essence: what you can do is give it all your best, but whether they like it or not, is really up to how openminded they are, appreciative, how many other htings are going on in their life, how destracted they are by that, having the wrong or right expectations, or even better, none at all, allowing for full surprise...etc etc.

    Is the audience responsible for its own entertainment and enjoyment to great extent?
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  2. #32
    full of love Kingfisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    How do you trust an audience with your heart when you don't even know them well enough or have enough of a bond with each one of them to know they won't hurt you?
    for me, i can expose my heart during a performance because i know nothing the audience can do or say will cheapen it. they can boo all they want, but it is my heart and no one else can make me feel guilty for expressing it.
    although, i do find it very awkward to talk to people after performing. it is easier for me to express myself, my heart, in a performance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    ^ It's interesting to see this between Js and Ps.., especially TJs and FPs, I think...

    Since we're motivated by different things, we need different motivations to be on stage. TJs seem to be driven by 'nailing it', perfecting the skill and relish the idea of being awesome at something, and gain their confidence from knowing they're good. And that will fuel them to give it all their best and actually give a kick-ass performance.

    Whereas FPs seem to gain it from the journey, inviting the audience to experience their passion with them and can perform their best when they actually lose themselves in the performance as well. Though practice and skill does boost confidence, focussing on completing 'a mission' (giving a kick-ass performance) doesn't, as it does for TJs. In fact, it's the letting go on stage and actually feeling in sync with both the audience and the performance that makes them shine.
    i like those descriptions. i was thinking, it seems like there is a difference between losing yourself in that specific performance and losing yourself in your passion. i don't know if that makes sense. i am obsessed with being perfectly in tune with myself and my passion, but i have a feeling when i play music that i am in touch with myself rather than my performance. i feel like i disassociate from the actual performance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Could it be said that part of the success of the performance lies in the hands of the audience?

    In essence: what you can do is give it all your best, but whether they like it or not, is really up to how openminded they are, appreciative, how many other htings are going on in their life, how destracted they are by that, having the wrong or right expectations, or even better, none at all, allowing for full surprise...etc etc.

    Is the audience responsible for its own entertainment and enjoyment to great extent?
    i think that's very true. which is why i disregard the audience to some extent. i appreciate them, and hope they get something positive from the performance, but that is not really up to me. it is better to focus on myself as a performer, i think, than worry about the audience.

  3. #33
    Senior Member souffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    Yeah that is really it. To give a moving performance you are transparent. You get up there and bear your heart and soul to the audience, and they love you for it. I think this is doubly true for those people who perform things they actually wrote themselves.

    As an actor I think I might have an easier time with this compared to a singer. I am bearing the heart and soul of a fictional character. Still I put part of myself into every character I create, and so I am still bearing that part of me for the world to see.
    And that's what I love about acting so much- I can show off to an audience and expose myself without ever having to worry about it, because I'm too busy being my character. I can ignore the audience and I'm supposed to.. otherwise that would be a break in character! = bad. Having to engage an audience in a singing performance, and being yourself, is.. more difficult.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith
    Hmmm....In a way this is really kind of like telling someone your deepest darkest secrets.

    In fact..that could be just it. You put yourself out there, in all your passion, show yourself vulnerable when performing (at least, if you put your heart and soul in it), vulnerable to rejection and being ridiculed. Instead of fessing up your deepest darkest secrets to one person, you're doing it in front of a crowd, adding to the pressure. Especially as there is no way you can know that you can trust them all.

    At least that's how it feels to me. How do you trust an audience with your heart when you don't even know them well enough or have enough of a bond with each one of them to know they won't hurt you?

    On the other hand...sharing that with so many people who do appreciate that you put your heart and soul in it must be fantastic. In fact, treating it as an experience to share and to just completely surrender to yourself, might take away the anxiety. Easier said than done though.

    Try and separate the fear of rejection from the anxiety and stage fright. Even the best performers get stage fright, but because they love what they do so much, with all the heart expressing/sharing/deep dark secret sharing, they come through and do it. Basically, you can have stagefright without the fear of rejection and ridicule. Stagefright is probably an inevitable thing, but fear of rejection is something you can get over. Fix up that attitude and self esteem! You can do it!

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    Senior Member souffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Could it be said that part of the success of the performance lies in the hands of the audience?

    In essence: what you can do is give it all your best, but whether they like it or not, is really up to how openminded they are, appreciative, how many other htings are going on in their life, how destracted they are by that, having the wrong or right expectations, or even better, none at all, allowing for full surprise...etc etc.

    Is the audience responsible for its own entertainment and enjoyment to great extent?
    And yes, good work!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Could it be said that part of the success of the performance lies in the hands of the audience?

    In essence: what you can do is give it all your best, but whether they like it or not, is really up to how openminded they are, appreciative, how many other htings are going on in their life, how destracted they are by that, having the wrong or right expectations, or even better, none at all, allowing for full surprise...etc etc.

    Is the audience responsible for its own entertainment and enjoyment to great extent?
    From my point of view the audience does not consist of individuals. The audience is one large beast itself. It has its own feelings and thoughts quite independent of its individual members.

    In fact you might say the success of a performer is in how well they address this large beast in front of them. Perhaps the performer could be considered a lion tamer and the audience a large and friendly lion. It can roar, it can growl, it can be bored and indifferent, it can be amused and even roar with laughter. And indeed it can love or hate you. And sometimes it can eat you alive. But most of all it loves to be stroked and then you can feel the whole audience purr.

  6. #36
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I'd like to ask those that enjoy performing for an audience (be it amateur, professional, improvisational, on stage, off stage, whatever), to share their experiences.

    What is so enjoyable about it? How do you not feel daunted by the fact that soo many people are watching you, expecting something great, and you have to deliver? How do you have the guts to think that you can entertain them for an extended amount of time? That you are worthy of their time? How do you determine if you're skilled enough/if your act is good enough? And how do you put together your act? What makes you decide on the elements? Etc, etc.

    for those needing confirmation: I have stagefright
    You answered your question. Read what you said.

    A performer never questions.
    A questioner never performs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    A performer never questions.
    A questioner never performs.
    This is very true. It doesn't matter whether you are performing on a stage or talking on the telephone or writing a poem or dancing to music.

    Without question, the dancer becomes the dance.

  8. #38
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I'd like to ask those that enjoy performing for an audience (be it amateur, professional, improvisational, on stage, off stage, whatever), to share their experiences.

    What is so enjoyable about it? How do you not feel daunted by the fact that soo many people are watching you, expecting something great, and you have to deliver? How do you have the guts to think that you can entertain them for an extended amount of time? That you are worthy of their time? How do you determine if you're skilled enough/if your act is good enough? And how do you put together your act? What makes you decide on the elements? Etc, etc.

    for those needing confirmation: I have stagefright
    I have terrible stage fright too, but it's weird, the stage fright pushes me to perform. I'm one of those people that runs towards the eery sound in the dark, precisely because I'm terrified.

    I love doing sales presentations and giving speeches because I do them well; but again, I'm always freaking out in the inside. No matter how many times I get up in front of other people and get an applause or kudos, I still approach the situation with an intense fear of rejection of my ideas.**shivers**

    I always do a lot of research before I get up in front of a group to share my knowledge. Presentations are one of the few things that I will prepare for long in advance. Well, not that long, but at least a few nights before. I know I'm offering something that people want because they come to me for the information. And that's another thing, I don't feel comfortable sharing unless I've been requested to do so in some way. It's the only way I know that I'm worthy of my audience's time.

    I use the demographics in my audience and environmental cues to determine how I will present.

    Oh, and oddly, I've always been good at theatrical and musical performances, but I've been too afraid to pursue them. Don't know what the difference is. I suspect I feel more at ease with presenting my intellect versus my creativity.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  9. #39
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    There are some great insights in the replies here. It really has helped me to mull this over.


    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    And that's another thing, I don't feel comfortable sharing unless I've been requested to do so in some way. It's the only way I know that I'm worthy of my audience's time.
    This is something I also strongly identify with.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    I've always been good at theatrical and musical performances...
    It's interesting we think of ourselves as being good or bad rather than becoming a song or a character or a dance.

    Being good or bad is such a distancing device. It distances us from the song or the character or the dance. But most of all it distances us from the audience.

    And without thinking or questioning, the audience responds in kind and distances themselves from us by judging whether we are good or bad - the very thing we most fear - but the very thing we most desire.

    For we want to be distant from the song, the character, the dance or the audience because most of all we want to be distant from ourselves. And we want to be distant for the very simple reason of control - we want to control ourselves and we want to control the audience.

    Gosh, even Maxwell Smart knew Control was the enemy. And Pogo tells us, "I have seen the enemy and the enemy is us".

    For how can we enter spontaneous intimacy with the audience if we don't let go of control? How can we enter spontaneous intimacy with the audience if we are not spontaneously intimate with ourselves?

    Let's face reality here - we much prefer control to spontaneous intimacy.

    Maxwell Smart and Pogo both know the score.

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