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  1. #1
    Priestess Of Syrinx Katsuni's Avatar
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    Default Puzzle pieces and information processing

    Alright so I was in a discussion earlier with wonka, the context of the discussion doesn't really matter, but whot it got me thinking on was the order in which people process information and how they apply it.

    An analogy I ended up using after the conversation, was in building a puzzle.

    I'm heavy Ne and Ti, but I use them seperately, one after the other, so in the puzzle description, I do things in this manner:



    1: dump all the puzzle pieces onto the table

    2: sort the individual pieces by generic type; ie corners, sides, center pieces

    3: further subdivide groups; ie sides that're blue distinctive from sides that're red

    4: connect outside rim into a frame with all 4 corners and sides attached

    5: build key sections (a big blue flower on one side, a red one on the other) seperately and relatively placed roughly where they should be

    6: fill in remaining gaps with leftover pieces



    This's a very specific and methodical process that works great on larger puzzles, though is needlessly time consuming on smaller ones. For looking at a larger picture, however, it makes perfect sense and is highly effective.

    My main issue would be difficulties in just placing pieces where they should go on say... a 25 piece puzzle, I'd still want to maintain the same methodology even if it's not nearly as practically useful.

    So, using this puzzle building as an example (and just stating how yeu build puzzles in general), how do yeu build a puzzle and does this match with yeur methodology in confronting problems in the world as well?

  2. #2

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    When I solve a puzzle (or just generally solving things in real life) what I do is look at the superficiality of the problem first, the most obvious pieces of the puzzle (the outer frame pieces) and then just go from there going deeper and deeper until I finish the puzzle (and solve the problem) I guess it means I like to start things from the top and go deeper.

    Now this is what I usually do, but sometimes just to mix things up and give myself a challenge I'd just connect a few random pieces, and then another few random pieces, and then another until I have a whole bunch of semi connected pieces and then I'll put those pieces together. Its how I tackle problems in real life sometimes I just gather information at random until it all starts to make sense....and that's when I'll get my little "AHA!" moment. =)
    Men are like parking spaces/the good ones are always taken and the ones left are handicapped or to small.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    You could have cut to the chase and merely said:
    Your brain methodically classifies bits of data, then places it within a self-imposed framework.

    I don't see the reason for complicating something, so simple.

    When I put a puzzle together, there is no observable method.
    It's all internal and intuitive.
    (Then people ask me how the hell I did it so fast.)


    I'd tell you.
    But then I'd have to kill you.

  4. #4
    Priestess Of Syrinx Katsuni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    You could have cut to the chase and merely said:
    Your brain methodically classifies bits of data, then places it within a self-imposed framework.
    Because it's easier with a simple analogy/example to show the actual reasoning that takes place. If I stated "classifies bits of data and places in self imposed framework", it just doesn't have nearly the same relation, many people won't know how to even define how they think and such... having a simple, easy to understand frame of referance works well. People who don't even KNOW how they think can even answer if they feel like it simply by explaining how they put a puzzle togeather.

    Hence, it's simply more effective, if less concise.

  5. #5
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    I find that the way I build a puzzle does reflect the way I approach real life problems as well.
    Firstly, I dump all the pieces on the table. I want to have an overview of all the pieces, so I turn the pieces face up and spread them on the table. This is what I do with problems in real life. I need to find out all the possible aspects and find the best possible way to approach the problem. Seeing the big picture, having a overview of all the possibilities to a solution I'm able to see at that particular moment.

    Then I start to close in on the solution. Just as in a puzzle, building a frame, connecting the pieces one by one. I find sections among the pieces that sort of "pop" out right from the start and I start building from there. I don't necessarily concentrate on a single section all the time. Building several at a time helps to see the connections much better and sort out the pieces until the puzzle is finished.
    Problem solved.

  6. #6
    Shaman BlackCat's Avatar
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    1. I see a problem (unsolved puzzle)
    2. I figure out the parts of the problem and segregate the parts of the problem into different places in my mind until I get around to solving that part of it (dividing pieces by color and where they may go)
    3. I figure out each part of the problem and then the whole. (finish it)

    Child's play. Nothing complicated.
    () 9w8-3w4-7w6 tritype.

    sCueI (primary Inquisition)

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katsuni View Post
    Because it's easier with a simple analogy/example to show the actual reasoning that takes place. If I stated "classifies bits of data and places in self imposed framework", it just doesn't have nearly the same relation,
    What's next-- analyzing how you tie your tennis shoes?
    Don't.

    That might take up 3 pages.

  8. #8
    Junior Member camille's Avatar
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    I sort by color, then pick out corner pieces, then place completed parts in their approx. area. I do not like to look at the cover while I'm putting together a puzzle.

  9. #9
    Obsession. Lethe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    What's next-- analyzing how you tie your tennis shoes?
    Don't.

    That might take up 3 pages.
    NPs (esp. ENPs), they actively use their environment to process information.
    NJs are inclined to do this in solitude, or passively use the environment.

    Ne Example: Brainstorming, bouncing ideas off each other, etc.
    "I cannot expect even my own art to provide all of the answers -- only to hope it keeps asking the right questions." -- Grace Hartigan

    Enneagram: Tritype - 1w9, 5 (balanced wings), 2w3; Overall Variant: So/Sx
    SLOAN: rCoa|I|
    Functional Preferences: Ni, Te/Fi, Ti, Se, Fe, Si, Ne


    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Looking into the eyes of a [Ni user] is like peeking through a portal into a parallel universe.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lethe View Post
    NPs (esp. ENPs), they actively use their environment to process information.
    NJs are inclined to do this in solitude, or passively use the environment.

    Ne Example: Brainstorming, bouncing ideas off each other, etc.

    I'm well aware of that behavior.

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