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Thread: Performing

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    for those needing confirmation: I have stagefright
    Hey welcome to the club.

    I agree with toonia there's no simple tricks one can do except just pratice doing it. I know the more I perform in public, the easier it becomes - although even then my sense of stagefright still remains and I'm always relieved when it's finally over.

    As a J probably, I usually like to be well prepared - otherwise I can easily loose myself and screw up - as I did recently a few weeks ago (). Also I find looking directly at the audience really makes me nervous - so I always have to look just above their heads in order to maintain myself.

  2. #12
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I love singing..but only to myself. I don't consider myself nearly good enough to perform before an audience. And this applies to giving speeches, making presentations, singing, dancing, performing in every way. I consider it ridiculous to ask for people's time and concentration when what I have to present is not up to standard, imo. It is only when I am able to forget that there is an audience (like when a conversation automatically turns into a show, i don't care about being at the center of it as it feels like a joined effort, or like when i can concentrate on the craft I'm performing and am not confronted with the fact that there is in fact an audience), that I can actually perform at my very best as the pressure is just taking off my shoulders.
    This last part struck me, and I know what it is like to get caught in the negative feedback loop of perfectionism. One thing that gives me balance is to think about how I experience someone else's performance as an audience member. Do I feel they are wasting my time if they make mistakes or don't play with much feeling? When I realize that I can appreciate someone else's attempt to share something they have worked on and has meaning for them, then I realize that someone else feels that way when I perform. It helps to then view myself from a distance as though I am that other person.

    A great deal of musical training pushes perfection in a way that can become an obstacle. This is especially destructive when social competition enters the picture. That is what did me in. When I reached a point that I realized my performance would be an unpleasant experience for someone else if I did well just as certainly as if I failed, then the whole thing looked ridiculous and hopeless. Grounding myself in my own reactions to others and my own ability to appreciate both exceptional skill beyond my own and skill not as developed as my own, is what helped me start building a more balanced view of my own performing. I still work at it each time.
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  3. #13
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Ah, post performance triste.

    After communion with the audience, how natural to feel the lose afterwards.

    Some performers say they are still high after a performance, and have to come down slowly, usually with the aid of a drink or two at a back-stage party and a bit of talk. But really they are dealing with their sadness, their triste, at finding their lover, their audience, then losing them when it's over.

    Oh, who would be a performer with stage fright at the beginning and post performance triste at the end.

    But who can resist a love affair with an audience - that large warm beast, breathing in front of you, breathing with you, with each breath taking you higher and higher, until you are breathing as one.

  4. #14
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I'd like to ask those that enjoy performing for an audience (be it amateur, professional, improvisational, on stage, off stage, whatever), to share their experiences.

    What is so enjoyable about it? How do you not feel daunted by the fact that soo many people are watching you, expecting something great, and you have to deliver? How do you have the guts to think that you can entertain them for an extended amount of time? That you are worthy of their time? How do you determine if you're skilled enough/if your act is good enough? And how do you put together your act? What makes you decide on the elements? Etc, etc.

    for those needing confirmation: I have stagefright
    I've done a fair amount of acting, and the truth is I love it. However when I was younger I was pretty shy and had really bad stagefright whenever I got in front of a group of people. I think the biggest secret to overcoming stagefright is just to keep getting up in front of people, but I can also share some of the other things I've learned.

    The first thing is that I love to entertain people. That helps me get up in front of them. I especially love doing comedy, because I get instant feedback about whether I am doing well or not. When I was younger I wasn't performing for the audience. I was just worrying that I would mess up, and that made me more critical and contributed to my stagefright.

    Another thing I need to tell you is that I never stop getting nervous. No matter how many times I perform whenever I'm about to go on the nerves come full force, and my body is pumped with adrenaline. This is both an advantage and a disadvantage. On the one hand my mouth is dry and my hands shake making it easier for me to mess up. On the other hand my awareness is heightened and time seems to slow down, and my emotional state is heightened as well. This lets me put a lot more detail into my gestures and and voice inflections, to focus on the other actors, and it also makes it easier to really put my heart into the performance. Because of this I can give a higher quality performance in front of a real audience than I ever could during rehearsal.

    So anyway I think that can transfer to music. When you get up there it will be harder for you to give a perfect performance, but it will be easier to give a soulful performance. You are more likely to make a mistake, but you're emotions will be at a high. Focus on connecting your feelings with the music, and you'll give a performance that will move the audience to tears. Not only will the audience be impressed, but I think you'll find you connect to the music in a deeper way than previously possible.
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  5. #15
    Alexander the Terrible yenom's Avatar
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    Its enjoyable because its a challenge.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member BlahBlahNounBlah's Avatar
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    It's fun.

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    I've always loved performing. I always did the talent show in grade school, playing guitar. I was in a band in high school, did a play in high school (only to have a chance at a meeting a particular brunette, who I then dated for 4 years), and since then have evolved to love giving speeches, teaching classes (computer software), training people at health clubs, and just about everyday of my life entertaining people. I love entertaining people, making them laugh, always have. I've never had fear of rejection from a crowd, seriously!

  8. #18
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I'd like to ask those that enjoy performing for an audience (be it amateur, professional, improvisational, on stage, off stage, whatever), to share their experiences.

    What is so enjoyable about it?
    I think the joy is twofold. First, the excitement of the actual act of performing itself. My favorite type of performing is improv - spontaneously expressing the ideas that come to me based on the situation I'm presented with. So having to think quickly of what to say or what to do and how to say or do it is a rush in itself. The second part is impact on the audience. Getting a reaction from people based on something I do or say makes me feel good and feel a natural high and spurs me on to further performance.

    How do you not feel daunted by the fact that soo many people are watching you, expecting something great, and you have to deliver?
    Well, I've got it easy here, because I have rarely performed in a situation where people expected greatness out of me. But I think the "daunted" is part of the thrill as I said, you have to sort of have a challenge to really get up for the performance and want to give it your all.

    How do you have the guts to think that you can entertain them for an extended amount of time?
    I haven't thought much about that, I guess it's a matter of whether I'm in the zone or not, and when I no longer am, then the time is no longer extended. I have been in scripted plays before, and although they aren't as enjoyable as improv, I had a time allotted for those and I just simply tried to do the best i can with what I was given, I don't think guts had much to do with it, I just did it.

    That you are worthy of their time? How do you determine if you're skilled enough/if your act is good enough?
    Well, that goes back to the audience reaction I guess. If people respond positively, then I know I am "worthy" of keeping it going. And if not, move on to something else. But the performance urge doesn't stay down for long, even if a particular audience wasn't impressed with me.

    And how do you put together your act? What makes you decide on the elements?
    I haven't done much putting together of an act, I'm simply taken opportunities where they present themselves - i.e. school performances, community theater, internet chat rooms, whatever I could use for the purpose of entertaining that didn't require much preparation.

    Etc, etc.
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  9. #19
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    Follow up thought:

    Alot of any performance's success depends on the CONFIDENCE of the performer.

    When I was younger, I never got on a stage unless I had faith I could do whatever it was I set out to do.

    Now, I'm more apt to wing things, but still, I will not get up and make an ass of myself trying to do something I have no clue about.

    Anyhoo...


  10. #20
    Senior Member souffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Alright, I guess it's time to share.

    I've always had stagefright. But, I've found it easier to surpress when I'm actually unaware of the audience, oddly enough. I remember having to perform (I play the flute) for my grand jury exam when I was 11, in a big empty concert hall with the judges at the very end of the room. I had been playing these pieces for weeks (my music teacher made sure of that) and I was sooooooo bored of them, that I hardly practised at all anymore at home. Just before I had to go on stage, I played all through them just one more time and felt a bit nervous. Once on stage however, the light blinded me, making it impossible to see the room, and, I had to focus on the pianist who was to support my music. I also automatically focussed on the music sheets, and pretty much forgot where I was. As a result, I blew them away (my music teacher was utterly annoyed with that as he knew I hadn't been preparing in the way I should've according to him).

    Compare this however to my exam for singing and well...it was a disaster.
    Again a grand jury, but this time in a normal room, with them just sitting at a desk. We were required to bring three pieces, 2 of which we were allowed to prepare ( I had to sing 'Carmen' of all things!). I practised for weeks, as I very much enjoy singing, it relaxes me. The third one we were to study while the person before us was taking their exam. I was incapable of concentrating, as I was *so* nervous. Hence, I was unable to learn the third, simple piece. At all. Full mental block. I came into the room and my voice trembled, I no longer had control (and my god, can it be shrill when yo udon't have control). I sounded like a cat in pain, and I knew it. I could hear every wrong tone my voice hit, with absolutely no control. I even forgot how to breathe or just swallow, something that comes so naturally. And of course the 'performance' of third piece was the perfect ending to catastrophic exam. My music teacher, who loved my voice (to the point where you got a bit paranoid about it), asked me afterwards: *what* in gods name happened???? I was unable to reply as I was still trembling. These days, even in an empty karaokebar, with only the dj present and the staff, and the dj singing along with me, I still am not able to control my voice and the sweat is gushing from my back.
    I play flute too!

    I'm sorry to hear about your bad experiences.. and like others in this discussion have said, it does get better with practise. I personally have performed a flute solo to the same group of people (my Music class) 4 times this year, and each time I get more and more confident, as it becomes more familiar. We'll see how I go with my exam and then my final moderation, both coming up in a month!


    I love singing..but only to myself. I don't consider myself nearly good enough to perform before an audience. And this applies to giving speeches, making presentations, singing, dancing, performing in every way. I consider it ridiculous to ask for people's time and concentration when what I have to present is not up to standard, imo. It is only when I am able to forget that there is an audience (like when a conversation automatically turns into a show, i don't care about being at the center of it as it feels like a joined effort, or like when i can concentrate on the craft I'm performing and am not confronted with the fact that there is in fact an audience), that I can actually perform at my very best as the pressure is just taking off my shoulders.
    That attitude's a recipe for success if I ever saw one!

    If people had paid a significant amount of money to see you, if you were a member of a symphony orchestra, a world famous soloist, a professional, then that's when you might be expected to be pretty bloody good. If they weren't bloody good, they wouldn't have gotten into the orchestra/ be world famous, so they don't have much to fear! If you're not a professional, then I'm pretty sure people won't get angry at you for your imperfections. But like toonia said, starting off in a fairly low pressure situation, then gradually working your way up as you gain confidence, is good.
    I suspect that you're not that bad (your teacher loved your voice, right?), but everyone always has room for improvement. You think you're not good enough? Work on it more! But there comes a point where you have to draw the line between whether it's your talent, or self esteem that's lacking.

    Also, try and learn not to be so afraid of stuffing up. We are human, and even the professionals do it (they are great at covering it up though). It's all a learning experience after all- something to improve on in the future. NOT THE BE ALL AND END ALL OF EVERYTHING!! And once you have experienced it all, the nerves, the really bad stuff ups, etc, and over a long period of time and with lots of practise learned to overcome it, then you'll be all the more proud of your achievements and confident in yourself! yay!

    Now here's what I personally enjoy about performing (what you asked for in the OP!)

    -Vanity boost. Showing everyone how great I am. "Wow, she's a really good flute player/actor", the audience will say. Yes, I do have confidence in my talents! - and in my capacity to become even more talented as time goes on!

    -Share something important to me with loved ones. For a play I recently did, I talked about it to my family and friends nonstop for months. The performance night was their chance to see what I had been blabbing on about all this time! And hopefully be impressed.

    -For acting in particular- the thrill of the audience's presence. When the teacher comes behind stage and tells you the room is packed. When you go onstage with the lights on you and feel them there. And enter a weird trance like state and immerse yourself in what your doing. And the jump-up-and-downy adrenaline before and after.



    That will do for now- this has been a long post.

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